culture

"Enlighten us, but make it quick."

That's the premise of Ignite Seattle, a regular worldwide event where presenters get five minutes and 20 slides to get a point across. Speakers at this month's event touch on a variety of topics, including artistry, forgiveness and the environment. One woman even talks about a fear of public speaking.

Ignite Seattle took place at Town Hall on November 8, 2012. The talk was moderated by The Seattle Times columnist Monica Guzman.

On today's show, we bring you some of our favorite segments of the year. We talk about vulnerability, photography and The Boss.

Is There Power In Vulnerability?

Being vulnerable and open to failure makes us uncomfortable, but according to the research of Brene Brown, we can’t have success without vulnerability. Ross Reynolds discusses the power of vulnerability with University of Houston Professor Brene Brown.

Seattle-Based Artist Goes Small Then Large To Highlight The Big Picture

If there's one tradition that's never faded away in our history as people on this earth, it's storytelling. StoryCorps is a massive oral history project whose mission is to record, preserve and share the stories of Americans from all background and beliefs. It was founded in 2003 by radio documentary producer Dave Isay. People tell their stories in mobile booths all around the country, and selected stories air nationally on NPR. Isay spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on February 7, 2012.

Akward family dinner
Flickr photo/Patrick Gensel

Being related to someone doesn’t mean that you “relate” to them.  Do you talk to your crazy uncle about politics? What about religion?  Jeannie Yandel hears from listeners about their Thanksgiving blowouts. 

The Meaning Of Food

Nov 19, 2012
Corn
Flickr photo/ Sharon Drummond

The New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik takes food very seriously. But he thinks the Slow Food Movement is too pious. Gopnik discusses his experience with extreme locavorism, the history and meaning of restaurants, and other topics The Table Comes First: Family, France, And The Meaning Of Food.

Steven Bender is a law professor at Seattle University. He writes about the policies and issues involving Mexican–Americans. And, he’s also kind of obsessed with deconstructing popular culture messages about the lives and experiences of Latinos, because he’s seen a lot of negative stereotypes. Professor Bender talked with KUOW's Jamala Henderson about watching three films that present a more nuanced portrayal of Mexicans and the Mexican–American experience.

Cheech and Chong, "Born in East LA"

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