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Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a book reportedly written by Canadian serial killer Robert Pickton. The book was briefly available on Amazon and has now been removed from the site. 

Andre Taylor (left), Davitta Briscoe (center) and Brenda Taylor - all members of the late Che Taylor's family - appear at an NAACP news conference in February.
KUOW PHOTO/PAIGE BROWNING

Emotions running high, about 100 people gathered at the site of the shooting in Northeast Seattle last night.

Che Taylor, 47, was shot by police in the Wedgwood neighborhood, in the 2200 block of Northeast 85th Street.

Canada's government is preparing to launch a major inquiry on murdered or missing aboriginal women.

A 2014 study by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police found that nearly 1,200 aboriginal women were murdered or went missing between 1980 and 2012. But two government ministers involved in planning the investigation say they believe the numbers are actually far higher.

Barry Massey became a symbol for juvenile justice reform after he was sentenced to life in prison without parole at age 14. Now 42, Massey was released Tuesday after a change in state law.

At age 15, Barry Massey walked into the Monroe Corrections Center to begin to serve a life sentence. The year was 1988. At the time, Massey was the youngest person in the United States sentenced to life without parole. On Tuesday, Massey walked out of that same prison a free man.

One of the Vatican's most prominent critics, who pushed for greater protections for children and harsher punishments for pedophile priests, has taken a leave of absence from the pope's advisory commission on clerical sex abuse.

File photo of a homeless encampment under a bridge.
KUOW Photo

Charges were filed Thursday in Seattle against three teenage brothers for the shootings in the homeless encampment known as the Jungle. The two older siblings will be tried as adults for first-degree murder and assault. Their younger brother will face the same charges in juvenile court.

Previously, on Serial ...

"All this time I thought the courts proved it was Adnan that killed her. I thought he was where he deserved to be. Now I'm not so sure."

That's an email from Asia McClain to host Sarah Koenig, as read on the very first episode of Serial, the podcast sensation produced by the creators of This American Life.

Jennifer Hopper in KUOW's green room in 2014.
KUOW Photo/Akiko Oda

Bill Radke speaks with Eli Sanders, Pulitzer-prize winning author of "While The City Slept," about the attack on a hot summer night that changed three Seattle lives forever. On July 19, 2009, Isaiah Kalebu broke into the South Park home that Jennifer Hopper shared with her fiancée Teresa Butz. The man repeatedly stabbed and raped the two women. Butz died on the street in front of her home.

Also, Katy Sewall talks to Hopper about how she feels about having her name forever connected to that attack. For more from Hopper, check out another interview she did with KUOW in 2014. 

Eli Sanders and Jennifer Hopper will join KUOW's Marcie Sillman in conversation at Town Hall Seattle on Wednesday, Feb. 3 at 7:30 pm. More information on the event can be found here.

Once again this week, an investigation into Planned Parenthood's alleged sale of fetal tissue came up empty.

Darcie Day heads out to sell Real Change newspaper in Seattle after shooting in the 'Jungle.'
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Word of the shootings at the homeless encampment known as the Jungle on Tuesday spread quickly among the vendors for the weekly newspaper Real Change. Many of them are homeless or have been homeless. They spoke to KUOW’s Amy Radil in the newspaper’s offices in Pioneer Square about the danger of being homeless.

Included in this audio postcard are Darcie Day, Nick Maxwell and Susan Russell.

A Washington State Patrol trooper looks on as a homeless camp is cleaned out at the corner of Airport Way South and South Royal Brougham Way on Wednesday, January 27, 2016. That's a short way from where two people were shot to death in 'The Jungle.'
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Tuesday’s shootings in a homeless camp in Seattle added to the sense of crisis on the issue of homelessness. They took place just as Mayor Murray prepared to deliver a speech on the problem.

Nearby, state and city officials continued to clear homeless encampments.  

Former Oklahoma City police officer Daniel Holtzclaw, who was found guilty of raping and sexually assaulting multiple women while on his beat, was sentenced to 263 years in prison.

Holtzclaw's sentencing Thursday was temporarily delayed, after his attorney requested a new trial. Holtzclaw claimed there was evidence that hadn't been presented at trial.

The judge rejected the request, and sentenced Holtzclaw to 263 years in prison, to be served consecutively. That's the maximum sentence, and the one which had been recommended by a jury last month.

For months, FBI Director James Comey has been warning about a troubling spike in homicides in some of America's biggest cities.

On Tuesday, the bureau released preliminary crime statistics that back up some of his concerns. The FBI reported that violent crime rose in the first six months of 2015, with murders increasing by more than 6 percent over that same stretch the year before.

Michael J. Cody
BishopAccountability.org

When the Seattle Archdiocese released names of 77 abusive clergy last week, many Catholics heralded a new era of transparency.

Seattle resident Ignacio Lanuza
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A former government attorney in Seattle pleaded guilty Friday to falsifying documents in a deportation case. KUOW’s race and culture reporter Liz Jones has been following this lawsuit.

Michael J. Cody
BishopAccountability.org

The Archdiocese of Seattle on Friday named 77 Catholic clergy or religious order members accused of sexually abusing minors.

Those on the list served or lived in Western Washington between 1923 and 2008, the archdiocese said in a statement. The list includes names of priests that haven’t been disclosed publicly before.  

For the third time in less than a year, a Washington state employee has been accused of having sex with a juvenile offender. The most recent arrest happened this week at a state juvenile lock-up in Chehalis.

A photocopy of the Seattle Times' front page the day after 9-year-old George Weyerhaeuser returned home to Tacoma. A sports reporter found him in Issaquah and drove him home.
Seattle Public Library archives

It was the Northwest’s most notorious kidnapping case. Little George Weyerhaeuser had been snatched off the streets of Tacoma and held for $200,000 ransom.  

Eighty years later, Weyerhaeuser, the timber titan, told me he hadn’t read much news coverage about his kidnapping. 

He has a vivid memory of those eight days, he said, but he hadn’t dug through those old stories from 1935. He was 9 at the time, after all, and his parents wanted to leave the kidnapping in the past. They wanted him to grow up without this traumatic event hanging over his life.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee used his State of the State speech to pledge accountability when government fails. The Democrat’s comments Tuesday follow the early release of more than 3,000 prison inmates because of a computer coding error.

The Internet had many, many responses to actor Sean Penn's account of meeting Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, which was published by Rolling Stone on Saturday: shock, anger, derision, astonishment, utter bafflement ...

But from one quarter, at least, there was pure excitement.

"EL CHAPO GUZMAN WEARING BARABAS SHIRT !" was the all-caps announcement from the clothing company Barabas.

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán had seen his name in headlines. He knew it graced the world's Most Wanted lists.

But it appears that the notorious drug kingpin wanted something more: He wanted his name in lights.

Nearly six months after his most recent escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico, drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán has been caught, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced via Twitter.

It was a memorable name: Thelonious Monk, like the jazz musician.

And when Adam Marton read it, a decade-old memory came flooding back.

Marton is an editor at The Baltimore Sun. He was working on an infographic about the homicides in Baltimore in 2015 — a record 344 deaths, most of them black men, most of them shot to death.

Thelonious Monk was one of those victims. And years before, Marton says, Monk had stolen his car.

R
Margarito Perez/Reuters

On New Year's Day, Gisela Mota was sworn in as the new mayor of Temixco, south of Mexico City.

Less than a day later, she was dead. Gunmen had burst into her home, beaten and shot her to death. Two of the attackers were killed in a shootout with the police; at least two others were arrested.

Mota's brutal death is another grim reminder of the violence that grips Mexico. Over the past decade, at least 70 mayors have been murdered and many others targeted, according to Alejandro Hope, security editor for El Daily Post in Mexico City.

The era of the real-life whodunit series is upon us. The podcast Serial first attracted legions of listeners drawn to the question of whether a young man should have been put in prison for the murder of his former high school girlfriend. HBO's documentary The Jinx focused on a trail of murdered and missing intimates of a troubled scion of a wealthy family.

File photo: Washington Corrections Center for Women
KUOW Photo/Kevin P. Casey

  A second tragedy is now linked to a Washington state prison inmate who was released before his sentence was completed due to a software error. The Department of Corrections said a 17-year-old boy was killed during a robbery in Spokane last May.

Bill Radke talks with Mary Ellen Stone about a forthcoming legislative proposal that would test a large portion of Washington's unprocessed rape kits. Stone is executive director of the King County Sexual Assault Resource Center.

Ethan Couch — the "affluenza teen" who killed four people while driving drunk two years ago and recently fled to Mexico with his mother — has been granted a temporary stay against his extradition to the U.S. His mother was deported to Los Angeles on Wednesday evening.

Couch and his mother were detained in Mexico on Monday. They originally had been scheduled to return to the U.S. on Wednesday, where Ethan Couch would face a hearing before a juvenile court judge.

A man who was released from a Washington prison early by mistake is charged with killing a mother of two when he should have still been locked up.

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