Donald Trump | KUOW News and Information

Donald Trump

Donald Trump, the man who would not run, could not be taken seriously and could not win, is the apparent nominee of the Republican Party.

The office in question is the presidency of the United States.

Don Trump, left, and his wife Phyllis Trump at an event in Des Moines, Washington, to end hunger. They have attended the event for 27 years.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Donald L. Trump of Des Moines, Washington, doesn’t have a red cap.

“I don’t have the hair, the money or the big mouth,” he says.

Ted Cruz raised the most money of any Republican presiddential candidate in Washington state.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Candidates who raise the most money tend to win elections.

But not always.

Republican Senator Ted Cruz was scheduled to speak at a rally in Spokane and a fundraiser in Redmond on Wednesday and at a rally in Bothell on Thursday.

But he dropped out of the presidential race Tuesday night after Donald Trump's big win in Indiana.

The Indiana voters shook up the presidential race Tuesday night, with Ted Cruz ending his campaign after a disappointing loss to now-likely GOP nominee Donald Trump.

Bernie Sanders also bounced back after a string of primary losses with a surprise win over Hillary Clinton. But the Democrat's 5-point win still won't be enough to close the yawning gap between the two.

Cruz exit clears the way for likely Trump nomination

Why Donald Trump could be good for America

Apr 28, 2016
President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke speaks with University of Washington political science professor Christopher Parker about his prediction that Donald Trump will be the GOP presidential nominee and why that is a good thing for America. 

Barbara Hagstrom of Duvall shows off her Trump t-shirt at the 5th Legislative District GOP Caucus.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The Republican presidential contest is going to be heating up very quickly in Washington state.

All three GOP candidates have announced that they are coming here to campaign before the state's primary.

In this March 10, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich, right, speaks as Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, listens, during a Republican presidential debate.
AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File

Governor John Kasich and Senator Ted Cruz have joined forces to try and stop Donald Trump, sort of. 

They've struck a deal to not compete in three states: Kasich will not campaign in Indiana and Cruz will not campaign in New Mexico or Oregon. But the truce ends at the Washington state line.

Donald Trump wants the Republicans to alter the party platform on a fundamental issue for many conservative activists — abortion.

The GOP platform, which is formally adopted at the Republican National Convention, has included language every election year since 1984 with support for a human life amendment to the Constitution and a call for "legislation to make it clear that the Fourteenth Amendment's protections apply to unborn children."

(The 14th Amendment says no state shall "deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.")

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Kerry French, a Republican leader in Pierce County, campaigns for Ted Cruz, the presidential candidate, with a smart phone app.

Users earn “points” as they give information and get the word out. First comes a brief survey, which French demonstrated at a park in Lakewood, near her desk job at Camp Murray. 

“Would you describe yourself as evangelical? Yes. If I had to choose I’d probably say Tea Party-ish. Although Tea Party values are in our platform. So, Libertarian? Maybe a little.”

It has been a turbulent week for Mexico's diplomats in the U.S. The reason for the shakeup can be summed up in two words: Donald Trump.

This week, the Republican presidential front-runner released details of one of his oft-repeated campaign promises — to make Mexico pay for construction of a border wall.

The plan, which involves blocking billions of dollars that Mexicans working in the U.S. send back home, seemed to shake up Mexico's top officials and cause a break in their months of relative silence about Trump's anti-Mexican comments.

Barbara Hagstrom of Duvall shows off her Trump t-shirt at the 5th Legislative District GOP Caucus.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

It’s not at all clear who will win the Republican primary in Washington state next month —Donald Trump, Ted Cruz or John Kasich.

The first Trump tower? Donald Trump's grandfather, Frederick Trump, leased a business that offered "private rooms for ladies" in Seattle's red light district.
Puget Sound Regional Archives

Donald Trump, the presidential candidate, is 100 percent Queens. But his grandfather, Frederick Trump, built his nest egg in the Northwest.

Ross Reynolds interviews Mara Liasson at a KUOW event on March 31, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds interviews Mara Liasson, NPR’s national political correspondent. She’s covered presidential elections since 1992 and was  NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Bill Clinton administration. In this conversation on March 31, she talks about the dilemma Donald Trump poses the Republican Party and the prospects of a showdown between Trump and Hillary Clinton for president.

As it stands, Republican front-runner Donald Trump is about 60 percent of the way to the 1,237 delegates needed to clinch the GOP nomination before the Republican National Convention is held this July in Cleveland, but he cannot reach 100 percent of what he needs until the last day of primary voting in June.

Beginning with Tuesday's Wisconsin primary, if Trump banked every single delegate up for grabs in every single state, he would still enter the last day of the primary calendar short of the majority of delegates needed to clinch the nomination: 1,237.

According to Donald Trump, he's got an amazing relationship with women.

"I respect women. I love women. I cherish women!" Trump said at political conference last year, but it's a version of a line he repeats often on the campaign trail.

His poll numbers and recent comments, though, tell a slightly different story. Trump's favorability numbers with female voters are low enough that they could cause a problem for him should he be the candidate in the general election.

If someone tells you the same thing five times, you probably should believe he means it.

Back in August, Donald Trump and all the other Republican candidates were given the chance to say they would pledge support to whomever the Republican nominee would be — and not wage an independent bid for the presidency if he or she didn't win.

The GOP presidential field dropped by one candidate on Tuesday night, but Republicans are still no closer to uniting behind a nominee.

Democrats, however, did get more clarity as Hillary Clinton racked up more wins over Bernie Sanders, extending her delegate lead and complicating the Vermont senator's nomination calculation.

Five candidates for president weighed in on the violent clashes in Chicago at a planned Friday night rally for Republican frontrunner Donald Trump.

There's a first time for everything. That's certainly held true in this campaign dominated by Donald Trump.

And Republicans opposed to Trump are beginning to abandon the idea that Marco Rubio (or anyone else) can win a majority of delegates before the first round of balloting at this summer's GOP convention in Cleveland, where the party will officially pick its nominee.

House Speaker Paul Ryan said he "laughed out loud" at Donald Trump's Super Tuesday comment that the Wisconsin Republican would "pay a big price" if he couldn't work with him.

"Sometimes, reality is stranger than fiction around here these days," Ryan told reporters at his weekly press conference. The speaker said he watched Trump's comments from his office. Trump did not elaborate on his Ryan comment.

The most recent Republican presidential nominee is taking shots at Donald Trump's fitness to be president.

And he's not mincing his words.

Mitt Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, called the current GOP front-runner "a phony, a fraud" in a speech Thursday morning in Salt Lake City. And he didn't stop there.

Donald Trump picked up his first congressional endorsements this week, and today he scored another major backer: one of his former rivals, Chris Christie.

"I've gotten to know all the people on that stage. And there is no one who is better prepared to provide America with the strong leadership that it needs, both at home and around the world, than Donald Trump," the New Jersey governor said at a news conference in Fort Worth, Texas.

Donald Trump has won the Nevada Republican caucuses, giving the billionaire his third victory in two weeks and a huge surge of momentum heading into Super Tuesday.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio held a narrow but decisive lead for second place over Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. With all caucus votes in, Rubio had 23.9 percent to Cruz's 21.4 percent, according to the Associated Press.

But it was Trump who towered above his two top rivals, nearly doubling the support of his nearest competitor with 45.9 percent of the vote.

It was a Donald Trump moment straight out of The Apprentice.

Last Friday, the Republican-led Washington state Senate effectively said, "You're fired" to Secretary of Transportation Lynn Peterson.

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders won clear, early and decisive victories in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night.

Trump beat the GOP field by double digits. He got 35 percent of the vote, well ahead of surprise second-place finisher John Kasich, who pulled in 16 percent. Kasich was followed by Ted Cruz at 12 percent, Jeb Bush at 11 percent and Marco Rubio, who, after a poor debate performance Saturday, faded to fifth just shy of 11 percent.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

Tea Party darling Sarah Palin threw her support behind Donald Trump in a raucous speech Tuesday night, a blow to a surging Ted Cruz with less than two weeks to go until the Iowa caucuses.

Trump is "perfectly positioned to let you make America great again. Are you ready for that, Iowa?" Palin told a crowd in Ames, standing beside Trump. "No more pussyfooting around."

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