The computer drives containing sensitive information in a lawsuit against the CIA were taken from an office on the second floor of Smith Hall on the University of Washington campus, police say.
Flickr photo/Cody Logan (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Computer hardware holding sensitive information being used in a lawsuit against the CIA has been stolen, according to the University of Washington’s Center for Human Rights.

WikiLeaks has released a cache of documents that the website says come from the AOL email account of Central Intelligence Agency Director John Brennan.

The documents purportedly include Brennan's security clearance application with personal information as well as the names, addresses and telephone numbers of many of his acquaintances, including high-profile ones like former CIA Director George Tenet. In another document, Brennan appears to give advice on how to deal with Iran to the incoming Obama administration.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee says he would apply a "broad" interpretation to the term “law enforcement” when issuing fictitious driver licenses to undercover agents. The governor’s comment follows our report that the CIA has obtained nearly 300 so-called confidential Washington driver licenses since 2007.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – The Washington House has voted to allow the Department of Licensing to continue to issue fictitious driver licenses to undercover police officers. But with new safeguards. Even so, the vote Tuesday came over the objections of some Republicans.

The Department of Licensing has issued so-called confidential driver licenses for decades. But it never had direct authorization from the legislature to do so. The program is supposed to be for law enforcement officers.

Editor's note: This story does not contain any identifying details of undercover officers from law enforcement agencies or agents of the Central Intelligence Agency. Instead, it includes aggregate numbers of confidential licenses issued by the state of Washington to local, state and federal agencies. This is consistent with what the Washington Department of Licensing has proposed to release under pending legislation in Olympia.

Petty Officer 2nd Class Kilho Park, DVIDSHUB / Flickr

When Barack Obama became president he announced a ban on torture and an end to the CIA’s secret prison network.  But how exactly is the Obama administration handling terrorism suspects detained abroad?  And what’s the difference from the Bush administration?

Ross Reynolds talks with American University law professor, Stephen Vladeck, about how the two administrations compare when it comes to the issue of rendition.