Ebola

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Joint Base Lewis-McChord south of Seattle is one of five bases nationwide that will keep troops returning from West Africa in a controlled monitoring environment for 21 days after they return.

Ross Reynolds talks with Jasper Kinnay, a community leader with the Liberian Association of Washington State, about how Washington residents from Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and other African countries are working to send food and supplies to Ebola-stricken areas.

Each day now, travelers are arriving home to the Northwest who may have been exposed to Ebola. In Oregon, a woman who has come back from West Africa was just hospitalized Friday with a fever. 

Flickr Photo/Joannie Grebe (CC-BY-NC)

The Ebola nurse in Maine: rational or selfish? Is it ever OK to be sarcastic right after a school shooting? Does a confusing ballot mean an unpredictable election? Plus, Bill Radke explodes over leaf blowers. All these topics and more are discussed with this week's guests: Knute Berger, Eli Sanders and Joni Balter.

This is a week for reflecting on lessons learned from those who've survived Ebola.

Morning Edition aired a report on the experience of medical personnel at Emory Hospital, which has cared for four Ebola patients: three evacuees from West Africa (including Dr. Kent Brantly) and one of the Texas nurses.

Maine's Gov. Paul LePage says he will seek to legally force a nurse to undergo a 21-day quarantine after her return from West Africa, where she volunteered to treat Ebola patients.

Across the Northwest medical professionals are getting ready for Ebola.

Ebola screening for passengers flying out of Monrovia's airport on Monday night wasn't functioning like a well-oiled machine. Parts of it were chaotic and slightly concerning.

After 10 days of reporting in Liberia, we arrived at the airport to take two of the same flights that Thomas Eric Duncan took last month: Monrovia to Brussels and then on to Dulles in Virginia. There were three of us: me, another reporter and a producer.

Before we went inside the terminal, a woman from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention greeted us outside.

When Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, hugged Dallas nurse Nina Pham on Friday it was as much to combat the stigma surrounding the deadly virus as to celebrate her being free of Ebola.

Fauci said it was an honor to treat Pham and get to know "such an extraordinary individual." Pham said she felt "fortunate and blessed" and put her trust "in God and my medical team."

Pham later met with President Obama in the Oval Office. The president and the nurse also hugged as news photographers captured the moment.

Health officials are saying it. Scientists are saying it. Heck, even many journalists are saying it: "The risk of Ebola infection remains vanishingly small in this country," The New York Times wrote Wednesday.

But what does that mean? Are you more likely to be struck by lightning or catch Ebola?

When Ebola began killing people in the Monrovia suburb of Clara Town several months ago, some residents blamed vaccines.

One vaccinator in the town says mothers didn't want her near their babies.

"They had a notion that when the people come to the hospital, we would inject them and kill them," says vaccinator Che Che Richardson at the Clara Town Health Center, "because it was the hospital giving the people Ebola."

Rumors like that, combined with the closing of many health facilities, have caused childhood vaccination rates to plummet in Liberia.

Saturday, the 21st of September, is a day I will never forget in my life.

I was out working with MSF [Medecins Sans Frontieres/Doctors Without Borders] as a health promotion officer in Foya, in the north of Liberia, visiting villages and telling people about Ebola: how to protect themselves and their families, what to do if they start to develop symptoms and making sure everyone has the MSF hotline number to call.

Later that night, my brother called me. "Your wife has died." I said, "What?" He said, "Bendu is dead."

Aviation expert Mary Schiavo thinks the U.S. government should implement a travel ban on the approximately 150 passengers entering the U.S. every day from West African nations affected by Ebola. Her reason: Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man who became the first person to be diagnosed in the U.S. with Ebola, who died from the virus.

Where Did The Week Go? (It Wasn't Nowhere)

Oct 17, 2014
Courtesy of Greg Plumis

Seattle’s "ramps to nowhere" are coming down this weekend. Where should they land? Also, a critical care nurse at Harborview is preparing to treat Ebola, and a Seattle woman turned her camera on an alleged groper and found out there was more to him. Plus, who gets to hassle the King County Executive via text?

All these topics and more get discussed with Bill Radke’s panel this week: Joni Balter, C.R. Douglas and Republican consultant Chris Vance.

Ron Klain, a former White House adviser, has been appointed to head U.S. efforts to combat Ebola.

A White House official says Klain "will report directly to the president's Homeland Security Adviser Lisa Monaco and ... National Security Adviser Susan Rice as he ensures that efforts to protect the American people by detecting, isolating and treating Ebola patients in this country are properly integrated but don't distract from the aggressive commitment to stopping Ebola at the source in West Africa."

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