domestic violence

Tulalip Tribe
5:07 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

For Abused Native American Women, New Law Provides A 'Ray Of Hope'

Deborah Parker, vice chair of the Tulalip Tribes of Washington state, reacts to President Barack Obama signing the Violence Against Women Act in 2013 in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

This Thursday, three Native American tribes are changing how they administer justice.

For almost four decades, a U.S. Supreme Court ruling has barred tribes from prosecuting non-American Indian defendants. But as part of last year's re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act, a new program now allows tribes to try some non-Indian defendants in domestic abuse cases.

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Tribal Law
2:46 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Pilot Program Helps Domestic Violence Victims On Tulalip Reservation

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Tulalip Tribe Chairman Mel Sheldon about a federal pilot program that will allow the Tulalip Tribe to prosecute non-tribal members who are accused of domestic violence on the reservation.

Elections 2013
8:48 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Ed Murray Supporters Launch TV Ad Wars In Seattle Mayor's Race

Mayor McGinn and women's advocates spoke out on Thursday against the "deceptive" TV ads.
Credit KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The TV ad wars have begun in the Seattle mayor’s race.

This week, supporters of state Senator Ed Murray are running an ad that has some women’s advocates up in arms.

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Violent Crime
6:34 pm
Mon April 22, 2013

Police: Domestic Violence Started Mass Shooting In Federal Way

Federal Way Chief of Police Brian J. Wilson speaks to reporters at a news conference on Monday, Apr. 22, 2013.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Police say a quadruple murder in Federal Way Sunday night started as a domestic violence incident.

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Gun Control
11:59 am
Wed March 20, 2013

Restraining Orders And Guns: What Does One Have To Do With The Other?

Who should surrender firearms in Washington state?
Flickr Photo/Sari Dennise

In Washington state people convicted of crimes are required to surrender their firearms to law enforcement officials.  But people with restraining orders against them – even in cases where there are serious threats of domestic violence – almost never have to give up their guns.  Ross Reynolds talks with Kirkland Democrat Roger Goodman about his proposal to change that.