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economy

'To Have A Place Where I Can Have Food'

May 27, 2014
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

The Census Bureau estimates Seattle grew faster than any other major American city last year. As more people move here, the pressure is on to find an affordable home.

Thinking Like A Freak, Economically Speaking

May 23, 2014
KUOW Photo

Arwen Nicks talks with best selling authors Steven Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner about their most recent book, "Think Like A Freak."

Nomi Prins' new book, "All the Presidents' Bankers"

In Nomi Prins' new book "All the Presidents' Bankers," she delves into over a century of close ties between the White House and Wall Street. Using archival correspondence, she explores the ways a small group of influential people, elected and not, has shaped American policy at home and abroad. The book details economic expansion, contraction and crises from the panic of 1907 to today, in the context of what Prins calls America’s genealogy of power.

Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos

Ross Reynolds talks with economist Dean Baker about why the way we talk about numbers is wrong, and how we can do it better.

Flickr Photo/Robert Fairchild (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the latest news from Canada.

We’ve all heard of the Western Gold Rush. But how about the Northwest cattle rush?

Flickr Photo/David Prasad (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Seattle Times business columnist Jon Talton about the economic climate of Snohomish County — with and without Boeing's business.

In what’s usually the busiest home-buying season, mortgage lending dropped to its lowest level in 14 years and purchases of new homes sank 14.5 percent.

Some of the factors: mortgage rates have ticked up and investors who snapped up homes last year have retreated. What’s in store for the near future of the housing market?

Tom LaMalfa, an economist and contributor to Mortgage Banking Magazine, discusses this with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Flickr Photo/Tax Credits (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about the growing income gap between CEOs and workers.

Flickr Photo/Victoria Pickering

The latest figures show the unemployment rate in Washington state is holding steady at 6.3 percent. The Employment Security Department said the state added an estimated 6,700 jobs in March. The biggest job gains last month were seen in professional and business services.

Jeremy Rifkin's latest book, "The Zero Marginal Cost Society."

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeremy Rifkin about his new book, "The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism."

Flickr Photo/Charles Spurr (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton about the challenges facing the maritime industry in the Pacific Northwest.

Tyler Cowen's book "Average is Over."

Here in the Puget Sound region and across the country, the economy is making slow and steady progress in recovering from the Great Recession of 2008. But moving forward, many questions still remain. A crucial one involves the growing inequality gap. Economist Tyler Cowen says the U.S. will return to historic levels of inequality and in turn, we'll see a thinning out of the middle class.

His latest book is called “Average Is Over: Powering America Beyond The Age Of The Great Stagnation.” Cowen talked with Marcie Sillman.

Washington state's unemployment rate held steady in February at 6.4 percent according to fresh numbers from the state Employment Security Department.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Sounders FC soccer team played their first Major League Soccer game five years ago Wednesday. In that time, the team’s fans have broken attendance records over and over.

But has the team’s financial success trickled down into the community? It depends on who you ask.

Flickr Photo/401(K) 2012 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with economist David Neumark at the University of California, Irvine, about what key issues Seattle needs to address before raising its minimum wage.

Zachary Karabell's "The Leading Indicators."

David Hyde talks with Zachary Karabell, head of Global Strategy at the financial services firm Envestnet, about why we shouldn't use the unemployment rate to inform public policy.

Karabell is also the author "The Leading Indicators: A Short History of the Numbers That Rule Our World."

EarthFix Photo/Cassandra Profita

Mark Elston followed his father into the timber industry back when business was booming.

"When I started, you could really mess things up and still make good money," he said. "You can't do that anymore."

It took four years, but Washington has now recovered more jobs than it lost during the Great Recession.

Tim Harford's book "The Undercover Economist Strikes Back"

Ross Reynolds talks with Tim Harford, Financial Times columnist and author, about his new book "The Undercover Economist Strikes Back: How to Run – or Ruin – an Economy." 

The book focuses on the work of macroeconomists and how they believe that tweaking the right dials can steer our economy away from danger. Harford also offers a macroeconomic perspective for Seattle's on-going minimum wage debate.

Larry Jametsky, Christina Stewart and their son Lawrence outside the home they say they lost in a fraudulent loan deal in Feb. 2014.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Larry Jametsky visits his family home frequently, even though he was evicted from it almost four years ago.

He and his family have been homeless since then, but they’ve stayed near the blue house in the city of SeaTac. “This was my grandparents’ house, my dad’s house,” Jametsky said.

Flickr Photo/Antana (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Imagine using online banking – without the bank.

Bitcoin is a digital currency that was created five years ago. It runs entirely on the sways of the free market: no government or banking institution is backing it.

2013: A Good Year For West Coast Lumber and Log Exports

Feb 25, 2014

West Coast log and lumber exports rose sharply in 2013 as Asian demand for American logs increased, according to new research from the U.S. Forest Service.

The region's lumber and log exports rose about 20 percent last year, with demand peaking in the fourth quarter.

Most of the West Coast logs shipped overseas are going to China -- although Japan has upped its demand, as well. With limited forestlands of their own, these countries rely on the United States’ timber supply.

Flickr Photo/401(K) 2012 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Ron Unz, a Silicon Valley millionaire and conservative activist, about why he thinks Republicans and the nation as a whole would benefit from a $12 minimum wage.

Workers and labor activists demonstrate outside the U.S. District Courthouse in support of the city's $15 an hour minimum wage
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Ross Reynolds talks with Howard Wright, co-chair of Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's Income Inequality Advisory Committee, about the status of its proposal to the mayor.

Flickr Photo/Nicholas Bonanno

David Hyde talks with Ben White, chief economic correspondent for POLITICO, about the wealthiest Americans' fears over their future stability.

New numbers for December from the Washington state employment department peg the current jobless rate at 6.6 percent. The last time it was lower was in November 2008.

Flickr/401 (K) 2012 (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with economist Dean Baker about why tax rates for wealthy Americans are going up and how that could impact economic disparity.

How Much Is Your Mother Worth?

Jan 10, 2014
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds talks with professional hacker and author Joshua Klein about why who you know is more valuable than what you have.

What Exactly Does The Head Of The Fed Do?

Jan 7, 2014
Flickr Photo/Tim Evanson

Ross Reynolds talks to Washington Post Economics columnist Neil Irwin about what the The Federal Reserve System is and what exactly the chair of the Fed does.

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