domestic violence

Marcie Sillman talks with Lan Pham, manager of the newly reinstated Seattle Office for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention, about how her experiences as a mother and a refugee will inform her tenure.

Commentator: Stop Talking About Hope Solo

Sep 24, 2014
Flickr Photo/Love @ll (CC-BY-NC-ND)

 Jeannie Yandel speaks with ESPNW columnist Kate Fagan about how the public and the media should treat the allegations of domestic abuse against Seattle Reign player Hope Solo, and what the charges mean in comparison to similar allegations against National Football League players.

AP Photo/Nick Wass, File

Marcie Sillman speaks with Merril Cousin, executive director of the King County Coalition Against Domestic Violence, about the complexities of celebrity and domestic violence.

Celebrity child autobiographies fall into two categories. There's the scorched earth approach: One sordid story after another — call it the "Mommie Dearest" syndrome.

The second category is the warts-and-all approach, in which the performer's progeny relates parental faults in oft-painful detail, but with the ultimate goal of deeper understanding. In many ways, the warts-and-all way is more challenging, because it requires the author to explain why — despite the horrors — they still loved Mom or Dad.

How Karate Helped Local Sensei Escape Abuse

Jun 11, 2014
Courtesy of Joni Sharrah

Joni Sharrah runs a dojo in Shoreline, north of Seattle. A teacher for 30 years, she knows that karate transcends punching and kicking. That's because experience has taught her that karate can save a person’s life – physically and emotionally.

Domestic violence affects a third of women worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. In many cases nobody knows of the suffering, and victims aren't able to get help in time.

That's why in many countries, including the U.S., there's been a push to make screening for domestic violence a routine part of doctor visits. Last year, the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended that clinicians ask all women of childbearing age whether they're being abused.

This Thursday, three Native American tribes are changing how they administer justice.

For almost four decades, a U.S. Supreme Court ruling has barred tribes from prosecuting non-American Indian defendants. But as part of last year's re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act, a new program now allows tribes to try some non-Indian defendants in domestic abuse cases.

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Tulalip Tribe Chairman Mel Sheldon about a federal pilot program that will allow the Tulalip Tribe to prosecute non-tribal members who are accused of domestic violence on the reservation.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The TV ad wars have begun in the Seattle mayor’s race.

This week, supporters of state Senator Ed Murray are running an ad that has some women’s advocates up in arms.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Police say a quadruple murder in Federal Way Sunday night started as a domestic violence incident.

Picture of a sculpture at the United Nations headquarters in New York City taken in 2010.
Flickr Photo/Sari Dennise (CC-BY-NC-ND)

In Washington state people convicted of crimes are required to surrender their firearms to law enforcement officials.  But people with restraining orders against them – even in cases where there are serious threats of domestic violence – almost never have to give up their guns.  Ross Reynolds talks with Kirkland Democrat Roger Goodman about his proposal to change that.