Ed Murray | KUOW News and Information

Ed Murray

KUOW PHOTO/JASON PAGANO

Bill Radke talks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about his plans for a five-year, $275 million property tax levy to pay for additional homeless services, and we open up the phones to take your questions for the mayor.

People gather March 8, 2017 to remember the homeless men and women who have died on Seattle's streets in the past year
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray unveiled details Wednesday for how money from a proposed homelessness levy would be spent. 

The proposed property tax increase would raise $275 million over five years. The goals, as laid out by the city, are to get 5,000 people into stable housing, open up 5,000 new addiction treatment slots, increase mental health treatment, and increase outreach to get people off the streets and into services.


Chris Porter
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

During his "State of the City" address, Seattle mayor Ed Murray announced a new initiative called Our Best. It focuses on improving the lives of young black men in the city.

Chris Porter is part of the African American Male Advisory Committee for Seattle Public Schools. Kim Malcolm talks to him about his thoughts on the announcement.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Seattle officials are threatening to sue the Trump Administration if they don't get detailed information about the president's immigration policies.

Mayor Ed Murray made the threat during the state of the city address Tuesday.

The homeless encampment known as the Jungle was he scene of a Jan. 26, 2016 shooting that killed two and wounded three.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A federal judge ruled Tuesday that the City of Seattle and state transportation officials can continue their practice of sweeping out homeless camps and removing people's belongings.

Seattle is a step closer to more civilian oversight of the city's police department.

Mayor Ed Murray announced Wednesday that long-awaited police accountability legislation is ready to go before the City Council. 

Larry Hubbel, Joni Balter, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee at Seattle University
Courtesy of Sophie Egan

Back in 2005 Seattle announced a 10-year plan to end homelessness. That plan failed.

The One Night Count of unsheltered homeless people in King County made in 2006 totaled 1,946. That total increased to 4,505 in 2016.

What to do? Seattle’s Mayor Ed Murray and San Francisco’s Mayor Ed Lee grapple with that question on a daily basis. Both are keenly aware of the reality of homelessness, and serious about finding solutions. 

As a new president takes office Friday, the City of Seattle will mark the occasion with a huge event for immigrants and refugees. It’s a symbolic contrast to events in Washington, D.C. And it also aims to help about a thousand immigrants with citizenship applications and other legal services.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announces more resources for immigrant families in the city's public schools.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

The City of Seattle plans to boost counseling resources in public schools for immigrant and refugee students, particularly those who are undocumented or Muslim.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about current issues facing the city including being a sanctuary city for immigrants, tackling a West Coast homeless problem, ensuring affordable housing, preserving the culture in neighborhoods facing rapid gentrification  and bringing a new sports team (and arena) to the city. 

There are eight tiny houses in Othello Village. The non-profit group Low Income Housing Institute is raising to build more for the Southeast Seattle encampment.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The city of Seattle says it will open three new temporary camps for homeless people. Two of those sites will have tiny houses. The other will have tents, according to a statement Thursday from the Human Services Department.

Flickr photo/Sound Transit Special Selection (CC BY 2.0) / https://flic.kr/p/v5Pwp5

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray spent part of his Thanksgiving signing an executive order reaffirming policies to protect immigrants. Murray says Seattle will maintain its status as a welcoming city and announced the policy in a video message.

Stackhouse Apartments, South Lake Union
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

This week the Seattle City Council and Mayor Ed Murray passed a budget package for the next two years. With it, council members hope to take on one of the city's biggest problems: housing affordability.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about what a Trump administration could mean for the city of Seattle. 

Social workers Bradly Smith and Jackie St. Louis check in on Tonja Warner, who is homeless. Smith and St. Louis walk with cops on their beat and connect people they encounter with services.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about the state of emergency on homelessness and what we've done in the year since it was declared.

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