crime

Japan Bans Possession Of Child Pornography

Jun 18, 2014

Japan has banned the possession of child pornography, with some notable exceptions: manga, animation and computer graphics.

Parliament's upper house approved the measure Wednesday; the lower house passed the bill last month.

When Innocent People Go To Prison, States Pay

Jun 16, 2014

Suppose you spent five years in prison for a crime you didn't commit. How much does the government owe you?

Over the past few decades, the rise of DNA exonerations has made this a more pressing question. And many states have created explicit policies to answer it.

But those policies vary wildly from state to state.

Twenty-one states provide no money — though people who are exonerated can sue for damages. Twelve states and the District of Columbia award damages on a case-by-case basis. Another 17 states pay a fixed amount per year of imprisonment.

Get out. Hide out. Take out. That’s the lesson employees at the Washington state Capitol got Wednesday in a class on active shooters. The refresher course comes in the wake of recent high profile shootings in the Northwest.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The man held in the shootings at Seattle Pacific University could go to prison for life.

Aaron Ybarra was charged in Superior Court on Tuesday with one count of first-degree murder, two counts of attempted murder and one count of assault for the shootings last Thursday. If convicted as charged, he could face up to 86 years in prison.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman talks with Northeastern University criminologist James Alan Fox about crime data and why we are so quick to search for a trend in the midst of tragedy.

How The Media Can Help Prevent Mass Shootings

Jun 10, 2014
Flickr Photo/Travis S.

Forensic psychologist Dr. Park Dietz worries the media has encouraged copycats of mass shootings. Recently, there have been two college shootings in as many weeks.

“The longer we continue the coverage, the more colorful, emotionally-arousing and biographical about the shooter that coverage is, the more imitators we’ll attract,” Dietz told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on The Record. Sillman spoke with Dietz on Friday, the day after a shooting at Seattle Pacific University left one dead and three wounded.

Flickr Photo/M Glasgow (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about competing gun ballot initiatives in Washington in light of the recent Seattle Pacific University shooting.

Stevan Dozier's crimes were violent purse snatchings. The final time, he hit his 69-year old victim in the face, knocked her to the ground and stole her wallet. As a result, Dozier was one of the first to be sentenced under the voter-approved "three strikes" law back in 1994.

Marcie Sillman talks to Greg Crane, president and founder of ALICE: Alert Lockdown Inform Counter Evacuate. He explains what he believes are the best practices are for responding to an active shooting situation.

In journalism school, student reporters learn to never, ever, ever name suspects until they have been charged in court.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

On Thursday afternoon, Daniel Martin received the text that every university president dreads: His campus was on lockdown. There was a gunman.

Courtesy Jillian Smith

Updated 9:20 p.m. PT:

One person was killed and three others were wounded on Thursday afternoon when a lone suspect entered a classroom building at Seattle Pacific University and opened fire with a shotgun, according to police officials.

The effects of a sexual assault can be long-lasting, but the medical bills aren't supposed to be.

Yet a study published recently finds that despite federal efforts to lift that burden from rape victims, a hodgepodge of state rules mean some victims may still be charged for medical services related to rape, including prevention and treatment of pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections.

The U.S. has devoted billions of dollars to fighting terrorism overseas in the years since the Sept. 11 attacks.

The Justice Department is increasingly warning about the danger posed by radicals on American soil, and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder wants prosecutors and FBI agents to devote more attention to the threat.

Nearly two decades ago, after the Oklahoma City bombing killed 168 people, the Justice Department launched a group to fight domestic terrorism.

KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Katie Kuffel was losing her nerve.

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