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Democratic Party

State Democratic Party Chair Jaxon Ravens predicts strong caucus turnout, but shy of the record set in 2008.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Deborah Wang speaks with Washington state Democratic Party chairman Jaxon Ravens about the future of the party. She also speaks with Jessa Lewis, Alec Stephens and Tamborine Borrelli. 

This election map is a lie. So we made new ones

Nov 18, 2016
Washington state presidential election results, 2016
KUOW graphic/Abe Epton

Maps lie because they simplify. They  lie in different ways, to show certain realities, and electoral maps are no different.

In places where there are few people, hundreds of square miles turn red or blue (but usually red) because those voters cast their ballots in a certain way.

A lot has changed since election night when it looked like House Democrats were poised to gain two seats and cement their majority. Now fortunes could be changing in favor of Republicans and the Washington state House could be headed for a tie.

With the defeat of Hillary Clinton and the election of Donald Trump, Democrats may feel they have hit bottom.

The new power structure in Washington will combine a Republican president and a Republican Congress for the first time since 2006. Throw in pending and prospective vacancies on the Supreme Court, and you can see why many progressives consider this the worst-case scenario.

But it is not.

In Bernie Sanders' new book, Our Revolution, the Vermont senator tells the story of his life, his career and his run for the Democratic presidential nomination.

He also spells out the programs he believes the country should adopt to combat such ills as inequality, discrimination and lack of opportunity, not to mention the burdens of college and health care costs.

Sanders says he was not shocked by Donald Trump's victory. But he says the election results show it is time for the Democratic Party to undergo a fundamental reassessment.

Tracey Tran of Seattle is worried (her words) that Donald Trump will be the next President of the United States. She was with friends at The Comet.
KUOW Photo/Meryl Schenker

KUOW reporters were around the Puget Sound region Tuesday night covering the election. They spoke to some very somber Hilary Clinton supporters to get their reactions to Donald Trump's victory.

Voices include Loren Hendrickson, Blake Lynch, Kim Morris, Monica Lyon-Mendez and Antoinette Smith-Alexander.

Amy Radil

UPDATE: 5:49 pm. Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson tells KUOW that she has reached an agreement with the state Democratic Party because of the threat of the lawsuit.

Anderson says her office will acquiesce to the party's demands and is currently in the process of working out the details. Anderson contends the original mailings did not cause confusion among voters but says she reached the agreement to avoid the possible legal action.

'Mail by November 4 (Stamp required)'

Pramila Jayapal and Brady Walkinshaw agree on the issues for the most part. Walkinshaw notes that his contributions come mostly from within Washington state; Jayapal rebuts that she is running for national office.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Campaigning before The Breakfast Group, a civic organization for African-American men, Brady Piñero Walkinshaw admitted that they had a choice between “two great progressives.”

He was referring to himself – a state representative from Capitol Hill – and Pramila Jayapal, state senator from Columbia City.

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg waves after speaking to delegates during the third day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Wednesday, July 27, 2016.
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

New York billionaire Michael Bloomberg has waded a quarter-million dollars deeper into Washington state politics.

Bloomberg gave $248,000 to Washington Democrats on Sept. 7, according to the latest reports filed with the Washington Public Disclosure Commission.

Republicans and Democrats have moved further and further from each other over the last few decades. The result has been gridlock and partisan vitriol like many Americans have never seen in their lifetimes.

As it turns out, it's not just about beliefs: according to a new report from the Pew Research Center, "the two parties look less alike today than at any point over the last quarter-century."

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is crafting a new storyline about who may have provided the material he published that caused an implosion in the Democratic National Committee's leadership this summer.

Bill Radke talks with former sportscaster Tony Ventrella, Democratic candidate for Congress in Washington's 8th Congressional District. Ventrella made it through Tuesday's top-two primary election despite abandoning his campaign at the beginning of July.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the initial primary results for Washington's statewide and legislative races.

JZ Knight claims to channel a 35,000-year-old warrior-spirit named Ramtha.
Ramtha's School of Enlightenment

Donald Trump has been widely criticized for making offensive statements about Mexicans, but he is not the only politically active figure who has made such statements.


Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine clarified Sunday that his position on abortion rights is unmoved, despite top Clinton campaign aides' recent assertions otherwise.

"My voting position on abortion hasn't really changed," Kaine told CNN. "I support the Hyde Amendment. I haven't changed that."

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