climate change

Climate Change
9:53 am
Wed September 25, 2013

Washington’s Top Firms Silent On Climate Risks Despite SEC Rule

The SEC requires publicly traded companies to disclose their financial risks to investors.
Wikimedia Commons

If you own stocks or have money in a retirement plan, your money may be more at risk than you’re being told.

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Environment
3:33 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

The Danger Of Rising Carbon Dioxide In The World's Oceans

Fabricius records data from instruments placed alongside corals in the CO2 vents off Dobu Island.
Credit The Seattle Times Photo/Steve Ringman

Rising levels of carbon dioxide are corroding the world's seas. It’s called ocean acidification, and it’s already threatening Northwest oyster beds.

Scientists think the impact of ocean acidification is happening much more rapidly than previously thought.

The Seattle Times has published a major print and online series on its impacts called "Sea Change: The Pacific’s Perilous Turn" by reporter Craig Welch and photographer Steve Ringman. Craig Welch talks with Ross Reynolds.

Science
6:55 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Forecasting The Changing Ocean Conditions

Flickr Photo/Wizetux

We take for granted the fact that we can predict long-term weather forecasts. Now scientists at the University of Washington are working on ways to forecast the changing conditions of the ocean. They hope these forecasts can help them better understand how those conditions affect Northwest fisheries. 

Samantha Siedlecki is a research scientist at the University of Washington Joint Institute of the Study of Atmosphere and Ocean; she helped develop the forecasting tools and explains the way they work.

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Environment Research
10:07 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Scientists Look For Climate Change Clues In Wildfire Soot

Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:10 pm

You may know that on a hot, sunny day it’s better to be sitting in a white car than a black one. White reflects sunlight, while black absorbs more of it.

The same concept applies to researchers trying to figure out what effect wildfires have on climate change. And part of the answer is whether the smoke particles are dark or reflective.

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Researching Amphibians
11:01 am
Wed August 7, 2013

Tracking An Alpine Frog That Chuckles And Beeps For Climate Change Research

The Cascades frog is only found in the alpine wetlands of the Pacific Northwest, though its range used to extend down to Northern California and up to British Columbia. Scientists are concerned its range will continue to shrink with climate change.
EarthFix Photo/Ashley Ahearn

Maureen Ryan scales rocky trails at 5,000 feet elevation as nimbly as the mountain goats that wandered through camp earlier this morning.

The researcher of amphibians leads her team of scientists down off a ridge line in the Seven Lakes Basin of Olympic National Park to her “lab,” you might call it. It’s a series of pothole wetlands cupped in the folds of these green, snow-studded mountains: a perfect habitat for Cascades frogs (Rana cascadae).

Ryan, a researcher with the University of Washington, is an expert on alpine amphibians. She’s also part of a group of scientists from around the region, coordinated by the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative at the USGS, who are trying to understand and project how the warming climate will affect these frogs’ ability to feed, mate, and ultimately, survive.

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Climate Change
9:00 am
Tue August 6, 2013

MLB Suspensions, Technology And Sexuality, And William Ruckelsaus

Flickr Photo/Alex Abian

MLB Suspensions
Major League Baseball has handed down lengthy suspensions to more than a dozen players for using performance enhancing drugs, among them: former Seattle Mariner (and current New York Yankee) Alex Rodriguez. He was suspended for the remainder of this season and all of next season. A player in the Mariners’ minor league system was also suspended: Tacoma Rainiers catcher Jesus Montero. What do these suspensions say about the state of drug use in baseball?

Technology-Enabled Sexual Landscape
Technology has changed when and how kids are exposed to sexual activity.  Gone are the dirty magazines under the mattress.  On average, kids are exposed to full action, hardcore sexual activity by age 10.  How is this changing the behavior and expectations of teenagers?  How can you help your kids navigate a technology-enabled sexual landscape?

Climate Change And The Republican Party  
Former head of the Environmental Protection Agency and former co-chair of the Puget Sound Partnership, William Ruckelsaus explains why the Republican Party needs to take action on climate change.

The Weather and Hike of the Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.
 

Environmental Issues
8:00 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Climate Change, Coal And The Pacific Northwest With Bill McKibben

Bill Kibben's book "The End of Nature"

In 1989, Bill McKibben wrote what is considered the first book on climate change for a general audience. More than two decades after “The End of Nature,” McKibben is still advocating for the environment. He’s been a main player in the fight to stop the Keystone Pipeline and he focuses this talk on climate change and the Northwest.

He spoke at the Queen Anne United Methodist Church on April 28 as part of The Well lecture series.

Climate Change
9:24 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Field Test Near Pasco Renews Attention On Viability Of Carbon Storage

Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 8:34 am

The viability of carbon capture and storage can spark lively debate among climate scientists, activists and industry. This week, technicians in southeast Washington continue a field test to show how carbon dioxide could be injected and trapped deep underground.

It's an experiment led by the Pacific Northwest National Lab. Injection of fifty tanker truck loads of CO2 will take about four weeks. Then comes about a year and a half of monitoring to see if the global warming gas stays locked away forever beneath ancient lava flows.

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Environment And Business
8:00 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Environmental Debt With Amy Larkin

How can business and the natural world successfully coexist?
Flickr Photo/rlpporch

Environmental debt — global warming, extreme weather, pollution — is weakening the global economy. Amy Larkin, formerly of Greenpeace, discusses how the natural world and business can coexist. She spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on July 1.

Climate Change
1:15 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Song For A Warming Planet

McCarty Glacier, Alaska. Left: July 30, 1909. Right: August 11, 2004.
Credit NASA

As a student at University of Minnesota, Daniel Crawford was exposed to the latest science on climate change. He learned that the planet was warming rapidly. Scientists have struggled to communicate the gravity of that discovery with others, and so, as a planet we've failed to make changes that would slow the warming trend.

But Daniel has a tool unavailable to most scientists. He plays the cello. By translating NASA's collection of historic temperature data into notes, he tells the story of Earth's climate change with a song. It's an unpleasant song. But it's also a song whose melody can't be easily forgotten.

Full list of stories on KUOW Presents, July 10:

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Fire Season Northwest
9:49 am
Tue July 2, 2013

19 Firefighter Deaths Send Chill Through Northwest As Heat Wave Strikes

National Interagency Fire Center

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 4:53 pm

The loss of 19 firefighters in Arizona is sending a chill through the firefighting community in the Northwest. Fire season is about to begin here -- ushered in by a heat wave sweeping the region.

Word spread fast among wildland firefighters in the Northwest. “We are saddened but [must] honor our fallen by continuing with the job at hand,” wrote the hotshot crew out of Union, Ore., on Facebook.

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Mass Extinction
8:00 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Surviving Earth's Next Major Disaster With Annalee Newitz

Annalee Newitz's book "Scatter, Adapt, and Remember."

We’re long overdue for a catastrophic disaster based on studies of Earth’s past. Scary? It probably should be, considering that during our most recent disasters, more than 75 percent of the planet’s species died out. 

Annalee Newitz is a journalist and editor of the science website i09.com. She’s also the author of “Scatter, Adapt, and Remember: How Humans Will Survive a Mass Extinction.” Annalee Newitz talks about how, even though catastrophe may be inevitable, humanity's chances for survival are better now than ever. She spoke at Seattle’s Town Hall on May 22.

Puget Sound Energy
5:41 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Washington’s Largest Coal User Unfazed by Obama’s Climate Plan

President Barack Obama wipes his face as he speaks about climate change, Tuesday, June 25, 2013, at Georgetown University in Washington.
AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

President Barack Obama’s wide-ranging plan for action on climate change, announced Tuesday at Georgetown University, includes regulating carbon emissions from existing coal-burning power plants for the first time. In the Pacific Northwest, relatively little coal is used, but one of the region’s biggest coal consumers is sticking with its plans to keep relying on the dirtiest of all fossil fuels.

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Obama's Climate Change Stance
12:10 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Obama Announces Action On Climate Change

  Today, President Barack Obama announced he's taking aim at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. He also said he'll only support the controversial Keystone XL pipeline if it doesn't lead to a net increase in greenhouse gas emissions. David Roberts writes about energy policy for the environmental magazine Grist. He talked with David Hyde.

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Future Of Wine Production
10:25 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Scientist: Climate Change Unlikely To Seriously Affect Northwest Wine

Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Mon June 24, 2013 3:17 pm

The Northwest is well positioned to make wine into the future despite global climate change. So says a scientist who presented his findings on climate change and wine at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash. Monday.

Wine grape vines can be productive for decades. But how will climate change affect that? That’s the question Antonio Busalacchi, with the University of Maryland, sought to answer.

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