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economy

Illegal Sex And Drugs Pay Off For Britain

Dec 29, 2014

Normally we wouldn't give much thought to the fact that Britain has surpassed France as the world's fifth-largest economy. But this story caught our attention: It was the way in which Britain snagged the higher spot.

A trip across the border to Canada could have an added appeal right now with an exchange rate that has turned quite favorable for Americans. But this cuts two ways.

According to AAA, the last three months have been the longest stretch of declining gas prices they’ve ever recorded in the U.S.

Washington and Oregon's latest unemployment numbers offer a paradox.

Is Amazon Really Too Big?

Nov 10, 2014
Amazon.com logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Felix Salmon, financial commentator and senior editor for news network Fusion, about Seattle's e-commerce giant, Amazon, and what happens when one company makes it big time. 

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about what the recent election results could mean for Washington state's economy.

Ross Reynolds talks with Tom Allison, policy and research manager for the Millennial advocacy group Young Invincibles, about youth employment in the United States.

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

So your child moved back in with you after graduation, and it seems like she will never leave. Or worse, you're sending rent checks each month while she searches for jobs in the big city.

You often find yourself wondering if she will ever grow up. You're concerned that your child is suffering from delayed adolescence.

Job growth stalled during September in Oregon and Washington according to new numbers from the respective state employment departments.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for the Seattle Times, about factors that could slow down the current Seattle economic boom.

The Chinese real estate developer Landsea plans to invest $1 billion in the U.S. housing market, according to the company. “The Chinese housing market is slowing down. In the U.S., it’s coming up,” said John Ho, managing director of Landsea’s U.S. subsidiary, yesterday.

Michael Regan of Bloomberg News spoke to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about how the developer will start with three projects — one in California’s Simi Valley, another near San Francisco and a third outside of Manhattan.

Ross Reynolds talks to Seattle Times economic columnist Jon Talton about the antitrust probe China has filed against Microsoft. Also, who will move to Federal Way now that Weyerhaeuser is moving to Pioneer Square?

Marcie Sillman talks with St. Lawrence University economist Steven Horwitz about new bartering exchanges and how they compare to bartering of the past.

Buffalo Abandoned Homes Selling For $1

Aug 19, 2014

Like many cities, Buffalo, New York, is facing a glut of abandoned homes and lots. There are roughly 16,000 vacant lots and 4,500 vacant homes throughout the city.

Instead of tearing the homes down, city officials are selling them for $1. They’re calling it the Urban Homestead Program. The program requires that residents have the ability to make necessary repairs, and commit to living in the home for at least three years.

Online rental brokers like Airbnb, VRBO and Flipkey in San Francisco may be finding some success renting to visitors on a nightly basis, but people concerned about a shrinking rental market have turned to legal action and protests.

In the city's North Beach neighborhood, for example, protesters recently gathered around a three-unit apartment with flats an online broker rents to vacationers. This used to be the rent-controlled home of elderly tenants until out-of-town investors bought the building and evicted the residents.

Amgen is moving out, and Expedia is moving into Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Chas Redmond (CC-BY-NC-ND)

California-based biotech firm Amgen announced on Tuesday that it would close its Seattle and Bothell campuses by 2015, resulting in the loss of 660 jobs locally. The closure is part of a company-wide layoff of an estimated 2,400 to 2,900.

From Ubrlocal's Facebook page

Ross Reynolds talks with Kamal Patel, co-founder of Ubrlocal, a marketplace for Seattle gardeners and farmers to share their wares.

Microsoft sign on the company's Redmond, Washington campus.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1NM853Z

Last week, Microsoft began the biggest layoffs in the company’s history: 18,000 total expected in the next year. So far, about 1,300 local workers have been affected.

Jon Talton, business reporter for the Seattle Times, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds on The Record that this event is a test for the local economy. He said the Seattle area is in the midst of an economic boom – driven by Amazon, Boeing’s 777X and 737, increased exports and low unemployment.

In an already pricey real estate market, San Francisco’s median home price has just hit the $1 million mark, according to a new report from industry info firm DataQuick.

To figure out what’s going on in the city by the bay, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson turns to Nancy Wallace, co-chair of the Fisher Center for Real Estate and Urban Economics at the University of California, Berkeley.

According to the June jobs report released Wednesday, Washington’s jobless rate has dropped to 5.8 percent -- the lowest level in six years.

Ross Reynolds talks with economist and real estate analyst Matthew Gardner about the commercial real estate market in Seattle.

Ross Reynolds talks with Lew Daly, director of policy and research at Demos, a public policy think tank in New York. In a report released this month, Daly said our method of measuring gross domestic product obscures public value in our economy.

Citigroup said Monday it had agreed to pay $7 billion to settle a federal investigation into subprime mortgages it sold in the run-up to the financial meltdown of 2008.

The deal covers mortgage-backed securities and collateralized debt obligations issued, structured or underwritten by Citi between 2003 and 2008, the company said in a statement on its website.

Trust In The Age Of The Sharing Economy

Jul 9, 2014

Until recently, there were a few gems of conventional wisdom followed by most: don’t get into a stranger’s car; don’t open your door to someone you don’t know; don’t lend out your valuables. Well, those rules — and so many more — are being upended by the way we’re now living.

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton about the paper's annual report on executive pay. In addition, the two discuss how jobs in America have shifted to service jobs.

Washington State Department Of Transportation Photo

Traffic jams have plagued the Seattle area for weeks. Now a traffic data company reports that congestion has been getting worse even before the traffic snarls of the last few weeks. 

Flickr Photo/Senate Democrats (CC-BY-NC-ND)

This week on Speakers Forum, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren tells the story of her life and her vision of a progressive America. Warren is known as an advocate for consumer protection. She was largely responsible for the hard-won establishment of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

From DESC's Facebook page.

David Hyde talks with Bill Hobson, executive director of Downtown Emergency Service Center, about how his organization would implement the $15 minimum wage and why he's advocating that the city help.

Ross Reynolds talks to Giovanni Peri, an economics professor at U.C. Davis, about how foreign-born workers in science and technology might affect the health of economies. Peri argues that the federal government should increase the cap on H-1B worker visas, which would ultimately encourage economic growth and innovation.

Flickr Photo/Downing Street (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The financial crisis of 2008 is widely referred to as the worst fiscal disaster since the Great Depression of the 1930s. It threatened large financial institutions with collapse and resulted in bank bailouts and downturns in stock and housing markets around the world.

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