diplomacy

Gary Locke may have won over ordinary Chinese with his conduct in the country, but not everyone was impressed with the first Chinese-American to serve as the U.S. envoy to China.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Steve Scher talks with political scientist Henry Farrell about the national security concerns that swirl around leakers like Edward Snowden and how publicizing national secrets affects American foreign policy.

Flickr Photo/Secretary of Defense

Steve Scher discusses the changing relationship between Saudi Arabia and the United States with Frederic Wehrey, senior associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Flickr Photo/President of the European Council

Reports that the United States has been spying on our European allies has caused outrage in the region. According to documents leaked to The Guardian by former National Security Agency employee Edward Snowden, the NSA has monitored the phone conversations of up to 35 world leaders.

The European Union held a council meeting yesterday and today in Brussels. The original purpose of the meeting was to discuss the economy and job growth, but that was quickly overshadowed by talk of security and trust. Allies spying on allies is nothing new, so why the anger about the revelations? Charles Kupchan, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, explains why this time is different and what the diplomatic fallout will be for the United States.