early childhood education

Little children are big news this week, as the White House holds a summit on early childhood education on Wednesday. The president wants every 4-year-old to go to preschool, but the new Congress is unlikely to foot that bill.

Since last year, more than 30 states have expanded access to preschool. But there's still a lack of evidence about exactly what kinds of interventions are most effective in those crucial early years.

This fall, Seattle voters will choose between two early childhood education ballot initiatives. If you want to weigh in on the issue, you'll have to pick a favorite – even if you want neither to pass. KUOW Education Reporter Ann Dornfeld gives us the latest on the two competing ballot initiatives .

Flickr Photo/a.pasquier

The Seattle City Council voted on Monday to send two competing early childhood education initiatives to voters this fall. One initiative was proposed by council President Tim Burgess and Mayor Ed Murray, and the other by a union that represents child care workers.

For years, President Obama has been a vocal booster of early childhood education. In his past two State of the Union addresses, he has called on Congress to help fund preschool for every child in the country.

"Research shows that one of the best investments we can make in a child's life is high-quality early education," Obama told Congress in January.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

The city of Seattle would create a plan to let all children attend preschool for free or on a sliding scale under a resolution proposed by City Councilman Tim Burgess.

brewbooks / Flickr

  Two Seattle Head Start programs have lost their federal funding after they failed to meet quality standards. It's the first round of contract terminations in the new push by the Obama administration to improve the early learning programs for low-income kids.

The president’s proposal to improve quality and accessibility of preschools includes a cost-sharing partnership with all 50 states. Federal funds would go to expand high-quality public preschools, open to low- and moderate-income four-year-olds from families at or below 200 percent the poverty level.