culture

Back in 1967 the rules for dating were fairly clear-cut whether you agreed with them or not. Check out this U.S. Navy instructional video, How to Succeed with Brunettes. (What is UP with that title, anyway?)

Professor Vincente Rafael On Filipino Folklore Origins

Aug 25, 2014

Vincente Rafael is a professor of history at the University of Washington, specializing in Philippine history, colonialism and nationalism. RadioActive youth reporter Maria Caoagdan interviewed Rafael for her story exploring Filipino supernatural creatures.

Unraveling The Family Folklore Passed Through Generations

Aug 25, 2014
Courtesy of the Caoagdan family

What if you grew up being told that the monster under your bed is real? Seattle is home to a large Filipino Community, and in the Philippines, superstitions and the existence of supernatural creatures are firmly believed. RadioActive's Maria Delmar Caoagdan was born there, and tells us what it's like.

In my family, whenever we walk through the woods, we say the phrase "tabi tabi po." Why? I don't know.

As a child, I did whatever my family told me and believed whatever they said. Occasionally, I'd also watch horror films that introduced me to Filipino mythological creatures. But after hearing my family's own paranormal encounters, I began to wonder if those myths really have some elements of truth.

Justin Martin's book, "Rebel Souls."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Justin Martin about his book, "Rebel Souls: Walt Whitman and America's First Bohemians."

Nordstrom handout

Jeannie Yandel talks with Jean Kilbourne, creator of the film series, "Killing Us Softly: Advertising’s Image Of Women," about Nordstrom's decision to include disabled models and what that tells us about society.

Is It Time For Washington To Leave The Union?

Jul 16, 2014
Flickr Photo/Neal Jennings (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with anthropologist Chris Roth about Cascadia Now!, which advocates for British Columbia, Washington and Oregon to secede and form an independent nation.

It's summer. It's sweaty. And sometimes that means people are trailing some pungent body odors that their colleagues can't help but smell. But how do you tactfully inform co-workers that they stink and need to address it? As Cath Ludeman-Hall will tell you, it isn't easy.

She was just out of college and a newbie at a staffing firm when she was asked to gently talk to an older worker in a retail warehouse after his colleagues complained that he stank.

Flickr Photo/Jeff Werner (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with University of Maryland doctoral student and National Science Foundation research fellow Jesse Harrington about a new report analyzing the "tightness" and "looseness" of American states in regards to social norms such as sneezing and talking in public places.

Courtesy of WeWork

The millennial generation is taking control over how they work and how they live. The group, currently about 18 to 33 years old, is adopting technology that is disrupting old structures and writing the playbook on how to take advantage of technological change.

Americans want to go their own way.

The right of individuals to question authority is one of the strongest facets of American life. But the ability to strike out on your own has always been balanced against the need for communal action in a complicated, continental country.

Right now, the pendulum is swinging more toward individualism.

Ancient Ritual Kept Alive Through Northwest Trees

May 31, 2013
Courtesy of David Bolnick

There are about 1,000 trees in the Northwest that share something in common. You’d never guess what it is just by looking at them. Some are tiny fruit trees. Others are towering cedars. But, under the soil, they’re connected to the same ancient ritual.

Money
Flickr Photos/Kevin Dooley

In the book "Rethinking Money," economist Bernard Lietaer and journalist Jacqui Dunne trace the beginnings of our monetary system, including its serious problems and hope for the future.

Chess
Flickr Photo/Mary Beth Griffo Rigby

Can we all become more competitive? Journalists Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman argue yes. In their new book, "Top Dog," they use science to analyze the drive to win in each of us, including how to tip the scales in your favor.

Shouting Won't Help
Courtesy/Sarah Crichton Books

Katherine Bouton was going deaf by age 30. During meetings at The New York Times, where she was a section editor, she had trouble hearing what her colleagues were saying during meetings. Shouting, she says, didn't help her hear any better. 

Leslie Helm was born and raised in Yokohama, Japan. Most of his family members are of European descent, and you would be hard pressed to look into his face and see his half-Japanese grandparents reflected back. When he adopted Japanese children, he started exploring his own roots. Leslie Helm takes us along on his journey as a "Yokohama Yankee" — a story that outlines the racial and economic tensions that defined US and Japanese relations for much of the 19th and 20th centuries.

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