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Democratic Party

Boos from Bernie Sanders supporters drowned out U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, the convention chair, when she mentioned Hillary Clinton on Monday.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

If you want to have the Hillary Clinton-Bernie Sanders divide explained in two sound bites, you could do worse than Jack Smith and Pamela Eakes.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


Thank you so much. You know, it's hard to believe that it has been eight years since I first came to this convention to talk with you about why I thought my husband should be President. Remember how I told you about his character and conviction, his decency and his grace — the traits that we've seen every day that he's served our country in the White House.

Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens at a pre-convention event on July 24.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke talks with Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens about leaked DNC emails that many Bernie Sanders supporters say prove the party's primary contest was stacked against him.

A Bernie Sanders supporter demonstrates outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Monday, July 25.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

The Democratic National Convention kicked off Monday in Philadelphia with temperatures in the mid-90s (approximately 20 degrees higher than the point Seattleites start complaining about the heat).

Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, traveled to Philadelphia to protest outside the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about growing protests outside the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. Radke also speaks with protester Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, Washington. 

Why would Russian President Vladimir Putin want to help Donald Trump win the White House?

That's the accusation from Democrats this week, after embarrassing internal Democratic National Committee emails appeared on Wikileaks on the eve of the party's convention in Philadelphia.

The emails were lifted earlier this year in a hacking breach that security experts have linked to Russian espionage groups.

Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

The Democrats on Friday released an outline of their upcoming convention, and one of the main goals appears to be showing off the party's unity after a long primary fight.

After a divisive primary season between presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, the convention schedule includes a speech from Sanders on the first night, Monday, July 25. That night's theme is "United Together" — indeed, of the four nights' themes, three include the word "together."

Sen. Bernie Sanders went out of his way Sunday to find praise for the Democratic party's platform drafting committee, but there is one major sticking point: The Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Sanders wants the final platform to unequivocally oppose the free-trade deal that was negotiated by the Obama administration, saying it "threatens our democracy" in an op-ed published in The Philadelphia Inquirer on Sunday.

Suzan DelBene talking to supporters at the Woodmark Hotel in Kirkland.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Kim Malcolm speaks with Rep. Suzan DelBene (D-Wash.) about why she took part in a sit-in on the House floor with other Democrats to demand a vote on a measure that would restrict the purchase of a firearm by a person on the terrorist watch list. All of Washington's Democratic Congress members were part of the protest.

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Reuters

Representative Sander Levin of Michigan called it a "Selma-like moment."

Representative Joe Kennedy of Massachusetts, reading a letter from the wife of a slain Boston doctor, said that after Orlando, she has cried every day.

An extraordinary sit-in on the House floor began on Wednesday morning, with Democrat after Democrat demanding that the House vote on a gun-control bill before going on recess.

A large crowd fills a hall on Bainbridge Island for the Democratic caucuses on Saturday, March 26.
KUOW Photo/Bill Buzenberg

Washington Democrats complained about problems with the presidential caucuses this year and the state party listened. The party has long used precinct caucuses to pick delegates and choose which candidate they will support.

Washington Democrats are gathering this weekend in Tacoma for their state convention. Just like with the state Republican convention in Pasco last month, Democrats are a party divided. Hillary Clinton is the presumptive nominee. But Bernie Sanders supporters represent the majority of delegates.

The Senate is set to vote on four gun control measures Monday evening — and none of them is expected to pass.

Getting these votes scheduled was the singular goal of a 15-hour talking marathon Senate Democrats mounted on the Senate floor Wednesday. But because the outcome of the votes is already a foregone conclusion, some senators are wondering out loud: "What's the point?"

"This is unfortunately about politics on Monday night, not about finding a solution that will work for our country," said Republican Bob Corker of Tennessee.

Washington state Democrats are confident they will avoid a Nevada-like meltdown at their state convention this weekend. Nevada’s Democratic convention devolved into chaos after Bernie Sanders supporters felt the process was rigged.

U.S. Senator Patty Murray
Flickr Photo/Senate Democrats (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with U.S. Senator Patty Murray about her role in a filibuster that lasted nearly 15 hours over Wednesday and early Thursday. U.S. Senate Democrats took over their chamber on Wednesday in an attempt to force action on gun control.

The Democratic Party about to nominate a historic candidate. That candidate's opponent not ready to accept that reality.

Bernie Sanders?

No, Hillary Clinton in 2008.

Hillary Clinton won today's Democratic primary in Puerto Rico, according to the Associated Press.

With about a quarter of precincts reporting, Clinton had about two-thirds of the vote. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders had about one-third.

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Oregon U.S. Senator Jeff Merkeley made headlines this week by becoming the first member of the Senate to officially endorse Bernie Sanders for president. It's a coveted prize for supporters of the candidate, who are hoping more public officials decide to "feel the Bern."

Washington Senator Patty Murray won't be one of them.

Gov. Jay Inslee (center) joins caucus-goers in Bainbridge Island.
KUOW Photo/Bill Buzenberg

Bernie Sanders had a big win in the Washington state caucuses with more than 70 percent of the vote.

But not everyone is feeling the Bern. In fact, most of Washington state's superdelegates are still backing Hillary Clinton.

Precinct volunteers count caucus votes at Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School in Seattle on Saturday, March 26. Democrats turned out across the state to support Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton by a wide margin Saturday in Washington state's Democratic caucuses, according to party results.

Niah, April and Jasmyne Sims pose outside Safeco Field before the Bernie Sanders rally Friday in Seattle.
KUOW photo/John O'Brien

Bernie Sanders hit familiar themes in his ballpark appearance in Seattle Friday.

The presidential candidate spoke to thousands of people at his second Seattle appearance in less than a week. People lined up outside Safeco Field hours ahead of the rally.

State Democratic Party Chair Jaxon Ravens predicts strong caucus turnout, but shy of the record set in 2008.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Washington Democrats are predicting strong turnout at the party caucuses this Saturday. They chalk it up to innovations in getting voters involved and the whirlwind of visits from presidential candidates. 

Actress Susan Sarandon, left, and Jane Sanders, wife of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), at a dinner in Las Vegas, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2016.
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Bill Radke speaks with Jane Sanders about why her spouse Bernie Sanders is the right presidential candidate for Washington state voters. 

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke to 15,000 supporters in and outside Key Arena, March 20, 2016.
KUOW Photo/John O'Brien

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders scorched a path across Washington state yesterday in his bid to win the Democratic presidential nomination.

And while his stop in Seattle may not have reached Legion of Boom levels, things got plenty loud in Key Arena.

Audio Pending...

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland walks with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden from the Oval Office to the Rose Garden to be introduced as Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court at the White House, Wed., March 16, 2016.
AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Audio Pending...

The big news of the day is President Obama's nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court. Bill Radke talks about the nomination with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal, Washington U.S. Senate candidate Chris Vance and current Washington U.S. Senator Patty Murray.

Sen. Bernie Sanders has won the Democratic caucuses in Maine, a victory that means he'll be taking home most of the state's 25 delegates at stake.

With nearly all of the state's precincts reporting, Sanders leads rival Hillary Clinton by double digits, with more than 64 percent of the vote.

 Jaxon Ravens, chairman of the Washington State Democratic Party
Flickr Photo/Ronald Woan (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1JCLnwP

Bill Radke speaks with Jaxon Ravens, chairman of the Washington State Democratic Party, about voters' feelings on the economy as we head into the 2016 election year. He said that middle class incomes have struggled to keep pace, but as a whole the state has been doing very well. 

Bernie Sanders, senator from Vermont and presidential candidate, and Councilmember Kshama Sawant at a rally held at Westlake Center this fall.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

Bill Radke talks to John Nichols, political reporter for The Nation, about presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' speech defining Democratic Socialism and what it means for socialist candidates, including Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant.

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