culture

Cultural Heritage
10:00 am
Thu March 28, 2013

A "Yokohama Yankee" Journeys Into His Family's Past

Leslie Helm's 'Yokohama Yankee.'

Leslie Helm was born and raised in Yokohama, Japan. Most of his family members are of European descent, and you would be hard pressed to look into his face and see his half-Japanese grandparents reflected back. When he adopted Japanese children, he started exploring his own roots. Leslie Helm takes us along on his journey as a "Yokohama Yankee" — a story that outlines the racial and economic tensions that defined US and Japanese relations for much of the 19th and 20th centuries.

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Philanthropy
10:00 am
Mon March 25, 2013

Virginia Wright: The Legacy Of An Art Philanthropist

The newest SAM installation, 'Mirror.' The installation was funded by Bagley and Virginia Wright.
Credit Courtesy/Doug Aitken Workshop

When you take stock of Seattle’s cultural institutions, you’ll often see the name Bagley Wright attached. More than 50 years ago, Wright helped transform the Seattle Art Museum from a small, family-run operation into what it is today. One of his final gifts to the museum he loved is “Mirror,” a permanent installation on SAM’s northwest facade that both the museum and the artist hope will spur urban conversation in downtown Seattle. Marcie Sillman talks with Virginia Wright about her husband’s legacy at Seattle Art Museum and throughout the city.

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Immigration Reform
11:38 am
Fri March 22, 2013

Undocumented Asian Immigrants In Washington State

Demonstrators walking under a giant American flag march through downtown Chicago, Monday, May 1, 2006, to show support for immigrant rights.
AP Photo/M. Spencer Green

There are approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants now in the US – around a quarter million here in Washington state. Unlike other parts of the country, the majority of immigrants in Washington are from Asian countries. Why aren’t Asian undocumented immigrants more visible in protests and in the press? Ross Reynolds talks with We Belong Together co-chair, Pramila Jayapal.

Gun Culture
1:44 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

What's Worked, And What Hasn't, In Gun-Loving Switzerland

Gun enthusiasts take part in a shooting competition at a club outside Zurich. The gun culture is deeply entrenched in Switzerland, where citizens as young as 10 learn to shoot.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 5:34 pm

Switzerland has an entrenched gun culture that is embraced by most of its 8 million citizens, some of them as young as 10 years old.

Every Swiss community has a shooting range, and depending on who is counting, the alpine country ranks third or fourth in the number of guns per capita.

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Lightning Talks
8:00 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Five Minutes Onstage At Ignite Seattle

Ignite Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Randy Stewart

If you had five minutes on stage, what would you say? That's the premise of Ignite Seattle, a regular worldwide event where presenters get five minutes and 20 slides to get a point across. Speakers at this month's event touch on a variety of topics, including viral videos, online dating and how to give up cheese. Ignite Seattle 19 took place at Town Hall on February 20, 2013.

The talk was moderated by The Seattle Times columnist Monica Guzman.

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Tech Culture
11:26 am
Wed March 6, 2013

Spring Break For Geeks: SXSW Interactive Starts Friday

At SXSW 2012, the app "Highlight" was touted but failed to break out like Foursquare or Twitter in years prior.
Jack Plunkett AP

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 12:01 pm

Every year, the South By Southwest music, film and interactive festival gets larger, and navigating the blur of panels, parties and shows gets more daunting. The girth of it all is enough to keep many SXSW old-timers away from Austin this year.

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Sociology
9:00 am
Mon February 11, 2013

The Secret To Being A Happy Couple

What is the secret to being happy in your relationship?
Credit Flickr photo/Rodrigo Vargas

What is “normal” in a romantic relationship? More importantly, what’s “normal” for couples who say they're really happy? UW Sociologist Dr. Pepper Schwartz teamed up with Harvard sociologist James White and wellness entrepreneur Chrisanna Northrup to answer that question. Together they conducted and analyzed the largest human relationship study ever done. We’ll talk with Dr. Schwartz about the “perfect couple.”

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Written Word
10:00 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Why Write Letters?

For the love of the letter.
Credit Flickr photo/Pimthida

People don’t write letters much anymore. They don’t even mail in bills! As a result, the postal service is cutting Saturday mail service to save money. So, let us pause for a moment to reflect on the letter. What is lost if handwritten letters are no longer written? If you still write letters, why do you? Author Nick Bantock ponders those questions with us. Tell us what you think at weekday@kuow.org or call 206.543.5869.

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Books
9:00 am
Tue February 5, 2013

"Fresh Off The Boat" With Eddie Huang

Eddie Huang's "Fresh Off The Boat."
Credit Courtesy/Spiegel & Grau

Eddie Huang stormed through childhood. He fought bigoted kids, defied stereotypes of the "model minority" and partied hard. But he clung to the delights of  his father’s restaurant and the flavors of his mother’s kitchen. Following a stint as a lawyer and a stand-up comic, he returned to his raucous roots, dipped in the flavors of Taiwan, America and the world. Eddie Huang joins us for a conversation about the first-generation immigrant experience he writes about in his new memoir, “Fresh Off the Boat.”

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International Politics
4:07 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Can Israel Live With A Nuclear Iran?

Scheduled for Spotlight at 8 p.m.

Over the summer of 2012, Iran doubled the number of nuclear centrifuges installed in its underground Fordow site despite increased international pressure and economic sanctions. Iran stopped just short of the capacity to produce nuclear fuel. Can Israel live with a nuclear Iran, or could the time be near for a pre-emptive strike? 

Friendships And Family
8:00 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Intersectional Friendships: Debunking Stereotypes About Odd Couples

Odd pair.
Credit Flickr photo/Fixeche

Anna Muraco calls the relationships between gay men and straight women, and straight men and gay women, "intersectional friendships." By interviewing many intersectional friendships, Muraco found the stereotypical reason these relationships are formed is false and limiting in the way we view family, friendship and social norms. Muraco spoke at the University Book Store on January 16, 2013.

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Psychology
8:00 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

"The Wisdom Of Psychopaths" With Kevin Dutton

'The Wisdom Of Psychopaths' by Kevin Dutton.
Credit Courtesy Scientific American/Farrar, Straus and Giroux

"Psychopath" is a weighted, sometimes terrifying word. But psychologist Kevin Dutton makes the argument that not all psychopaths are violent. In fact, some of their qualities -- fearlessness, confidence, charisma -- set them up for success in today's society. Dutton spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on Oct. 30, 2012.

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Sociology
8:00 pm
Thu January 10, 2013

Chaos, Disorder, Uncertainty: A Recipe To Thrive

Nassim Nicholas Taleb at the Digital Life Design conference in 2009.
Credit Flickr photo/nrkbeta.no

How can we thrive in an uncertain world? Nassim Nicholas Taleb identifies a category of things that not only depend on disorder -- they thrive on it. For example: human bones get stronger when subjected to stress, and riots intensify when someone tries to suppress them.

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Life And Culture
10:00 am
Thu December 27, 2012

Our Regrets For 2012

What are your regrets for 2012?
Credit Flickr photo/Germán Garibaldi

The Stranger publishes a regrets issue at the end of every year. It's a list of the mistakes, missed opportunities and blunders made throughout the year. What regrets do you have for 2012? What do you wish you had (or had not) done? We want to hear your stories. David Schmader, associate editor at The Stranger, joins us to share his regrets.  

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Medicine
8:00 pm
Fri December 7, 2012

What Hospitals Don't Tell You

A doctor's stethoscope.
Credit Flickr Photo/Alex Proimos

Medical mistakes are now the third highest cause of death in the United States, writes Dr. Marty Makary. As a surgeon, Makary has witnessed the power of medicine firsthand. But he's also been shocked by the errors that can have tragic circumstances: wrong limbs amputated, children getting the wrong doses of medicine because of bad handwriting, surgical sponges left inside patients.

Makary advocates for a culture that holds hospitals and doctors accountable for these mistakes in order to bring about positive change in this system. He spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on November 15, 2012.

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