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economy

HIV prevention
Flickr Photo/DFID - UK Department For International Development

Access to HIV and TB treatment has been improving worldwide. The rate of new infections is going down. But tuberculosis remains deadly, especially for the poverty stricken — TB killed 1.4 million people in 2011. Luwiza Makukula was diagnosed with HIV and TB after her husband died in 2001. Not only was she sick, she was completely isolated. Today, she works with NGOs focused on treatment, care, and support for HIV/TB patients, including Zambia's Community Initiative for TB, HIV/AIDS and Malaria (CITAM+). Luwiza Makukula joins us.

Unless lawmakers in the other Washington can come to an agreement, the US is facing $85 billion of automatic spending cuts. How will sequestration hit us here in the Evergreen state?

Ross Reynolds talks with Governor Jay Inslee's budget director, David Schumacher, about how the looming federal budget cuts will impact Washington state.

Oscar trophies
AP Photo/Alex Domanski/dapd


Vancouver Sun political columnist Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton makes some Oscar predictions and previews SIFF's upcoming Noir City series. Then, Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton reviews the latest news on the Dreamliner and gives his take on the federal budget sequester and immigration reform proposals.

Nationally the private sector added 5 million jobs since a low point in June of 2009. But during that same time period the public sector cut 721,000 jobs. What effect is the shrinking public sector having on the economy? And what’s the story here in Washington state?

DONNELLY, Idaho - The real estate crash triggered some big bankruptcies in the Northwest, but few are as spectacular and convoluted as the foreclosure of the unfinished Tamarack Resort in western Idaho. What was supposed to be the Northwest's newest destination resort remains in extended legal limbo, but plucky homeowners are keeping it alive until a new buyer arrives.

corrine klug / Flickr

Is tipping the best way to compensate people? Would you rather people get tipped or get paid higher wages? And is 25 percent the new 20 percent? KUOW’s Ross Reynolds takes your phone calls.

Matthew Yglesias / Flickr

Matthew Yglesias is a business and economics correspondent for Slate Magazine. In March he published his latest book titled "The Rent is Too Damn High." Today Ross talks to him about everything from Patty Murray to Spotify to policies on immigration.

Sylvester Stallone
Courtesy/Wikipedia


Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton appraises two new movies starring some of the biggest names of 1980s Hollywood: Stallone and Schwarzenegger. Then, Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton considers the economic fortunes of Tacoma and the South Sound and wraps up the latest news on the Boeing 787.

The Politics Of Federal Immigration Reform

Jan 29, 2013
Congressional Immigration Reform
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite


There appears to be a bipartisan deal in Congress to reform the country's immigration policy, as Democrats and Republicans dance a delicate dance in the hopes that neither party jeopardizes the agreement. The proposal by a Senate "Gang of Eight" creates a path to citizenship for 11 million people living in the US without documentation, creates a more secure border and, the GOP hopes, could reshape the political calculations of a growing segment of the electorate. We look at the policy and the politics of immigration reform with University of Washington pollster Matt Barreto.

In his new book author Charles Wheelen makes the claim that statistics can be really interesting, and most of it isn't that difficult. Not convinced? Ross Reynolds lets Charles Wheelen makes his case and tries to get to the fun part of statistical data.

Wall Street skyscrapers
Michael Aston / Flickr

    

  What can physics teach us about finance? A great deal according to physicist and mathematician James Owen Weatherall. He says markets can be understood, and to a degree even predicted, by using principles of physics. Ross Reynolds talks to professor Weatherall about what physics can teach us about Wall Street.

Where you decide to live is more important than your resume in determining your salary. That's according to Berkeley economist Enrico Moretti. He'll tell us about where to live if you want to be healthy and wealthy.

Sheri Collins and her dog
Liz Jones

On Sunday nights, you can find Graham Pruss under the Ballard Bridge, serving up a hot meal. A recent menu included ham and potato soup, locally baked bread and apple cobbler. He calls this weekly dinner a bridge to connect with people who live in their cars. They’re often referred to as car campers or mobile homeless, but Pruss prefers the term, vehicle residents.

Pruss is one of many homeless advocates who’s pushed Seattle to provide more services to this group of people. In response, last year the city launched the “safe parking” program, which opens up church lots where people can park and connect to housing services. The pilot program is modestly increasing this year, in a step toward what advocates hope will be a citywide expansion. 

Rita T / Flickr

By 2030, seniors will make up more than 20 percent of Washington state’s population.  Are we ready to care for the elderly? What’s it going to mean for federal programs like Medicare?  Ross interviews economist Dean Baker and labor activist Ai’jen  Poo.

Victoria Times-Colonist columnist Les Leyne brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton shares some of the movie offerings at Seattle's newly reopened Museum of History and Industry. Then, Michael Parks looks at Amazon's big 2012, Microsoft's make-or-break 2013 and what Boeing's backlog means for the region's employment.

Congress Reaches A Deal On Fiscal Cliff

Jan 2, 2013

The House voted 257-167 late last night to pass the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012. The bill now goes to the President, but sets up another confrontation over taxes and spending in just weeks. We check in with Jill Jackson of CBS News and hear from Representative Jim McDermott about why he voted against the deal.

Even as Air Force One was about to land in suburban Maryland this morning — bringing President Obama back from his vacation in Hawaii to resume negotiations aimed at avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff of automatic tax increases and spending cuts — Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid was on the floor of the Senate warning that a dive off that cliff seems inevitable.

Top Canadian News In 2012

Dec 26, 2012
The Canadian flag.
Flickr Photo/Christopher Policarpio (CC BY 2.0)

Vaughn Palmer joins us to take a look back at the big stories in Canada. From the pipeline proposals to the appointment of a Canadian to be head of the Bank of England to the hockey strike, we will look back on Canada's year.

King County Department of Assessments

Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn and Seattle City Councilmember Nick Licata announced Wednesday the city will spend $19.5 million for construction and renovation of 570 new low-income housing units. It's part of an effort to ease the trend of low-income families moving out of the city.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Robert Horton reflects on the best holiday films. Then, we review the latest economic news with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton.

Image Courtesy/Vulcan

The Seattle City Council is debating a plan that would transform a huge swath of the city’s center, and that for the first time would allow developers to build residential high rises just a block from Lake Union.

US Department of Labor / Flickr

In the other Washington, lawmakers are still trying to reach a deal to avoid the "fiscal cliff," a series of sharp tax increases and spending cuts taking effect January 1. House Speaker John Boehner and President Obama spoke on the phone yesterday, a day after the president offered to reduce his initial demand for $1.6 trillion in higher tax revenue over a decade to $1.4 trillion.

Obama wants much of the revenue to come from raising tax rates on the wealthy. House Speaker John Boehner has accused the White House of stalling the negotiations. Central to a final settlement is Washington’s senior senator, Patty Murray. Ross Reynolds speaks with Senator Patty Murray about the looming fiscal cliff.

Christopher Clow
Carolyn Adolph / KUOW

Correction: This story has been corrected to show that of the 120,000 people who were cut off unemployment benefits before they found a job from summer to 2008 to November 2012, 70 percent have not yet found work.

A program Congress has extended 10 times over the last four years is expected to end this month. The emergency unemployment compensation program has been a safety net for 400,000 people in Washington since the summer of 2008. Four years later 70 percent of people who were cut off from benefits before they found work are still looking. That's about 84,000 people.

Jeff Rubin was a high-flying economist at a major Canadian investment bank, until he decided to write a book about how high oil prices were going to flatten the global economy.  Ross Reynolds talks Jeff Rubin about the steadily mounting demand for cheap oil in a world of dwindling supply.

The New Freelance Economy

Nov 29, 2012

Up to one-third of working adults in the United States are independent contractors. Do you have what it takes to make it on your own? Freelancers Union founder Sara Horowitz joins us to talk about how independent workers are changing the national job landscape and what you need to know before joining the ranks of the self-employed.

Nosferatu
Wikipedia

Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer explores how Washington state's election results would effect British Columbia and Canada, Robert Horton talks scary movies, and Michael Parks reviews the latest economic numbers.

HOQUIAM, Wash. – Nearly 300,000 people in Washington are still unemployed and looking for work. But there was reason to celebrate Monday in coastal Grays Harbor County – where the unemployment rate is tied for the highest in the state. A shuttered paper mill there recently roared back to life. With it came 175 jobs.

It was a party atmosphere inside the long, narrow shipping warehouse at Harbor Paper. Several hundred people milled about as dignitaries, including Governor Chris Gregoire, mounted a makeshift stage.

Halloween Spending Up Across Nation

Oct 31, 2012

KENNEWICK, Wash. – If Halloween spending is an indicator of the economy, Americans are appear to be feeling better than this time last year -- or at least more ghoulish.

A new survey commissioned by the National Retail Federation found that seven of 10 Americans will celebrate Halloween this year. And they’re spending more says spokeswoman Kathy Grannis.

“The average person is expected to spend about $79 on Halloween decorations, costumes and candy.”

Vaughn Palmer
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the news from Canada, we look at what’s happening at the movies with film critic Robert Horton, and The Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton reviews the latest economic news.

Paul Krugman
Center for American Progress

New York Times columnist Paul Krugman explains why he believes we are in a depression and how a massive government investment could get us out of it. Ross Reynolds interviewed Paul Krugman in front of a live studio audience, May 24, 2012. 

Paul Krugman is a Nobel Prize-winning economist and he writes The Conscience of a Liberal blog for the New York Times. 

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