civil rights

Bob Santos (right) and Larry Gossett at a 2015 racial equity conference. Both men were part of the so-called "Gang Of Four" group of civil rights activists.
King County

Condolences are pouring in for the family of longtime Seattle civil rights activist Bob Santos, who died Saturday at the age of 82.

In an interview with KUOW last year, Santos explained that he first felt the need for political activism at a very young age. He had his awakening when he was in first grade, in 1942.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a singer who changed the lyrics to the Canadian national anthem to say 'All Lives Matter' at the Major League Baseball All-Star game Tuesday. 


Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9
Flickr Photo/scottlum (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rgPsj9

Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, Laquan McDonald, Walter Scott. 

"These are all shootings that could've been prevented," said Norm Stamper, former chief of the Seattle Police Department.
 

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson looks at nine police-involved deaths.

Eric Garner

July 17, 2014

Staten Island, New York

Eric Garner was approached by police on the sidewalk for illegally selling loose cigarettes. NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo used a chokehold on Garner. A bystander video shows Garner saying “I can’t breathe” 11 times before he died.

A grand jury declined to indict Officer Pantaleo.

Michael Brown

August 9, 2014

Ferguson, Missouri

Dallas police detain a driver after several police officers were shot in downtown Dallas, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Snipers apparently shot police officers during protests and some of the officers are dead, the city's police chief said in a statement.
AP Photo/LM Otero

Bill Radke speaks with civil rights lawyer Connie Rice about how she helped transform the culture of policing from a warrior model to a guardian model at the LAPD, and why she believes such changes are possible elsewhere.

R
Jeffrey Dubinsky/Reuters

America is facing a human rights crisis that must be addressed as a matter of urgency. 

That’s the gist of findings by a United Nations investigation into conditions for African Americans. And they were released back in January, long before the deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge and Philando Castile outside of St. Paul. 

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Seattle’s tax on every gun and bullet sold in the city can stay, a King County Superior Court judge said Tuesday.

Judge Palmer Robinson denied a request by firearms advocates for an injunction against the measure. Approved by the City Council in August, it requires dealers to pay $25 for every gun sold and up to 5 cents for every round of ammunition sold.

In a wide-ranging interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep, President Obama had some advice for college protesters across the country.

Wing Luke's surviving siblings, Ruby Luke (left), Marge Young, and Bettie Luke at Attorney General Bob Ferguson's announcement of the new civil rights investigative unit.
Washington State Office of the Attorney General

The state Attorney General Bob Ferguson likes to say he heads the state’s largest law firm: There are 550 lawyers in 27 divisions. They represent the state on different cases like fraud, labor issues and consumer protection. But he felt something was missing.

Sunset over the Alabama River and the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma.
Flickr Photo/sunsurfr (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to University of Washington communication professor David Domke about the pilgrimage he and 52 fellow travelers took to the deep south. They met with civil rights leaders and visited key monuments in the civil rights movement. The trip culminated in Selma, Alabama on the Edmund Pettus Bridge where President Obama spoke in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday."

Note to our readers: This report contains some strong racial language.

This month Selma, Ala., will mark the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday." That's the day police beat demonstrators attempting to march to Montgomery in support of voting rights. Some of the most iconic images of that day were captured by a white photographer — the late Spider Martin.

Rosa Parks is well-known for her refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on a public bus in Montgomery, Ala., in December 1955. But Parks' civil rights protest did have a precedent: Fifteen-year-old Claudette Colvin, a student from a black high school in Montgomery, had refused to move from her bus seat nine months earlier. However, Colvin is not nearly as well-known, and certainly not as celebrated, as Parks.

For decades, a graphic letter sent from J. Edgar Hoover's FBI to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was thought to only exist in a censored form. The letter focused on King's sex life and his extramarital affairs. Yale historian Beverly Gage, who's working on a biography of Hoover, recently uncovered an unredacted version of the letter at the National Archives. It begins:

"King,

Bans on same-sex marriage in Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee were confirmed by a federal court Thursday, in a ruling that provides yet another shift in the legal fight over the issue.

The 2-1 decision handed down by the Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit comes after the four states had argued this summer that their voters had the authority to decide whether to ban marriage between a same-sex couple.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Munincipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with James Gregory, director of the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project at the University of Washington, about the history of racial exclusion in early 20th century housing covenants.

This segment originally aired May 21, 2014.

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