climate change

Flickr Photo/Erich Ferdinand (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Is Seattle going too far by making composting mandatory? Is the Northwest the best place to be in a changing climate? Is Hope Solo distracting you from the real domestic violence problem?

Bill Radke discusses these stories plus torn-up pot tickets, washed-up Mariners (maybe) and glitchy ferry clickers with Eli Sanders, Knute Berger, Joni Balter, Luke Burbank, ESPN’s Jim Caple and UW atmospheric scientist Cliff Mass.

Flickr Photo/UN University in Bonn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. Koko Warner, lead author of the adaptation section in the latest UN report on Climate Change, about a new University of Washington study this week that found no evidence that weather patterns in the Northwest so far have been influenced by human greenhouse gas emissions.

They also discuss a New York Times story which suggested the Pacific Northwest would be a good place to be when climate change hits because there will be less extreme heat and plentiful water.

According to Warner, if you feel relief with these reports, you are mistaken. Reynolds spoke to her at the UN Climate summit this week.

Earth Ministry's Facebook page

Marcie Sillman speaks with Jessie Dye, outreach director for Earth Ministry, about the 2014 UN Climate Summit and the involvement of religious groups in environmental work.

SEATTLE – Changing wind patterns are the primary cause of warming temperatures in the Northwest, according to a study published Monday.

The authors lined up historical wind data with coastal sea surface temperature in the Northeastern section of the Pacific Ocean since the beginning of the 20th century. They found that up to 90% of the warming in the Pacific Northwest and Northern California is driven by changes in wind patterns.

Kristin Ohlson's book "The Soil Will Save Us."

This week on Speakers Forum we’ll hear from author Kristin Ohlson. Her new book is "The Soil Will Save Us: How Scientists, Farmers, and Foodies Are Healing the Soil to Save the Planet."

In it she sheds light on our understanding of soil and its crucial role in capturing and storing carbon emissions. Ohlson details how changes in how we farm may hold the key to countering global warming.

Ohlson is a freelance journalist and author based in Portland, Ore. She’s written for the New York Times, the Christian Science Monitor, Utne and Salon. Her books include "Stalking the Divine" and "Kabul Beauty School."

Ohlson spoke at The Elliott Bay Book Company on July 28. Thanks to Anna Tatistcheff for this recording. 

A recent study has found that the Northwest’s average annual temperature increased significantly over the last century, and that the shift is most likely caused by greenhouse gas emissions.

The study was published by researchers at the University of Idaho and Oregon State University. It found that the region's average annual temperature has risen by a total of 1.3­ degrees Fahrenheit over the last hundred years.

The study drew together data from 141 weather stations across Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming from the period between 1901 and 2012.

It might seem like fire season is as bad as it's ever been. But there's a group of researchers who question that prevailing wisdom.

SEATTLE -- When Washington Gov. Jay Inslee wanted to show the connection between climate change and an unpleasant and costly consequence for his constituents, he decided to tour a sewage treatment plant.

Inslee's visit Tuesday to the West Point Wastewater Treatment Plant in Seattle's Discovery Park was the latest stop on his statewide tour to raise awareness about the costs of climate change.

Flickr Photo/Washington Department of Natural Resources

Fighting this summer’s wildfires in eastern Washington has cost the state more than $50 million, and Governor Jay Inslee said the state can expect even more expensive fires in years ahead.

The ongoing fires are the “tip of the iceberg," Inslee said, because warmer climate likely means more fires.

John Ryan / KUOW

An independent commission will delve into the deadliest landslide in Washington history. The commission will seek statewide lessons from the Oso landslide, land use in the Oso area before the slide and the emergency response in the days and weeks afterward.

A federal threatened species listing for the wolverine is looking increasingly unlikely.

The survey was conducted for EarthFix by the independent and nonpartisan firm, DHM Research. A representative sampling of 1,200 residents of Washington, Idaho and Oregon participated and 62 percent of them said they consider it an urgent priority for state and local governments to address global warming.

A majority of respondents also registered support for specific proposals to reduce the emission of carbon that contributes to climate change.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. A study published in the journal "Nature Climate Change" says, the population of Emperor penguins in Antarctica is in danger. Hal Caswell is a scientist emeritus at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He co-authored the report. And he joins us from Amsterdam. Welcome.

HAL CASWELL: Thank you.

WERTHEIMER: You've been studying the Emperor penguin population in Antarctica. What's happening to them?

Flickr Photo/University of Denver (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with author Iain McCalman about his new book, “The Reef — A Passionate History: The Great Barrier Reef from Captain Cook to Climate Change.”

new report funded by former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg says climate change is bad for business, with up to $100 billion in coastal real estate underwater by 2050. 

The report projects Seattle's sea level to rise as much as three feet by the end of this century. That’s not because nearby Alaskan glaciers are melting, however. Taken by themselves, those melting Alaskan glaciers could actually cause sea level to drop in the short term.

KUOW's Bill Radke talks with Climate Central scientist Ben Strauss about how that works.

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