Democrats

Frank Chopp, Washington Speaker of the House, in 2006.
Flickr Photo/The Children's Alliance (CC-BY-NC-ND)

State Speaker of the House Frank Chopp’s path to politics began in Bremerton, Wash., in a surplus housing unit from the Navy Yard. He started as an activist and hasn’t abandoned that point of view.

“I consider myself still to be a community organizer, I just happen to be Speaker of the House,” he said.

Meager beginnings made him passionate about affordable housing, and helping his sister cope with bipolar disorder turned his attention to mental health care.

California billionaire and climate activist Tom Steyer has contributed a significant amount of cash to an environmental political action committee in Washington.

From Ramtha's School of Enlightenment's Facebook page.

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle Weekly writer Rick Anderson about JZ Knight, a woman from the town of Yelm who claims to be channeling an ancient warrior spirit named Ramtha. Knight is seeking a restraining order against the Evergreen Freedom Foundation in Olympia for circulating a video where Knight is shown making racial slurs.

Midterm Elections: Will Democrats Take Control Of The State Senate?

May 27, 2014

Steve Scher talks to writer and political consultant Chris Vance about key races that might tip the scale in favor of Senate Democrats.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

When Brady Walkinshaw was a young child growing up in rural Whatcom County, his parents noticed he had a particular affinity for politics.

By the age of 4 or 5, “I have vivid memories of him organizing books on the floor [about] states and trying to figure out where the capitals were,” his father Charlie said.

Courtesy of Washington State University

Tom Foley, a Spokane Democrat who rose to become speaker of the House in 1989, died Friday morning at his current home in Washington, DC. He was 84. 

His wife Heather Foley  told the Associated Press her husband died of complications from strokes. Foley had been in hospice care in the nation's capital for the past six months.

Foley left Congress in 1994, when Republicans took control of the U.S. House of Representatives for the first time in 40 years. Foley was the first House speaker to be defeated in his home district since the Civil War.

Democrat Concedes Secretary Of State Contest

Nov 13, 2012
Courtesy Citizens for Kim Wyman - GOP

Democrat Kathleen Drew has conceded the race for Washington secretary of state.

In a statement Saturday, Drew said of her Republican rival Kim Wyman, "I know that she will carry forward Washington’s tradition of fair and impartial elections, and I am optimistic that she will work on measures to remove barriers and increase voter participation."

Suzan DelBene
Amy Radil

At a post-election lunch for politicians and labor leaders, Democrats were savoring their victories, but also contemplating the tough choices awaiting progressives in Congress this month.

Senator Maria Cantwell waving at a campaign rally.
KUOW/Deborah Wang

As the vote count continues, Washington Republicans are preparing for possible losses in several key state races.

Democratic attorney general hopeful Bob Ferguson leads Republican Reagan Dunn. The two are vying for the seat left open by Republican Rob McKenna, who stepped down to run for governor. McKenna has held the office since 2005.

KUOW/Deborah Wang

Democratic Party activists in the state of Washington were in high gear this weekend conducting a massive get-out-the-vote campaign. Hundreds of volunteers manned phone banks and fanned out across neighborhoods to encourage people who hadn’t voted to turn in their ballots.

New Political Lines Being Drawn On Eastside

Oct 25, 2012
King County voting districts on the I-405 corridor.
King County/iMap

The voters in the cities and towns on the east side of Lake Washington are a diverse bunch. Gone is the red swath that once ran up the I-405 corridor. Changing economics and demographics have created patches of blue and a purple hue where the outcomes of statewide elections are determined. We talk with Knute Berger about how Democrats and Independents are reshaping Eastside politics and where Republicans are digging in.