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Flickr Photo/raromachine (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Detective Julie Cook from Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife recently solved a case she’s been working on since 2012. Cook worked undercover selling crabs, posing as the fisherman’s wife or girlfriend (women aren’t typically fishermen), hauling the catch around town in a dirty pickup.

A north Idaho teenager accused of killing his father and brother is no longer being held in solitary confinement at an adult county jail.

The monthly jobs report is out: the economy added 209,000 jobs in July, while the unemployment rate ticked up just barely — from 6.1 to 6.2 percent — as more Americans started looking for work.

It’s the sixth straight month where job gains in the U.S. have topped 200,000 — a strong indication that the economy is healthy and growing.

But numbers alone only tell part of the story. Another piece: many of the high-paying jobs that were lost in the recession are being disproportionately replaced with low-paying ones.

You’ve heard of your Miranda rights, but did you know that most state constitutions also give you a right to a bail bondsman?

Jennifer Hopper in KUOW's green room in 2014.
KUOW Photo/Akiko Oda

A life can change in a moment.

For Jennifer Hopper, that moment was July 19, 2009, the night Isaiah Kalebu broke into the South Park home that Hopper shared with her fiancée Teresa Butz. The man repeatedly stabbed and raped the two women. Butz died on the street in front of her home.

Patricia Murphy

A Level 3 sex offender charged with kidnapping a child returns to court this week. Prosecutors say Jesse Brisbin snatched a 6-year-old girl from a park in Beacon Hill and assaulted her.

Brisbin, who has pleaded not guilty, has been supervised by the Department of Corrections since 2011. His arrest highlights how difficult it can be to manage the state's highest risk sex offenders who have been released from prison.

Two men who produced marijuana candy appeared in federal court Friday for a detention hearing . They’re accused of endangering others while manufacturing marijuana extracts.

Flickr Photo/Blake Burkhart (Cc-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1WmamK7

Ross Reynolds talks with Bruce Stedman, Arlington's acting police chief, and Doug Honig, ACLU of Washington's communications director, about the city's strict new approach to panhandling.

The ACLU of Idaho has joined the fight to move an accused teenage killer out of solitary confinement and back into juvenile detention.

Police in Washington can “stop and frisk” individuals they have specific reason to believe may be armed. But if that search goes beyond a “brief and nonintrusive” search, then it’s unconstitutional.

Washington’s prison system has announced a major policy change when it comes to inmates who harm themselves. The Department of Corrections said Thursday that it will no longer sanction inmates for cutting or other acts of self-injury.

Seattle City Council / University of Washington

Treat people hospitalized for gunshot injuries as you would treat addicts.

That’s the counsel of Dr. Fred Rivara, a professor of pediatrics, who headed a University of Washington study that found that patients who had been shot were more likely to be arrested within five years than people with a psychiatric history.

A new documentary by Fusion tells the story of Tenancingo, Mexico — just a few hours south of Mexico City. Tenancingo is in the Mexican state that is the single largest source of sex slaves who are sent to the U.S., according to the U.S. State Department.

Fusion’s documentary, “Pimp City: A Journey to the Center of the Sex Slave Trade,” takes place on both sides of the border: in Tenancingo and in Queens, New York. Many of the women taken in Tenancingo wind up working in Queens.

In what Northwest city is your car most likely to be stolen? According to a new insurance industry report, the answer is Spokane, Washington.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Twenty-three years ago, acting Captain Steve Strand was patrolling Columbia City on a mountain bike, busting alleyway crack dealers. The officers under his charge are still patrolling on mountain bikes, but the neighborhood landscape has changed.

Underneath the charm of Martha's Vineyard's picturesque beaches, peaceful woods and luxury homes is a problem: Since August, there have been six overdose deaths on the island.

"That's a phenomenal rate for a community of 16,000 people — and that's not to mention the overdoses that haven't been fatal," says Charles Silberstein, an addiction specialist and psychiatrist at Martha's Vineyard Hospital. "We've had overdoses for years, but I don't think we've ever seen this kind of number or frequency."

A veteran King County Sheriff’s deputy is behind bars after an investigation found that he had pimped his wife, stolen equipment from the county gun range and pedaled steroids.

Japan Bans Possession Of Child Pornography

Jun 18, 2014

Japan has banned the possession of child pornography, with some notable exceptions: manga, animation and computer graphics.

Parliament's upper house approved the measure Wednesday; the lower house passed the bill last month.

Suppose you spent five years in prison for a crime you didn't commit. How much does the government owe you?

Over the past few decades, the rise of DNA exonerations has made this a more pressing question. And many states have created explicit policies to answer it.

But those policies vary wildly from state to state.

Twenty-one states provide no money — though people who are exonerated can sue for damages. Twelve states and the District of Columbia award damages on a case-by-case basis. Another 17 states pay a fixed amount per year of imprisonment.

Get out. Hide out. Take out. That’s the lesson employees at the Washington state Capitol got Wednesday in a class on active shooters. The refresher course comes in the wake of recent high profile shootings in the Northwest.

SPU shooting: Seattle Pacific University students pray and comfort each other the day after a campus shooting on Thursday, June 4, 2014.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The man held in the shootings at Seattle Pacific University could go to prison for life.

Aaron Ybarra was charged in Superior Court on Tuesday with one count of first-degree murder, two counts of attempted murder and one count of assault for the shootings last Thursday. If convicted as charged, he could face up to 86 years in prison.

Flowers at a memorial for the 2014 Seattle Pacific University shooting.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman talks with Northeastern University criminologist James Alan Fox about crime data and why we are so quick to search for a trend in the midst of tragedy.

How The Media Can Help Prevent Mass Shootings

Jun 10, 2014
Flickr Photo/Travis S.

Forensic psychologist Dr. Park Dietz worries the media has encouraged copycats of mass shootings. Recently, there have been two college shootings in as many weeks.

“The longer we continue the coverage, the more colorful, emotionally-arousing and biographical about the shooter that coverage is, the more imitators we’ll attract,” Dietz told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on The Record. Sillman spoke with Dietz on Friday, the day after a shooting at Seattle Pacific University left one dead and three wounded.

Flickr Photo/M Glasgow (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about competing gun ballot initiatives in Washington in light of the recent Seattle Pacific University shooting.

Stevan Dozier's crimes were violent purse snatchings. The final time, he hit his 69-year old victim in the face, knocked her to the ground and stole her wallet. As a result, Dozier was one of the first to be sentenced under the voter-approved "three strikes" law back in 1994.

Marcie Sillman talks to Greg Crane, president and founder of ALICE: Alert Lockdown Inform Counter Evacuate. He explains what he believes are the best practices are for responding to an active shooting situation.

In journalism school, student reporters learn to never, ever, ever name suspects until they have been charged in court.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

On Thursday afternoon, Daniel Martin received the text that every university president dreads: His campus was on lockdown. There was a gunman.

Courtesy Jillian Smith

Updated 9:20 p.m. PT:

One person was killed and three others were wounded on Thursday afternoon when a lone suspect entered a classroom building at Seattle Pacific University and opened fire with a shotgun, according to police officials.

The effects of a sexual assault can be long-lasting, but the medical bills aren't supposed to be.

Yet a study published recently finds that despite federal efforts to lift that burden from rape victims, a hodgepodge of state rules mean some victims may still be charged for medical services related to rape, including prevention and treatment of pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections.

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