economy

EarthFix Photo/Cassandra Profita

Mark Elston followed his father into the timber industry back when business was booming.

"When I started, you could really mess things up and still make good money," he said. "You can't do that anymore."

It took four years, but Washington has now recovered more jobs than it lost during the Great Recession.

Tim Harford's book "The Undercover Economist Strikes Back"

Ross Reynolds talks with Tim Harford, Financial Times columnist and author, about his new book "The Undercover Economist Strikes Back: How to Run – or Ruin – an Economy." 

The book focuses on the work of macroeconomists and how they believe that tweaking the right dials can steer our economy away from danger. Harford also offers a macroeconomic perspective for Seattle's on-going minimum wage debate.

Larry Jametsky, Christina Stewart and their son Lawrence outside the home they say they lost in a fraudulent loan deal in Feb. 2014.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Larry Jametsky visits his family home frequently, even though he was evicted from it almost four years ago.

He and his family have been homeless since then, but they’ve stayed near the blue house in the city of SeaTac. “This was my grandparents’ house, my dad’s house,” Jametsky said.

Flickr Photo/Antana (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Imagine using online banking – without the bank.

Bitcoin is a digital currency that was created five years ago. It runs entirely on the sways of the free market: no government or banking institution is backing it.

2013: A Good Year For West Coast Lumber and Log Exports

Feb 25, 2014

West Coast log and lumber exports rose sharply in 2013 as Asian demand for American logs increased, according to new research from the U.S. Forest Service.

The region's lumber and log exports rose about 20 percent last year, with demand peaking in the fourth quarter.

Most of the West Coast logs shipped overseas are going to China -- although Japan has upped its demand, as well. With limited forestlands of their own, these countries rely on the United States’ timber supply.

Flickr Photo/401(K) 2012 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Ron Unz, a Silicon Valley millionaire and conservative activist, about why he thinks Republicans and the nation as a whole would benefit from a $12 minimum wage.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Ross Reynolds talks with Howard Wright, co-chair of Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's Income Inequality Advisory Committee, about the status of its proposal to the mayor.

Flickr Photo/Nicholas Bonanno

David Hyde talks with Ben White, chief economic correspondent for POLITICO, about the wealthiest Americans' fears over their future stability.

New numbers for December from the Washington state employment department peg the current jobless rate at 6.6 percent. The last time it was lower was in November 2008.

Flickr/401 (K) 2012 (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with economist Dean Baker about why tax rates for wealthy Americans are going up and how that could impact economic disparity.

How Much Is Your Mother Worth?

Jan 10, 2014
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds talks with professional hacker and author Joshua Klein about why who you know is more valuable than what you have.

What Exactly Does The Head Of The Fed Do?

Jan 7, 2014
Flickr Photo/Tim Evanson

Ross Reynolds talks to Washington Post Economics columnist Neil Irwin about what the The Federal Reserve System is and what exactly the chair of the Fed does.

Flickr Photo/Henry Alva (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde discusses with economics columnist Jon Talton Boeing and Microsoft's big decisions and how they will effect the Puget Sound economy in 2014.

Portugal's Baby Bust Is A Stark Sign Of Hard Times

Jan 2, 2014

In Lisbon, the waiting area of Portugal's biggest maternity hospital is empty. You can hear the hum of soda machines across the hall. There's just one expectant father, pacing the room.

Mario Carvalho, 40, has a toddler son and now awaits the birth of his baby girl.

"Today, I hope!" he says with a nervous smile.

The birth of a new baby is a joyous occasion. But in Portugal, it's an increasingly rare one. Since the economic crisis hit, the country's birthrate has dropped 14 percent, to less than 1.3 babies per woman — one of the lowest in the world.

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