discrimination | KUOW News and Information

discrimination

Journalist David Neiwert
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

In the late 1970’s, David Neiwert was just getting his journalism career started. He worked at a small daily newspaper in Sand Point, Idaho, about 20 miles outside the Aryan Nations compound.

He had to figure out how the paper was going to cover the hate group.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson
Wikipedia Photo/Joe Mabel (http://bit.ly/2k4mxi4)

Guy Nelson talks with Seattle Times reporter Nina Shapiro about the discrimination allegations against Mukilteo aerospace company Electroimpact. The company is accused of discriminating against Muslims and single people. The company, which denies any wrongdoing entered into a consent decree with the state Attorney General's office.

A few years ago, Nikita Smith was named in an eviction case by her landlord.

They ended up resolving the issue and she was never evicted.

But being named in the case was enough to disqualify her when she applied for a home in Renton in 2015.

Now, Smith has filed a lawsuit targeting the landlord screening policy that stood in her way.


Jasmin Samy is th civil rights manager at CAIR-Washington State, a chapter of America's largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization. She says it's often difficult to get people to speak up when they think they're being discriminated against.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

When people of color try to rent housing in Seattle, they’re treated differently from white people.

At the U.S. Supreme Court, you know that it's going to be a hot argument when the usually straight-faced Justice Samuel Alito begins a question this way: "Let's say four people show up for a job interview ... this is going to sound like a joke, but it's not."

The issue before the court on Wednesday was whether retailer Abercrombie & Fitch violated the federal law banning religious discrimination when it rejected a highly rated job applicant because she wore a Muslim headscarf.

A closely watched court case dealing with whether religious business-owners must provide services to gay couples is headed to oral arguments Friday in Kennewick, Washington.

Human Rights Watch is calling on the Russian government to condemn what is calls a surge in attacks against LGBT people in Russia.

The group says the dramatic rise in attacks followed a law approved by the Russian government in 2013, which Human Rights Watch says effectively legalized discrimination against Russia’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in Russia.

What happens in a small, semi-rural community in a southern state when an "out" transgender student decides to speak up for his civil rights?

Here in Gloucester County, Virginia, where I live — not far from the Historic Triangle of Yorktown-Williamsburg-Jamestown — the answer is that all hell breaks loose.

Women's reproductive rights are once again before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday. Only this time, pregnancy discrimination is the issue and pro-life and pro-choice groups are on the same side, opposed by business groups.

In the Gwanak-gu neighborhood of Seoul, there is a box.

Attached to the side of a building, the box resembles a book drop at a public library, only larger, and when nights are cold, the interior is heated. The Korean lettering on its front represents a phoneticized rendering of the English words "baby box." It was installed by Pastor Lee Jon-rak to accept abandoned infants. When its door opens, an alarm sounds, alerting staff to the presence of a new orphan.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Munincipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with James Gregory, director of the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project at the University of Washington, about the history of racial exclusion in early 20th century housing covenants.

This segment originally aired May 21, 2014.

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Religious institutions in Washington have previously been exempt from discrimination rules but that could be changing. The Washington Supreme Court said in decisions Thursday that some employees whose duties are non-religious can bring discrimination claims against these nonprofits.

Are Washingtonians forced by state government to act against their religious beliefs?

Last year, a Richland florist refused to provide flowers for a gay customer’s wedding. As a result, that florist is currently being sued by the state of Washington. When some Washington pharmacists felt they shouldn’t have to provide the morning-after pill to customers, the state pharmacy board jumped in. 

Now, Spokane Valley state Senator Mike Padden is drawing up a bill that would limit the state from compelling citizens to act against their religious beliefs. The senator talked with Ross Reynolds.

The State Supreme Court today heard arguments in a case that could decide whether faith-based employers in Washington have some exemption from the state’s anti-discrimination law.

How Common Is Weight Discrimination In Washington State?

May 2, 2013
Flickr/Alex E. Proimos

A new study from Johns Hopkins University finds that overweight patients are treated with less warmth than thinner patients by doctors. That kind of discrimination is not limited to the doctor’s office. Many overweight people say they face discrimination, mistreatment and bias in their daily lives.