diplomacy | KUOW News and Information

diplomacy

Courtesy of Timothy Greenfield Sanders/Harper Collins

The work of diplomacy is subtle, but the actions of world leaders are sometimes the opposite. Famed American diplomat Madeleine Albright confronts the dangers of undiplomatic and undemocratic political trends in her new book “Fascism: A Warning.”

Shielded by an identity-protecting tarp, a Seattle locksmith drills the locks on a Russian-owned consular building.
RT Twitter feed

Yesterday afternoon in Madison Park, you may have seen an unusual breaking and entering. U.S. State Department officials drilled through the locks on the gate of a Russian-owned home, while former consular employees filmed across the street.

Photo Courtesy of FBI Records

In the early 2000s ten Russian nationals were living normal lives in the United States. They went to school, got jobs, and tried to infiltrate the inner circles of U.S. policymakers and businesses to send information back to Russia.

The Russian Consulate in Seattle was shuttered on Monday.
KUOW photo/John Ryan

Except for the rock-star parking space reserved for consul-licensed vehicles, you’d never know the Russian consulate in Seattle is inside the One Union Square building, on the 25th floor.

Bill Radke talks to Don Hellmann, professor emeritus at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies about the U.S. State Department's decision to close the Russian consulate in Seattle and expel 60 Russian diplomats in response to an attack on an ex-spy for Russia in England. 

A North Korean soldier looks at the southern side through a pair of binoculars at the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2003.
AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Bill Radke talks to Elizabeth Saunders, an associate professor of political science at George Washington University, about the exchanges between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, diplomacy and the threat of nuclear war

Gary Locke may have won over ordinary Chinese with his conduct in the country, but not everyone was impressed with the first Chinese-American to serve as the U.S. envoy to China.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Steve Scher talks with political scientist Henry Farrell about the national security concerns that swirl around leakers like Edward Snowden and how publicizing national secrets affects American foreign policy.

Flickr Photo/Secretary of Defense

Steve Scher discusses the changing relationship between Saudi Arabia and the United States with Frederic Wehrey, senior associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Flickr Photo/President of the European Council

Reports that the United States has been spying on our European allies has caused outrage in the region. According to documents leaked to The Guardian by former National Security Agency employee Edward Snowden, the NSA has monitored the phone conversations of up to 35 world leaders.

The European Union held a council meeting yesterday and today in Brussels. The original purpose of the meeting was to discuss the economy and job growth, but that was quickly overshadowed by talk of security and trust. Allies spying on allies is nothing new, so why the anger about the revelations? Charles Kupchan, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, explains why this time is different and what the diplomatic fallout will be for the United States.