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Donald Trump

Updated 5:35 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is moving to roll back an environmental rule intended to define which small bodies of water are subject to federal authority under the Clean Water Act.

President Donald Trump’s immigration policies created a sense of urgency at the annual Latino Legislative Day the Washington state Capitol Monday. Several hundred activists converged in Olympia, Washington, with a message for state lawmakers.

school desk
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Kim Malcolm talks with Lincoln High School teacher Nathan Gibbs-Bowling about the struggles of students who are affected by President Trump's immigration policies. Gibbs-Bowling is organizing a town hall tonight for Tacoma educators.

President Trump's initial budget proposal isn't enough to expand the military in the way he proposed.

Trump campaigned on the need to add tens of thousands more troops to the Army and Marine Corps, field a Navy with 350 warships or more and also to upgrade the Air Force. The $54 billion he's seeking to increase the Defense Department budget this year would represent a funding boost — but not one that would pay for an expansion on the scale Trump endorsed.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee used words like “shocked” and “troubled” after attending events with President Donald Trump and members of his administration in Washington, D.C., in recent days. And the Democrat said he’s “more concerned,” not less concerned, after meeting with Trump Monday.

It started out a simple, human interest story featuring a former president and his post-White House hobby — painting watercolors of world leaders, and now, portraits of American soldiers, wounded during military service.

Amy Radil

Being a Daffodil Princess in Pierce County is not about winning a pageant. Kelty Pierce, 19, is emphatic on that point.

As President Trump prepares a new executive order on vetting refugees and immigrants, one idea keeps cropping up: checking the social media accounts of those coming to the U.S.

In fact, such a program was begun under the Obama administration more than a year ago on a limited basis and is likely to be expanded. But social media vetting is a heavy lift, and it's too early to tell how effective it will be.

President Trump signed an executive action on Friday aimed at reducing red tape. It directs each federal agency to set up a task force to identify costly regulations that could be scaled back.

"Every regulation should have to pass a simple test," Trump said. "Does it make life better or safer for American workers or consumers? If the answer is no, we will be getting rid of it — and getting rid of it quickly."

South Lake Union neighborhood, home to many Seattle tech companies
Flickr Photo/Ted Eytan (CC BY-SA-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/agMkfy

Kim Malcolm talks with Puget Sound Business Journal reporter Ashley Stewart about Tuesday's immigration inspection of the Redmond cloud company Sysgain. Some lawyers are worried that immigration raids of tech firms will become more common under the Trump administration.

The White House is admitting that it discussed with the FBI media reports that Trump campaign officials were in contact with Russian intelligence agents and that Chief of Staff Reince Priebus asked the FBI to publicly knock down the story.

FBI Director James Comey refused.

Farm in Skagit Valley, WA
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As the Trump administration rolls out new rules on immigration enforcement this week, a bipartisan coalition of business leaders and mayors has launched a new data project that highlights the economic impact of immigrants in the United States.

Courtesy of James Allen Smith

Bill Radke speaks with filmmaker James Allen Smith about his latest project to meet Trump supporters. Smith recently drove his Prius from Seattle to Lynden to talk with people who voted for Trump. He is posting those conversation on his YouTube channel

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Thursday in response to President Donald Trump’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants. The Democrat said the state will not participate in “mean-spirited policies” on immigration.

On Wednesday, the Trump administration made big news regarding the rights of transgender students. But what exactly changed?

Danni Askini, the executive director of the Gender Justice League.
Courtesy of Danielle Askini

Washington state won't be directly affected by President Donald Trump's new policy about transgender students.

The administration said Wednesday that states should decide whether trans students should be allowed to use school bathrooms that match their gender identity, reversing guidelines issued by then President Obama.

This week, Trump’s Department of Homeland Security announced an aggressive plan to deport people who are in the United States illegally and who run afoul of the law.

On a visit to Olympia on Wednesday, U.S. Senator Patty Murray described the policy as “very wrongheaded.”

Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race, his comments on illegal immigration have been pored over in the press — from vows to deport millions of people to promises that any enforcement plan would have "a lot of heart." Observers asked, again and again, how rhetoric would translate into actual policy.

Now activists and experts have the policies themselves to examine.

Flowers outside Jewish Federation Building commemorate the 2006 hate-crime shooting .
Flickr Photo/Belltown Messenger (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4ysFZA

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump spoke out against anti-Semitic threats and incidents, calling them "horrible" and "painful." That's after passing up a couple of chances to do so since he became president.

Nancy Greer, the president and CEO of the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle, told KUOW's David Hyde at least it's a start.

  

President Donald Trump
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Bill Radke talks to former Congressman Jim McDermott and former chairman of the Washington State Republican Party Chris Vance about the first 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency. They discuss immigration, Russia and the future of the Republican Party.  

In April 1991, I met a young U.S. Army captain in the moonscape of southern Iraq. He was frustrated.

Just weeks earlier, the officer and his troops had been part of the wave of U.S. forces that drove Saddam Hussein's Iraqi military out of Kuwait. The Americans kept advancing, pushing some 150 miles into southern Iraq — but then they received orders to halt in place.

Several Jewish community centers across the U.S. were targeted by bomb threats on Monday, according to the JCC Association of North America, in the fourth wave of such threats in the past two months.

In total, there have been 69 threats at 54 JCCs, in 27 states and a Canadian province, the organization reports — including previous threats on Jan. 9, 18 and 31, as well as 11 threats by telephone on Monday.

Day Without Immigrants rally in Washington, D.C., February 16, 2017
Flickr Photo/Lorie Shaull (CC BY-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/RXtwud

Blanca Rodriguez owns the Greenbridge Cafe in Seattle. On Thursday, she closed her doors to take part in A Day Without Immigrants, a national campaign that encouraged immigrants to stay home from work and school, close their businesses, and not go shopping.


Refugees are freezing to flee the US for Canada

Feb 17, 2017

Winters in Canada get cold. Really, really cold.

So people would have to be pretty desperate to walk across the wide expanses of deep snow separating Canada from the US.

But that’s what’s happening.

The GOP put out a survey Thursday night that's enough to make a social scientist cringe.

It's called the "Mainstream Media Accountability Survey," but this "survey" commits a variety of polling sins.

It contains:

-- Leading questions ("Do you believe that the mainstream media does not do their due diligence fact-checking before publishing stories on the Trump administration?"),

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Courtesy of the Krump family 

Since Kristina Krump and her husband, Nicholas, started dating, they’ve dreamed about leaving Phoenix to live abroad, maybe after sending their last child to college, or in retirement. In the meantime, they and their three boys spend a month every summer in Latin America.

Last year, the family went to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. It was a welcome break, Kristina Krump said, from US politics and bad news.

More than two months after he publicly criticized Boeing over the costs of a new Air Force One, President Trump visited one of the aircraft company's newest facilities Friday: a plant in North Charleston, S.C., where the company will unveil a new version of its 787 Dreamliner.

Americans have complained for years about presidential campaigns that start too early and last too long.

Now, they are confronted with one that refuses to end — even after reaching the White House.

There may never be a "last word" written or spoken about President Trump's 77-minute barrage in the East Room Thursday, but the first word from many was: "Wow."

Bill Radke speaks with three Trump voters — Marcy Ann Ritchie, Forrest Taylor and Lori Theis — who don't quite fit the stereotype of those who voted for President Trump. They explain why they support the president, what they hope will happen under this administration and how they feel they've been unfairly maligned and pigeonholed for their beliefs. 

The Washington State Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that a florist who declined to do flowers for a same-sex wedding broke the state’s anti-discrimination law. But the same-sex couple who won the case, isn’t celebrating too enthusiastically just yet.

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