crime

Clean Slate For Tribal Fishing Rights Protesters?

Jan 15, 2014

Around 40 to 50 years ago, American Indians in Western Washington were repeatedly arrested during protests over treaty fishing rights.

The recent disclosure that a large trove of customer information was stolen from Target, and now also from Neiman Marcus, points to growing vulnerabilities in cybersecurity. And experts say the problem is becoming more difficult to combat.

Feds Search Seattle Coach’s Home For Child Porn

Jan 10, 2014

The US Department of Homeland Security has searched the home of a Seattle coach and substitute teacher at The Bush School for evidence he was producing and distributing child pornography.

City of Seattle Photo

A recently released report commissioned by the Seattle City Attorney’s office has found that one of its supervising prosecutors may have violated criminal law and professional rules for attorneys.

Three months after resigning, that prosecutor, Jennifer Grant, got a temporary job with Seattle Municipal Court as a magistrate.

More than 40 years ago, on the evening of March 8, 1971, a group of burglars carried out an audacious plan. They pried open the door of an FBI office in Pennsylvania and stole files about the bureau's surveillance of anti-war groups and civil rights organizations.

Hundreds of agents tried to identify the culprits, but the crime went unsolved. Until now.

KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Djin Kwie Liem estimates he lost 20,000 fish.

“Goldfish, koi, tropical fish,” he specified.

Repeat drunk drivers in Washington who get arrested in the New Year may find themselves ordered to blow into a breathalyzer twice a day.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Former death row inmate Darold Stenson was sent back to prison yesterday for the murder of his wife, Denise Stenson, and business partner, Frank Hoerner.

Seattle Police are applauding the efforts of three bus riders who stopped a man robbing fellow passengers at gunpoint.

FBI Photo

If you don’t know the story of D.B. Cooper, the short version goes like this:

On Nov. 24, 1971, a man referred to as D.B. Cooper hijacked a Boeing 727 on a flight between Portland, Ore., and Seattle. He extorted $200,000 in ransom, and parachuted from the plane. No one has ever seen him since.

A Special Agent's Secret Job: Hit Man

Nov 24, 2013

GQ Magazine correspondent Jeanne Marie Laskas calls him "Special Agent Charles Hunt," but that's not his real name. He's sometimes known as "Thrash" or "Hammer," Laskas says (also not his real name).

That's because Hunt is a special agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, specializing in deep undercover work. Specifically, he poses as a contract killer.

A U.S. Army Sergeant will be transferred to Joint Base Lewis-McChord to face charges he murdered two unarmed, deaf boys in Iraq in 2007.

Working In The Shadows To Keep Web Free Of Child Porn

Nov 18, 2013
Courtesy of Toronto Police

Rich Brown knows how to crack a child pornography case. For decades, he was a cop for the New Jersey State Police. He worked on a task force dedicated to Internet crimes against children. And part of his job was to look through suspects' hard drives, image by image.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We start this story with a warning. Some people may find the subject unsettling. People with kids in the room may wish to skip the next six minutes. Years ago, police in Toronto, Canada began tracking a suspect in their city. With the help of police in other nations, they quietly began linking him to a global network of people trafficking in child pornography.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

The Washington State Supreme Court has ruled that King County prosecutors can seek the death penalty against accused police killer Christopher Monfort. 

Monfort is charged with aggravated murder in the shooting death of Seattle police officer Tim Brenton four years ago. The high court also wrote that a King County judge improperly intruded on the prosecutor’s discretion to pursue a capital case.

Pages