education

The Record: Tuesday, Jan 26, Full Show

Jan 26, 2016
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Seattle's mayor says homelessness is dividing the city into two overheated, unrealistic conversations. He'll tell you the solutions that he calls "reality-based." 

A Seattle animal researcher will tell you why she wants your vacation photos -- yes, even your iPhone snapshots can help her.

And a survivor of rape at a Seattle Catholic school wants to know why his attacker was not on that list released by the Seattle Archdiocese.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

Highline school bus driver Rodger Fowler shows off his stop paddle – and (in the lower-right corner) the camera that captures motorists who ignore the paddle.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Bill Radke talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about differing education bills out of the Democratic-led House and Republican-controlled Senate in the state capitol this week.

Picture your favorite college professor. Here are some adjectives that might come to mind: Wise. Funny. Caring. Prompt. Passionate. Organized. Tough but fair.

Now, are you thinking of a man or a woman?

A new study argues that student evaluations are systematically biased against women — so much so, in fact, that they're better mirrors of gender bias than of what they are supposed to be measuring: teaching quality.

It's a cold day in Copenhagen, and the brightly colored snowsuits worn by Danish children make it easy to pick them out of a crowd here at the Odense Zoo, on the Danish island of Fyn. There are dozens of kids — all ages — many of them standing as close as possible to the euthanized lion laid out on a table.

"We're here to see the lion cut open," says 6-year-old Liv.

West Woodland Elementary in North Seattle hosts Kids Inc child care center. Seattle Public Schools will be reclaiming space at elementary schools that are currently occupied by child care groups. The district has not released a list of impacted sites.
Google Maps

The Seattle School Board is scheduled to vote Wednesday night whether to take back 19 classrooms now used for preschool and before-and-after-school care.

On a recent, chilly Sunday morning, children ranging in age from 4 to 6 waited with their parents in the cafeteria of a Brooklyn school. Each wore a name tag.

The kids chatted cheerfully (in several languages) until each was summoned upstairs to be tested for a spot in New York City's gifted program. Their parents sent them off with hugs and the promise of special treats for doing their best.

Take two 18-year-olds with equally stellar academic abilities. One comes from the socioeconomic bottom and one from the top. That lower-income student is one-third as likely to enroll in a selective college.

In the Navajo culture, teachers are revered as "wisdom keepers," entrusted with the young to help them grow and learn. This is how Tia Tsosie Begay approaches her work as a fourth-grade teacher at a small public school on the outskirts of Tucson, Ariz.

For Navajos, says Begay, your identity is not just a name; it ties you to your ancestors, which in turn defines you as a person.

"My maternal clan is 'water's edge'; my paternal clan is 'water flows together,' " she explains. "Our healing power is through humor and laughter, and I try to bring that to my classroom."