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Thom Pasiecki, 24, says that after he lost his job in Connecticut and broke up with his girlfriend, he realized he needed help with an online gaming addiction.
KUOW photo/Jamala Henderson

Thom Piasecki is on day 19 of digital rehab at a rural retreat in eastern King County.

His daily routine is mostly outside, walking on dirt paths through forested areas, feeding chickens and doves, and checking on goldfish in a tub outside. 

A police van at Third Avenue and Pine Street in downtown Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

There’s an open air drug market between Westlake Center and the Pike Place Market. People who live and work downtown are getting tired of dealing with that. So are business owners.

"You’re facing shoplifting multiple times a day, you’re seeing people overdose in your bathroom, you’re cleaning up heroin needles," the Downtown Seattle Association’s Jon Scholes said.

Now the city of Seattle is trying to do something about it.

There have been 95 arrests over the last few days – without a single incident of use of force, Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole says.

This county road between Maple Valley and Issaquah may not look like a major traffic corridor. But come rush hour, it's bumper to bumper on county roads like this as commuters seek out alternate routes to shave precious minutes off grueling commutes.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

 

In East King County, a critical piece of infrastructure is falling apart: the county road system. That's 1,500 miles of mostly two-lane roads. Stretched out, they would reach from Canada to Mexico. There’s no money to repair them properly. So the county’s going to have to lower the speed limits and eventually shut some of them down.

Bernie Lau when he first became a Seattle Police officer in the early 1970s. Lau soon became a detective working undercover in Chinatown, as the International District was known then.
Courtesy of Bernie Lau

In late January of 1983, Seattle homicide detectives contacted me and asked if I knew the whereabouts of a young Chinese individual named Benjamin Ng.

A week earlier, two women  had been murdered in their home on Beacon Hill. Someone had tied them up and wrapped duct tape around their heads, covering their mouths and noses. 

Chris Stolte at a Tableau Customer Conference in 2013.
From Tableau's Facebook page

Ross Reynolds speaks with Chris Stolte, chief development officer and co-founder of Tableau Software, a Seattle data visualization company whose goal is to make tools accessible to people who are not data nerds.

In this Nov. 20, 2008, file photo, the execution chamber at the Washington State Penitentiary is shown with the witness gallery behind glass at right, in Walla Walla, Wash.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Ross Reynolds talks to Washington state Rep. Maureen Walsh, R-Walla Walla, co-sponsor of a bipartisan bill seeking to abolish the death penalty in Washington and replace it with a life sentence. The bill comes almost a year after Governor Jay Inslee imposed a statewide moratorium on capital punishment. 

Michael Young speaks at a cherry tree gift reception at the University of Washington on May 20, 2014.
Flickr Photo/University Marketing (CC-BY-NC-ND)

    

Ross Reynolds speaks with Washington state Sen. Barbara Bailey, chair of the Senate Committee on Higher Education, about University of Washington President Michael Young's surprise decision to leave and take the top job at Texas A&M University.

Seattle's Department of Transportation is providing $2.3 million to go toward a change in start times for Seattle Public Schools.
Flickr Photo/tncountryfan

Two state representatives want to divide Seattle Public Schools into two smaller districts.

“Seattle public schools is a broken system for many students for many families and something has to change,” said Sharon Tomiko-Santos, a Democrat from South Seattle.

Seagull Project company members in Uzbekistan.
Courtesy of the Seagull Project

When a Seattle theater troupe decided to make the long journey to Tashkent, Uzbekistan last spring, the artists had no idea what was in store for them.

"We had meetings with the American embassy that helped us get over there," says director John Langs.

"They basically said don't do anything or say anything in your hotel room that you wouldn't want your grandmother to hear or see, because you will be bugged."

The Kalakala on the day she was to be scrapped. The unlucky vessel had shone on Puget Sound waters as a ferry from 1935 to 1967.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

It was before dawn on Thursday, and the cold air off the Blair Waterway in Tacoma was damp and penetrating.

Karl Anderson, a mustachioed man in his 70s, stood on his company’s graving dock, waiting for the Kalakala.

Is Class Size Reduction Cost Effective?

Nov 4, 2014
School desk
Flickr Photo/ccarlstead (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Robin Lake, director of the Center on Reinventing Public Education, about whether spending billions on class size reduction is the best use of Washington's resources.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

The King County Sheriff’s Department is investigating after a bottle exploded in a Redmond elementary school parking lot, injuring two bus drivers.

The 2-liter plastic bottle exploded just after 7:30 this morning at Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

No students were injured in the blast, which occurred more than an hour before classes began.

Bomb deputies from the King County Sheriff's Department said it was an acid bomb and that it was not a sophisticated device.

Ross Reynolds talks to Christopher Soghoian, privacy expert for the ACLU, about a 2007 case where the FBI created a fake news link and sent it to a student they suspected was calling in bomb threats to Timberline High School. The link planted malware on the suspect's computer that the FBI was able to use to track and convict the teen.    

Correction: An earlier version of this story misstated which news outlet the FBI used to bait the student suspected of making bomb threats. It was The Associated Press, not The Seattle Times as the guest noted in the radio interview.

Who Are The Descendants Of Seattle's Early Families?

Oct 19, 2014
KUOW/Joshua McNichols

What are the descendants of Seattle's pioneers up to? KUOW Listener Ben Lee wanted to know.

For KUOW's Local Wonder project, I escaped into Seattle's past in hopes of turning up the present. Turned out that finding Seattle's dead pioneers was the easy part. 

They’re all in one spot: Lakeview Cemetery on Capitol Hill.

Suzan DelBene
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Voters in Washington’s 1st Congressional District will decide whether to return their freshman member of Congress to Washington, D.C. or replace her with a political unknown.

Incumbent Democrat Suzan DelBene is being challenged by Republican Pedro Celis. The two are facing off in the state’s only true partisan battleground.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

When we talk about guns, rarely do we speak with reluctant gun owners, particularly parents who have decided that owning a firearm is safer than not and who struggle with how to discuss gun safety with their kids.

  Ross Reynolds speaks with novelist David Mitchell about what he says is the most important book he's done: a translation of a memoir by a young autistic Japanese boy. In the book, "The Reason I Jump," the boy explains the behaviors that may seem strange to outsiders. Mitchell himself has a child with autism. He talks about what he learned from doing the translation.

Compost, Seattleites! (Or Risk Being Fined)

Sep 22, 2014
Flickr Photo/Dianne Yee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It'll be a busy day at Seattle city hall Monday. Mayor Ed Murray is proposing his first city budget since he was elected last fall.

Among other things, the mayor is expected to announce funding for more police officers and for his preschool proposal.

Further down the agenda, though, is a smaller item that could add up to something big.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Fifteen children, ages 6 months to 14 years, are being treated at Seattle Children's Hospital for a severe respiratory illness known as entero virus.

Washington Congressman Denny Heck said the Department of Health and Human Services is no longer seeking facilities for temporary shelters for refugee children at Washington’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

Heck, who represents the 10th Congressional District which includes JBLM, said he trusts the department to make the right decisions about what facilities are best for the refugee children, but adds that he will continue to push for what he calls common sense, comprehensive immigration reform.

It’s the season of summer camps, but kids with autism or ADHD are often left out because of behavior issues. But next week, they’ll get have another option, through a joint program between UW Autism Center and Seattle Children’s Hospital.

University of Washington, Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence

When you do an image search on the web, you might find what you're looking for. Those searches use captions and other text around pictures to give you results. But what if a computer could recognize a horse because it was shaped like a horse? That's what a new program called LEVAN can do.

Seattle Public Schools

Seattle Public Schools Superintendent Jose Banda has been named the finalist for superintendent of Sacramento City Unified School District. If Banda accepts the position, he would be leaving Seattle after two years, with two years left on his current contract.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan slammed a lawsuit filed by more than a hundred Seattle police officers who filed a legal complaint against city and federal officials. The officers say a new policy that dictates how police can use force restricts their constitutional rights to protect themselves.

Kjetil Korslien / Flickr

The potential bankruptcy sale of a company that stores online student data – including personally identifiable information for about 20,000 Seattle middle and high school students – has concerned the Federal Trade Commission and Seattle Public Schools. 

KUOW/Kara McDermott

Affordable housing means spending 30 percent or less of household income on housing, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor

Boeing is buying a software company that it says will make planes more fuel efficient.

Why Is It So Hard To Find The Price Of A Medical Procedure?

May 22, 2014
Flickr Photo/401(K) 2013

Steve Scher talks with Sean Sullivan, a professor at the University of Washington School of Pharmacy, about the importance of transparency for health care costs and what individuals can do to find out the expense of their health services.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

About 3.2 million people in the U.S. have hepatitis C, a highly contagious virus that can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Dr. Jody Rich, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at The Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University in Rhode Island, said prisons carry a heavy load of the disease, but they also have built in health care.

EPA Photo

The Environmental Protection Agency is working to remove hundreds of containers of hazardous chemicals from a Craftsman home in Seattle's Green Lake neighborhood.

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