conservation

Conservation
12:28 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Should We Close Part Of The Ocean To Keep Fish On The Plate?

A tuna fishing boat drags a cage of nets on the Mediterranean sea in 2010. (The Mediterranean is not considered to be part of the "high seas.")
Andreas Solaro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 2:55 pm

For lovers of fatty tuna belly, canned albacore and swordfish kebabs, here's a question: Would you be willing to give them up for several years so that you could eat them perhaps for the rest of your life?

If a new proposal to ban fishing on the open ocean were to fly, that's essentially what we might be faced with. It's an idea that might help restore the populations of several rapidly disappearing fish – like tuna, swordfish and marlin — that we, and future generations, might like to continue to have as a food source.

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Bycatch
1:00 pm
Tue January 7, 2014

Whales, Dolphins Are Collateral Damage In Our Taste For Seafood

A sperm whale entangled in a drift net. A report says commercial fisheries around the world kill or injure 650,000 mammals a year.
Alberto Romero Marine Photobank

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 7:29 pm

Hundreds of thousands of marine mammals are injured or killed every year by fishermen around the world. And because most seafood in the U.S. is imported, that means our fish isn't as dolphin-friendly as you might expect.

Under pressure from conservation groups, federal regulators are preparing to tighten import standards to better protect marine mammals.

There was a time, more than 40 years ago, when U.S. fishermen killed millions of dolphins while fishing for tuna. After a public backlash, fishermen figured out how to minimize that so-called bycatch.

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Teanaway Land Purchase
12:28 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

State Buys 38,000 Football Fields Of Land In Teanaway

Flickr Photo/Washington State Department of Natural Resources

 

The Washington State Department of Natural Resources, the Department of Fish and Wildlife and Forterra announced yesterday the purchase of more than 50,000 acres in the headwaters of the Yakima Basin watershed.

It will be designated as the Teanaway Community Forest. That’s big. How big? Think 38,000 football fields. It’s the state’s largest land acquisition in 45 years. Ross Reynolds spoke to Washington State Lands Commissioner Peter Goldmark as he headed from Olympia to Teanaway and asked him about the future of this now state-run land.  

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Nature Conservancy
9:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Violence In Egypt, PacMed Building And Peter Kareiva

Flickr Photo/Madison Guy

Violence Erupts In Egypt
Egyptian troops moved into Cairo to break up the anti-government protests today. The country has declared a state of emergency as violence escalates. Kristen Chick is the Cairo correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor. She reports on the latest.   

What's Moving Into The PacMed Building?
Community college classroom space or view apartments? The public agency that owns the Pacific Medical Center atop Beacon Hill decided which one will occupy the art deco former military hospital on Tuesday night. The Pacific Hospital Preservation and Development Authority looked at proposals from Seattle Central Community College and a Miami-based developer. We talk with PHPDA executive director Rosemary Aragon.

Re-Thinking Conservation
For much of its existence The Nature Conservancy has bought acres upon acres of land to protect it from human development. Peter Kareiva, the chief scientist for The Nature Conservancy, believes a different philosophy is needed in order to deal with the “Age of Man.” He explains his conservation ideas and what a new study on climate change and nature can tell us about resilient environments.

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