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culture

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not here for your interrupting nonsense.
Flickr Photo/Stanford Law (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fYkEXZ

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is known for her fiery written dissents. But she might have honed that talent, in part, because she couldn't get a word in edgewise.


The Pacific Northwest's Gay Men's Motorcycle Club Readies For Pride

Jun 15, 2018

This weekend, Portland holds its annual Pride Parade. The lineup is packed with everyone from Pacific Northwest legend Darcelle XV to LGBTQ+ organizations and lots of local businesses.

Courtesy of Jacob Wesley Sutton

In the wake of school shootings like the one in Parkland, Florida this year, parents are asking: "How do I talk to my child about mass shootings?"

KUOW helped answer that question with a story we did in March.


Mars Hill Church pastor Mark Driscoll in 2011.
Flickr Photo/Mars Hill Church Seattle (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9CHiMZ

What happened during the creation and growth of Mars Hill Church made waves in Seattle and beyond. A charismatic minister, Mark Driscoll, preached in a daring, new way. He sought to make his ministry “culturally relevant,” bringing a hipster attitude to conservative theology. His methods drew people to the church in growing numbers.

Anthony Bourdain is being mourned, of course, by fellow chefs and foodies for his sardonic exposés about what really happens in the kitchens of some of America's best restaurants. And for his travels to explore the world's cuisines. But communities of color, women, people who are gender-different from the perceived norm — those people sent heartbroken tributes, too.

The Trump administration's policy of separating families who are detained after illegally crossing the Southern border has become a lightning rod for the White House's critics.

Hundreds of children have already been separated from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy in May — though the practice has been going on for at least several months.

Editor's Note: In 2016, Anthony Bourdain visited Senegal and spoke with NPR's Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton. Their meal and conversation were filmed for his travel-food show Parts Unknown on CNN. With the news of Bourdain's death, we wanted to revisit our interview with Quist-Arcton about that day.

Updated at 12:28 p.m. ET

Chef and television host Anthony Bourdain was found dead in a hotel room in France, his employer CNN said in a statement Friday morning. He was 61. The network and a French official said the cause of death was suicide.

The stars-and-bars of the Confederate flag painted onto a Juanita senior's face in 1999. Two years earlier, Juanita students shouted racial slurs at the mostly black Garfield High School football team. They sent an apology banner and students had to atten
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

A Kirkland high school voted today, Thursday, on whether to drop their mascot: the Rebels.

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Miss America is waving goodbye to its swimsuit competition, scrapping one of its most iconic elements in an attempt to shift the annual ceremony's emphasis from its longtime focus on contestants' physical beauty.

"Koinonia," a Greek word meaning Christian fellowship or communion that appears a number of times in the Bible, put 14-year-old Karthik Nemmani of McKinney, Texas, over the top at the 2018 Scripps National Spelling Bee on Thursday night.

Courtesy of Randy Stewart

Ignite Seattle is an unusual event. The organizers like to surprise the audience when they can — like that time a couple got married on stage. Thrills like that aside, there’s something thoughtful and genuine in every talk. More often than not, we learn something new. 

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Actress Roseanne Barr says she was "Ambien tweeting" at 2 in the morning when she posted a racist tweet about Valerie Jarrett, a former senior adviser in the Obama White House, that caused ABC to cancel her TV show.

On Aug. 24, 1952, the Silook and Oozevaseuk families of Gambell, Alaska, welcomed a baby girl into the world and introduced her to the island that had been their home for centuries. Gambell is at the western edge of St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea. When the weather is clear, you can see Siberia in the distance.

In a message, which took to church not only those in attendance at the royal wedding of Britain's Prince Harry, 33, and American actress Meghan Markle, 36, on Saturday — but millions watching from across the world — Bishop Michael Bruce Curry preached on the "redemptive power of love."

Curry, the first African-American presiding bishop of the American Episcopal Church encouraged all receiving his message to discover the power of love to make of "this old world a new world."

Missed the festivities? Not to worry. With the assistance of English breakfast tea and freshly made cucumber sandwiches, we live-blogged the royal wedding ceremony from this page.

Updated at 9:01 a.m. ET

According to Kensington Palace, Queen Elizabeth II will give a lunchtime reception for 600 guests at St. George's Hall in Windsor Castle on Saturday. The wedding cake, along with a selection of canapés and "bowl food," will be served.

There was exactly one sink in my first New York apartment, which also featured a bathtub in the kitchen and a toilet tucked away by itself in a room smaller than many closets. It was fine for a person living alone, but when my roommates returned, well, the dishes — from which there was never an escape — piled up fast.

Ronda Broatch

News stories can be disturbing sometimes, but KUOW has a way to help process these stories.

We call it #NewsPoet — and it involves a Pacific Northwest poet writing an original piece inspired by one of our stories.

Today we revisit the story about the last man to be put to death by Washington state.


Starbucks Executive Chairman Howard Schultz said Thursday that Starbucks' bathrooms will now be open to everyone, whether paying customers or not.

"We don't want to become a public bathroom, but we're going to make the right decision 100 percent of the time and give people the key," Schultz said at the Atlantic Council in Washington, D.C. "Because we don't want anyone at Starbucks to feel as if we are not giving access to you to the bathroom because you are 'less than.' We want you to be 'more than.' "

Kelli Russell Agodon is a poet based in Kingston, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

Starting this month KUOW is celebrating local poetry with a series called #NewsPoet.

A Pacific Northwest poet writes an original piece inspired by a KUOW news story. This week we hear from Kingston-based poet Kelli Russel Agodon.


Katy Ellis is a mother and dedicated her poem to Charleena Lyles who was pregnant when she was killed.
KUOW PHOTO/CASEY MARTIN

The news can be troubling and sometimes disturbing. 

For poets it can be a source of inspiration. To help process the stories in our news feeds, we invite poets to write an original piece inspired by a KUOW story for #NewsPoet.


Courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux

You hear of situations where a book comes to a writer in a torrent. In this talk, writer André Aciman tells such a story about his well-loved novel, “Call Me By Your Name,” published in 2007.

Aciman’s book came to renewed acclaim, and some controversy, when the film adaptation became a phenomenon last year. The acclaim: The movie was nominated for multiple awards and won an Academy Award for screenwriter James Ivory. The controversy: Some raised age-of-consent issues about the relationship between 17 year-old Elio and his lover, 24-year-old Oliver.

Courtesy of Sandbox Radio

Over the last few years Speakers Forum has featured broadcasts of the Seattle theatre troupe Sandbox Radio. In that time we came to love the work of actor and comedian Peggy Platt. She wrote and performed skits full of sharp humor and the ironies of life.

Photo Courtesy of Penguin Random House

Marcie Sillman talks to author Michael Finkel about the story of Christopher Knight, a man who lived the life of a hermit for 27 years before he was caught by police in Maine for stealing from the community of North Creek. 

Today KUOW launches a new series celebrating Pacific Northwest writers. 

We invite local poets to write an original piece inspired by a KUOW news story.

It's called NewsPoet and our first is Seattle-based poet Imani Sims.

 

Coming out of the broom closet: Real life witches

Apr 5, 2018
KUOW PHOTO/Zuheera Ali

Are you a fan of "Harry Potter"? Or maybe Sabrina the Teenage Witch? Ever wonder if witchcraft actually involves a wand and broom?

Witch culture is everywhere, from 1990s sitcoms to Halloween costumes. Often, what’s left out of the equation is input from real witches.

We headed down to our local occult store, Edge of the Circle Books, to learn about actual witchcraft practices, cultural differences and witches' takes on media representation.


The George Washington statue on the University of Washington Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1jEzCcs

Bill Radke talks to historian, author and former This American Life contributor Sarah Vowell about America's troubled history and how it can better help us understand today. 

Bill Radke talks to Melanie McFarland, TV critic at Salon about the new reboot of Roseanne and what it says about America today. 

Flickr Photo/The West End (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fqqMid

Bill Radke talks to Naomi Tomky, Seattle food writer about a dish that she thinks is a strong contender to be Seattle's 'signature dish.' Hint: there is seafood involved. No, not geoduck. Seattle TV critic Melanie McFarland joins the conversation. 

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