development

The Duwamish River isn't naturally straight - we did that while building the city of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/King County, WA (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bL547t

Bill Radke sits down with Crosscut's Knute Berger to discuss Seattle's many massive engineering projects that it has undertaken over the years. Berger wonders what the city would have been like if we hadn't straightened the Duwamish River or gotten rid of Denny Hill: Would we have been a city at all? 

Gayle Nowicki of Gargoyles Statuary says growth is coming, so why fight it? She just hopes there will be a place in the future U-District for small, funky businesses like hers
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's plan to allow taller buildings in areas of the University District. 

When a man-made disaster of unfathomable scope strikes your city and its central symbol of prosperity has been leveled to ruin — and it's your job to jolt it into resurgence — where do you begin?

Only hours had passed after the planes struck New York City's twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001, when then-Mayor Rudy Giuliani made a promise to rebuild: "We're not only going to rebuild, we're going to come out of this stronger than we were before."

Moe Toure runs Toure Apparel in a strip mall on one of Vulcan Real Estate's 23rd Avenue properties.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

For years, the Central District didn’t get much investment. But recently, the city poured money into infrastructure improvements on 23rd Avenue. Then Vulcan bought a city block of real estate along the route. 

The real estate giant is planning 40,000 square feet of retail space and 570 apartments. They’re also planning a second development across the street.


Jennifer Weitman, left, and Carrie Anderson, right, outside one of their teenage haunts at Totem Lake Mall: Denny's Pet World, now closed. The mall is being readied for redevelopment.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Malls are facing trouble everywhere. But Totem Lake Mall in Kirkland is in a category of its own.  It’s a zombie: an undead mall with just a few remaining businesses. People have been trying to revitalize it for years.

And finally, there’s action. The mall has been bought by a California developer who is reenvisioning it as a place where people can shop, work, play and live. It's a big change from the mall's former identity as a hangout for young people.


A pavement park at the corner of University and Boylston offers a colorful area, but not green space.
Flickr Photo/SDOT Photos (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/F7VBT2

Bill Radke speaks with Adiel Kaplan about her article for Investigate West about green space in the city and the future of public parks in Seattle. 

Activists and anarchists lived at 1643 King Street for at least 40 years. They called it the King Street Collective.
Courtesy of Ronni Tartlet

If this house could talk, what stories would it tell?

About the Irish-American couple that first owned it?

And the Japanese family sent to an internment camp?

Or the anarchists that played drums during the WTO protests?


'Week in Review' panel Paul Guppy, Bill Radke, Erica C. Barnett and Mike McGinn.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Duvall, Carnation, North Bend, Snoqualmie and Covington all want to grow. The Puget Sound Regional Council, which oversees the growth and development of the region, says not too big and not too fast. Who gets to decide how rapidly a city grows?

Demand is soaring for Seattle-area homes. Buyers who want to succeed are bidding up prices. This Seattle house recently sold for $100,000 over the asking price.
Seattle MLS

House prices in Washington state are rising faster than in any other state in the country.

Rents are also rising, and it’s all because Seattle companies are hiring. It’s an unusual predicament for people looking for a foothold in this real estate market.

At the South Lake Union Discovery Center, a Vulcan guide apologized that the model was so out of date. It hadn't been updated in a couple years.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle took in over 50,000 new people in the last five years. Suzanne Offen is one of them.

Before moving here, she had family and a comfortable job in Brooklyn, New York.


An aerial view of the proposed addition of the Washington State Convention Center.
Courtesy of Washington State Convention Center

Here in Seattle we like to debate almost everything: a monorail, the downtown tunnel, more light rail.

But some big-ticket decisions are hardly debated at all, like a proposed $1.4 billion plan to build an addition to the Washington State Convention Center.

Seattle Municipal Archives

Emily Fox talks with Crosscut's Knute Berger about the rental crisis that affected Seattle in the early 1960's. In anticipation of visitors for the Seattle World's Fair, some Seattle landlords evicted tenants, jacked up rents, and turned their apartments into short-term rentals.


Under a new city plan, apartment buildings could be as high as the UW Tower (tallest building pictured). They are currently capped at 65 feet.
Flickr Photo/Atomic Taco (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8cYwTm

More high-rises could sprout up in the University District under new zoning recommendations from the city.

It's one piece of the city's plan for more housing to keep up with the booming population. The city held a public meeting about it Tuesday night at the Neptune Theater and will accept public comments until June 30.


Jim Loter documented building a backyard cottage in Seattle. Here's a picture from day 25: erecting the walls.
Flickr Photo/Jim L (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/s/aHsju5PWuH

You won't find many backyard cottages or mother-in-law units in Seattle. City officials say about 220 have been built since city officials started allowing them in 2009.

City Councilmember Mike O'Brien wants to change that to meet the growing demand for housing.

'Week in Review' panel Erica C. Barnett, Ross Reynolds, Gyasi Ross and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ever heard of Seattle's 20-year plan? We discuss why you should care about it.  And what kind of hope should we have for the new approach to the homeless encampment known as the Jungle? Also, as Sound Transit move towards a light-rail future, are they spending too much on the opening day festivities? What does it mean for Washington state now that the Army Corps of Engineers has put a stop to a new deep water terminal in Cherry Point? 

Ross Reynolds talks over the week's news with writer Erica C. Barnett, columnist Jonathan Martin and lawyer and activist Gyasi Ross.  

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