college

Education
5:22 am
Thu June 19, 2014

Free College For All: Dream, Promise Or Fantasy?

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 7:56 am

"Free" is a word with a powerful appeal. And right now it's being tossed around a lot, followed by another word: "college."

A new nonprofit, Redeeming America's Promise, announced this week that it will seek federal support to make public colleges tuition-free. That effort is inspired by "Hope" and "Promise" programs like the one in Kalamazoo, Mich., which pays up to 100 percent of college tuition at state colleges and universities for graduates of the city's public high schools.

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Ivory Tower
3:26 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

The Documentary That Asks, Is College Worth It?

A lecture hall at Trinity College.
Flickr Photo/Trinity College (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Andrew Rossi, director of a new documentary "Ivory Tower" that asks the question, is a college education worth the skyrocketing cost of tuition?

Rossi, himself a Harvard and Yale graduate, examines the one trillion dollar student debt (now higher than credit card debt), the reasons higher education costs more, and the shake-out out that could take down many smaller liberal arts colleges.

College Ranking
10:45 am
Tue May 20, 2014

Is This Any Way To Pick A College?

This dog went to a top-ten college...for dogs.
Martha T Flickr

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 12:31 pm

There are more than 7,000 colleges in the U.S., and 21.8 million students enrolled in them. That's potentially 21.8 million opinions about what makes a school "the best."

The penalty for a bad choice can be huge. The cost of a degree continues to soar, graduation rates vary widely from college to college, and a growing body of evidence suggests that picking a supposedly "top" school doesn't necessarily pay off later in life.

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Commencement
1:00 pm
Wed May 14, 2014

As More Speakers Get The Boot, Who's Left To Send Off Graduates?

Several high-profile commencement speakers have resigned in the wake of student protests this graduation season.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 4:59 pm

Graduation Season? More like Disinvitation Season.

As students across the country prepare for pomp and circumstance, college and university administrators are grappling with a series of commencement speech boondoggles.

This year alone, nearly a dozen big-name commencement speakers — including the head of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice — have been invited to speak at graduation ceremonies, only to withdraw or have their invitations rescinded in the wake of campus protests.

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Sexual Abuse
10:33 am
Thu May 1, 2014

55 Colleges, Universities Under Investigation For Abuse Claims

People tour the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., in 2012. Harvard was one of 55 institutions on the Education Department's newly released list.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 1:26 pm

The Department of Education has released a list of 55 colleges and universities facing investigation under Title IX for their handling of sexual abuse claims.

Releasing the list is described as an unprecedented move. NPR's Brian Naylor says the list "starts at Arizona State University and ends at the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine."

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Financial Planning
9:37 am
Tue March 25, 2014

Some Common Misconceptions About Paying For College

iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 9:24 am

In reporting on students navigating the maze of college costs and financial aid, I kept running into misconceptions about paying for a degree. Here are some of the most common ones:

Low-income students get most of their college financial aid needs met and rich kids don't have to worry, so it's mainly the middle class that gets squeezed.

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College Entrance Exams
9:38 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Optional Essay And Other Changes Coming To The SAT

They'll need new prep books.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 4:43 pm

  • NPR's Claudio Sanchez Discusses The College Board Announcement On 'All Things Considered'

The essay is optional. Scores will return to 1,600. And there will be no penalties if you answer something incorrectly. Those are the big takeaways from the SAT changes announced Wednesday.

The College Board said the revisions, the first updates to the college entrance exam since 2005, will take effect in 2016.

Other changes announced: Certain vocabulary words will be dropped in favor of those more commonly used in school and at work, and test-takers will have the option to take the SAT on a computer.

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Greek Life
3:34 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

How Fraternities Came To Be So Dangerous And Powerful

Greek Row at the University of Washington.
Flickr Photo/albedo20 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with journalist Caitlin Flanagan about her Atlantic Magazine cover story, "The Dark Power of Fraternities."

Flanagan said the fraternity industry is the largest provider of alcohol to underage drinkers in the United States outside of family members.

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Kal Penn Interview
10:29 am
Thu June 6, 2013

Actor Kal Penn: From Kumar To Cultural Diplomat

Kal Penn in the KUOW green room.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Kal Penn is best known for his stoner role as Kumar in the "Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle” films. But Penn is also a former member of President Obama’s administration, where he worked on youth, art, and Asian American outreach.      

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College Goals
12:00 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Who Needs A Ph.D. When You Can Get A "Mrs." Degree?

What degree are you striving for?
Flickr Photo/Joe Shlabotnik

Recently, Princeton alum Susan Patton prompted a heated discussion when she urged women at the Ivy League school to find a husband before graduating. She argued that men regularly marry women who are younger, less intelligent and less educated. Patton thinks Princeton women should marry a man who is their intellectual equal. What do you think about the "Mrs." degree? Ross Reynolds talks with listeners about the poorly received push for a "Mrs." degree.

College Tuition
11:11 am
Thu February 28, 2013

Paying For College Without Going Broke

Peter Patau shares this photo from a University of Wisconsin, Madison, football game in 1979. He writes, 'Resident undergrad tuition and fees at UW-Madison were $769 for the 1979-80 academic year; [in 2012] they total $9,665.'
Flickr Photo/Peter Patau

The average cost of a four-year public college shot up 6 percent last year to over $17,000 a year on average. Private colleges are up to over $35,000 a year (beer and togas not included.) So how do parents pay for college these days without going broke? Ross Reynolds talks with Kalman Chany, author of "Paying for College Without Going Broke," about the GET program and other ways to fund your child's higher education.

Higher Education
3:50 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Online Learning: Crediting The Classes

The crushing cost of student debt is leading schools, students and parents to look at alternatives provided by online learning. A leader in the field, Karen Symms Gallagher, dean of the University of Southern California Rossier School of Education, sits down with Ross Reynolds for a discussion about the future of online learning for credit.