Democratic Party

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg waves after speaking to delegates during the third day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Wednesday, July 27, 2016.
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

New York billionaire Michael Bloomberg has waded a quarter-million dollars deeper into Washington state politics.

Bloomberg gave $248,000 to Washington Democrats on Sept. 7, according to the latest reports filed with the Washington Public Disclosure Commission.

Republicans and Democrats have moved further and further from each other over the last few decades. The result has been gridlock and partisan vitriol like many Americans have never seen in their lifetimes.

As it turns out, it's not just about beliefs: according to a new report from the Pew Research Center, "the two parties look less alike today than at any point over the last quarter-century."

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is crafting a new storyline about who may have provided the material he published that caused an implosion in the Democratic National Committee's leadership this summer.

Bill Radke talks with former sportscaster Tony Ventrella, Democratic candidate for Congress in Washington's 8th Congressional District. Ventrella made it through Tuesday's top-two primary election despite abandoning his campaign at the beginning of July.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the initial primary results for Washington's statewide and legislative races.

JZ Knight claims to channel a 35,000-year-old warrior-spirit named Ramtha.
Ramtha's School of Enlightenment

Donald Trump has been widely criticized for making offensive statements about Mexicans, but he is not the only politically active figure who has made such statements.


Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine clarified Sunday that his position on abortion rights is unmoved, despite top Clinton campaign aides' recent assertions otherwise.

"My voting position on abortion hasn't really changed," Kaine told CNN. "I support the Hyde Amendment. I haven't changed that."

The Democratic National Convention is over. Here are some of the big takeaways from a week in Philadelphia that had more suspense and drama than expected.

The Democrats Are Really, Really Good At This

Just like Barack Obama's two conventions, this one was flawlessly choreographed. Even the revolt of the Bernie Bros had a more-or-less happy ending.

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

Bill Radke talks to University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about unity at the Democratic and Republican National Conventions and how the elections of the past compare to the 2016 conventions. 

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

David Hyde talks with Sen. Patty Murray about Hillary Clinton's historic nomination for president. Murray speaks Thursday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

WA delegate on Hillary Clinton's historic night

Jul 27, 2016
Washington Democratic delegate Jamian Smith.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Bill Radke talks with Washington state delegate Jamian Smith and KUOW's David Hyde from the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Bernie Sanders addresses the Washington state delegates at breakfast Wednesday morning.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night as the first woman to receive the presidential nomination from a major political party. Not everyone was jovial about it, though. 

Some of Washington's delegates who support Bernie Sanders left the convention hall to stage a protest in the media area.

There was no script for the protest Tuesday night by Bernie supporters, who walked out after Hillary Clinton's formal nomination and jammed the media center.
KUOW PHOTO/KATE WALTERS

If you compare the tone of the Republican convention with Bill Clinton's speech on Tuesday night and Michelle Obama's two nights ago, you could argue that the Democrats are more positive.

But that’s what you see on stage. These are giant theatrical productions.

Washington delegate Pamela Eakes at the convention in Philadelphia: 'Young girls right now can look up and they're going to see a president who is a mother, a woman.'
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night when she became the first woman nominated for president by a major party.

The moment drew mixed emotions from Washington state delegates. Many were ecstatic. Hillary delegate Pam Eakes danced on the floor and yelled, "This is it."

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