correction

Genetic Engineering
5:51 pm
Mon August 19, 2013

GMO Labeling Backers Outspend Foes In Washington

The busy labels of Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Correction 8/22/13: A previous version of this story contained errors. It overstated the contributions received by the Yes on 522 campaign and the share of donations received from Washington state. The Yes campaign has amassed $3.5 (not 3.9) million, with 79 (not 71) percent of the funds coming from out of state. The nonprofit MapLight, based in Berkeley, Calif., informed us on Aug. 21 that it had double-counted some contributions, which led to the errors.

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Alaskan Way Viaduct
8:11 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Problems And Progress For Seattle's Waterfront Tunnel

Architect Brian Runberg climbing onto the roof of the building he owns, with a building motion detector above him and the Alaskan Way Viaduct directly behind him.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The world’s largest tunneling machine started grinding into the soil beneath downtown Seattle Tuesday afternoon. The machine known as Bertha is digging a 58-foot-wide tunnel to replace the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

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Yum!
11:42 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Getting Fresh With Ross And Sheryl: Converting Squash Skeptics

Squash the skepticism, squash rules!
Credit Sheryl Wiser

Correction 7/25/2013: Sheryl provided the following correction regarding her friend Zephyr Paquette's summer squash preparation: After grating the squash, add some herbs and salt, and let sit for 10 minutes, not seconds.

Summer squash doesn't necessarily incite delight at first glance but Sheryl Wiser of the Cascade Harvest Coalition joins Ross Reynolds to destroy the myth that squash is merely a vessel for other flavors. We hear squash recipes and find out how to pick the sweetest squash at the farmers markets. Plus! Did you know it is actually a fruit? 

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Listener Call-In
11:39 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Is The Minimum Wage Too Low?

Correction 7/24/13:  In the original broadcast of this interview we misstated that Seattle City Council candidate Kshama Sawant advocates a minimum wage of $21.72 an hour. According to her campaign representative Devin Matthews, Sawant is calling for a $15.00 dollar minimum wage. 

A recent economic survey showed it costs over $52,000  for a one parent and one child family to live a modest lifestyle in Seattle. Would raising the minimum wage to $15.00 an hour bring more people closer to earning a living wage? Or would a $15.00 minimum wage just discourage employers from hiring? Ross Reynolds talks to Felix Salmon, financial reporter for Reuters, about the case for each side, and callers share their opinions on if we should raise the minimum wage.

Ferry Rate Changes
5:51 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Proposal: Half-Price Youth Fares On Wash. State Ferries

The Washington State Ferries' M/V Quinault approaches the Keystone landing on Whidbey Island.
Credit Flickr Photo/A. Davey

Correction 7/9/13: A previous version of this story erroneously stated that on the Seattle-Bainbridge ferry, the peak season, round-trip fare for a car and driver would go up $0.90 to $17.30. That total was a one-way fare. In fact, the round-trip fare would increase $1.80, to $34.60.

If you ride the Washington State Ferries, prepare to pay a bit more. The Washington State Transportation Commission wants to increase fares by about six percent within the next year. The commission says the rate hike is needed to meet revenue targets set by the legislature in the 2013-2015 transportation budget.

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Sequester Furloughs
8:13 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Mandatory Furloughs Tough On Employees At Madigan Army Medical Center

Staff Sgt. David Kolodziejczak draws blood out of the arm of an ROTC cadet at the Madigan Army Medical Center (Joint Base Lewis-McChord).
Flickr Photo/Army Medicine

Correction 7/8/2013: A previous version of this story contained an error. Furloughs begin Monday, July 8, not Friday, July 12.

Beginning Monday, more than 2,600 civilian employees at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma will begin mandatory one-day-a-week furloughs.

The furloughs are a result of the federal spending cuts known as sequestration.

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Aging Bridge Concerns
8:58 am
Tue June 4, 2013

King County Plans To Close Kent Bridge Earlier Than Scheduled

King County Executive Dow Constantine (left) accompanies inspectors during a recent review of the Alvord T. Bridge
King County

Correction 6/4/2013: A previous version of this story had a typographical error. The bridge is scheduled to be closed June 5, not June 6.

King County plans to close an old bridge near Kent earlier than originally scheduled, officials said Monday.

The Alvord T. Bridge is both structurally deficient and functionally obsolete. It’s the first such closure since last month’s I-5 bridge collapse in Skagit County.

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Women's Health
9:55 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Who Should Get A Genetic Test For Breast Cancer?

Correction 5/15/2013: A previous version on this story stated that Jolie had a one in 87 chance of getting breast cancer when in fact she had an 87 percent chance.

Now, the public knows about Angelina Jolie’s double mastectomy. She wrote in the New York Times that, thanks to genetic testing, she believed there was an 87 percent chance she’d get breast cancer, so she went for it.

Tuesday, Dr. Julie Gralow, director of breast medical oncology at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance spoke with KUOW's Sara Lerner.  Dr. Gralow says, “The majority of breast cancer in the United States is not gene-mutation cancer.”

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Local Icons
1:43 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Space Needle Was Once Considered A Monstrosity By Architecture Critics

Knute Berger at his writer's table in the Space Needle.
Credit Tom Reese Photography

Interview with Knute Berger at the base of the Space Needle.

Correction: The original broadcast of this story dated Knute Berger’s year in residence at the Space Needle as 2012. In fact, it was most of 2011.

Seattle's Space Needle turned 50 years old last year. It was built for the 1962 World’s Fair. The public loved it immediately. But the architectural critics of the time were much less enthusiastic. They called it a monstrosity. They called it pretentious. They called it vulgar.
 

Knute Berger spent much of 2011 sitting at a table in the Space Needle where he worked as its writer in residence. His private area was roped off by those dividers they use to line people up at the movie theater. Sometimes tourists would stop and ogle him, as if he were an exhibit.

Knute sympathizes with those tourists. He’s loved the Space Needle since he first saw it under construction in 1961. He tells us why the critics hated it so much, and how they gradually came to accept it for what it was: an experiment with new materials and an unlikely symbol of optimism from an age when people were building bomb shelters in fear of a Soviet nuclear attack.

Knute Berger is the author of "Space Needle: The Spirit Of Seattle." He and other journalists gather to review the news of the week every Friday at 10:00 a.m. on KUOW.

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, May 14:

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Sobriety Checkpoints
9:36 am
Mon May 13, 2013

The Constitutional Question Of Sobriety Checkpoints In Washington State

Flickr Photo/Greg Matthews

Correction: The broadcast version of this story states that the Fourth Amendment protects against illegal search and seizure, when in fact it protects against unreasonable search and seizure. 

Washington’s lawmakers are debating new penalties for driving under the influence during a special legislative session beginning Monday.

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Final Decision Expected Soon
2:52 pm
Mon April 29, 2013

NBA Panel: Kings Should Stay In Sacramento

Sacramento Kings fan Gloria Bailey holds a sign campaigning to keep the team in Sacramento, Calif., as she stands in line before an NBA basketball game between the Kings and the Los Angeles Clippers, Wednesday, April 17, 2013.
AP Photo/Steve Yeater

Correction: An earlier version of this story inaccurately said the NBA’s Relocation Committee is made up 12 owners, including Clay Bennett. The committee is made up of seven members and includes Clay Bennett.

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Program Methods Questioned
8:56 am
Fri April 19, 2013

Army Surgeon General Suspends Trust Enhancement Program Following Investigation

Program’s Director, Claudette Elliott. Investigators claim Elliott encouraged employees to participate in what were deemed to be questionable practices, including the unauthorized use of Wiccan rituals and energy readings.
Courtesy/LinkedIn

  

Correction: An earlier version of this story misspelled the name of the program director, Claudette Elliott.

The Army has suspended the Trust and Enhancement Sustainment Task Force, a program that was created to help improve patient care by building on trust. Documents from the investigation obtained by KUOW show that investigators found the task force lacked the structure and employee training standards needed to execute its mission.

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Museum Quality Memorabilia
9:27 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Cracking Open The Sonics’ Treasure Chest

MOHAI Registrar Kristin Halunen and Executive Director Leonard Garfield with a Sonics' 1978-79 championship banner
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

    

Correction: audio for this story differs from its original broadcast, which incorrectly identified Nate McMillan as a member of the Sonics championship team from 1979. We have also clarified the story to indicate that the two conference trophies in MOHAI's warehouse are not the only two won by the Sonics.

When the owners of the Seattle Sonics moved the team to Oklahoma City in 2008, basketball fans in Seattle were crushed. But they got one consolation prize: The team’s owners agreed to leave behind the Sonics’ cache of memorabilia.

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Preserving Historic Buildings
7:18 am
Mon January 14, 2013

Old Buildings May Be On Chopping Block In South Lake Union

Mid-century low-rise office building slated for redevelopment
Deborah Wang?KUOW

Correction: An earlier version of the story stated that buildings cannot be nominated for landmark status if they are too small. The story has been corrected to say that while small buildings can be nominated, they do not automatically trigger a landmark review.

South Lake Union in Seattle was once home to timber mills, commercial laundries, warehouses, even a factory making Ford Model Ts. It’s now being targeted for major new development, with the city’s mayor proposing raising building heights dramatically in the low-rise district. But historic preservationists say the plan does not adequately address the area's unique history and they worry it will result in the obliteration of many of the old buildings that provide the city’s connection with the past.  

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Economy And Politics
9:00 am
Wed January 2, 2013

Congress Reaches A Deal On Fiscal Cliff

The House voted 257-167 late last night to pass the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012. The bill now goes to the President, but sets up another confrontation over taxes and spending in just weeks. We check in with Jill Jackson of CBS News and hear from Representative Jim McDermott about why he voted against the deal.

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