Democratic Party | KUOW News and Information

Democratic Party

Amy Radil

UPDATE: 5:49 pm. Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson tells KUOW that she has reached an agreement with the state Democratic Party because of the threat of the lawsuit.

Anderson says her office will acquiesce to the party's demands and is currently in the process of working out the details. Anderson contends the original mailings did not cause confusion among voters but says she reached the agreement to avoid the possible legal action.

'Mail by November 4 (Stamp required)'

Pramila Jayapal and Brady Walkinshaw agree on the issues for the most part. Walkinshaw notes that his contributions come mostly from within Washington state; Jayapal rebuts that she is running for national office.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Campaigning before The Breakfast Group, a civic organization for African-American men, Brady Piñero Walkinshaw admitted that they had a choice between “two great progressives.”

He was referring to himself – a state representative from Capitol Hill – and Pramila Jayapal, state senator from Columbia City.

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg waves after speaking to delegates during the third day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Wednesday, July 27, 2016.
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

New York billionaire Michael Bloomberg has waded a quarter-million dollars deeper into Washington state politics.

Bloomberg gave $248,000 to Washington Democrats on Sept. 7, according to the latest reports filed with the Washington Public Disclosure Commission.

Republicans and Democrats have moved further and further from each other over the last few decades. The result has been gridlock and partisan vitriol like many Americans have never seen in their lifetimes.

As it turns out, it's not just about beliefs: according to a new report from the Pew Research Center, "the two parties look less alike today than at any point over the last quarter-century."

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is crafting a new storyline about who may have provided the material he published that caused an implosion in the Democratic National Committee's leadership this summer.

Bill Radke talks with former sportscaster Tony Ventrella, Democratic candidate for Congress in Washington's 8th Congressional District. Ventrella made it through Tuesday's top-two primary election despite abandoning his campaign at the beginning of July.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

Kim Malcolm talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the initial primary results for Washington's statewide and legislative races.

JZ Knight claims to channel a 35,000-year-old warrior-spirit named Ramtha.
Ramtha's School of Enlightenment

Donald Trump has been widely criticized for making offensive statements about Mexicans, but he is not the only politically active figure who has made such statements.


Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine clarified Sunday that his position on abortion rights is unmoved, despite top Clinton campaign aides' recent assertions otherwise.

"My voting position on abortion hasn't really changed," Kaine told CNN. "I support the Hyde Amendment. I haven't changed that."

The Democratic National Convention is over. Here are some of the big takeaways from a week in Philadelphia that had more suspense and drama than expected.

The Democrats Are Really, Really Good At This

Just like Barack Obama's two conventions, this one was flawlessly choreographed. Even the revolt of the Bernie Bros had a more-or-less happy ending.

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

Bill Radke talks to University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about unity at the Democratic and Republican National Conventions and how the elections of the past compare to the 2016 conventions. 

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

David Hyde talks with Sen. Patty Murray about Hillary Clinton's historic nomination for president. Murray speaks Thursday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

WA delegate on Hillary Clinton's historic night

Jul 27, 2016
Washington Democratic delegate Jamian Smith.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Bill Radke talks with Washington state delegate Jamian Smith and KUOW's David Hyde from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Bernie Sanders addresses the Washington state delegates at breakfast Wednesday morning.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night as the first woman to receive the presidential nomination from a major political party. Not everyone was jovial about it, though. 

Some of Washington's delegates who support Bernie Sanders left the convention hall to stage a protest in the media area.

There was no script for the protest Tuesday night by Bernie supporters, who walked out after Hillary Clinton's formal nomination and jammed the media center.
KUOW PHOTO/KATE WALTERS

If you compare the tone of the Republican convention with Bill Clinton's speech on Tuesday night and Michelle Obama's two nights ago, you could argue that the Democrats are more positive.

But that’s what you see on stage. These are giant theatrical productions.

Washington delegate Pamela Eakes at the convention in Philadelphia: 'Young girls right now can look up and they're going to see a president who is a mother, a woman.'
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night when she became the first woman nominated for president by a major party.

The moment drew mixed emotions from Washington state delegates. Many were ecstatic. Hillary delegate Pam Eakes danced on the floor and yelled, "This is it."

The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

Delegates and protesters share a ride to the Democratic Convention Tuesday. Protesters were asked to disembark a stop before the convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Democrats woke up Tuesday morning still aglow from Michelle Obama's epic address at the convention Monday evening.

It was a useful distraction from the ongoing tension with staunch Bernie Sanders supporters. Some have come around to Hillary Clinton, but protesters continued demonstrating in Philadelphia.

Boos from Bernie Sanders supporters drowned out U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, the convention chair, when she mentioned Hillary Clinton on Monday.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

If you want to have the Hillary Clinton-Bernie Sanders divide explained in two sound bites, you could do worse than Jack Smith and Pamela Eakes.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


Thank you so much. You know, it's hard to believe that it has been eight years since I first came to this convention to talk with you about why I thought my husband should be President. Remember how I told you about his character and conviction, his decency and his grace — the traits that we've seen every day that he's served our country in the White House.

Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens at a pre-convention event on July 24.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke talks with Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens about leaked DNC emails that many Bernie Sanders supporters say prove the party's primary contest was stacked against him.

A Bernie Sanders supporter demonstrates outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Monday, July 25.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

The Democratic National Convention kicked off Monday in Philadelphia with temperatures in the mid-90s (approximately 20 degrees higher than the point Seattleites start complaining about the heat).

Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, traveled to Philadelphia to protest outside the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about growing protests outside the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. Radke also speaks with protester Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, Washington. 

Why would Russian President Vladimir Putin want to help Donald Trump win the White House?

That's the accusation from Democrats this week, after embarrassing internal Democratic National Committee emails appeared on Wikileaks on the eve of the party's convention in Philadelphia.

The emails were lifted earlier this year in a hacking breach that security experts have linked to Russian espionage groups.

Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

The Democrats on Friday released an outline of their upcoming convention, and one of the main goals appears to be showing off the party's unity after a long primary fight.

After a divisive primary season between presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, the convention schedule includes a speech from Sanders on the first night, Monday, July 25. That night's theme is "United Together" — indeed, of the four nights' themes, three include the word "together."

Sen. Bernie Sanders went out of his way Sunday to find praise for the Democratic party's platform drafting committee, but there is one major sticking point: The Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Sanders wants the final platform to unequivocally oppose the free-trade deal that was negotiated by the Obama administration, saying it "threatens our democracy" in an op-ed published in The Philadelphia Inquirer on Sunday.

Suzan DelBene talking to supporters at the Woodmark Hotel in Kirkland.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Kim Malcolm speaks with Rep. Suzan DelBene (D-Wash.) about why she took part in a sit-in on the House floor with other Democrats to demand a vote on a measure that would restrict the purchase of a firearm by a person on the terrorist watch list. All of Washington's Democratic Congress members were part of the protest.

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