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Software giant Microsoft had several chances Wednesday to impress Chinese leaders with the company's vision of a "free and open" Internet.

Why Did China's President Visit Seattle First?

Sep 23, 2015
Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015, at a banquet in Seattle.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

David Hyde speaks with David Bachman, a professor of international studies at the University of Washington, about why Seattle was Chinese President Xi Jinping's first stop on this trip to the U.S.

Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.
Flickr Photo/Ryan Raffa (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1iMN9iL

Ross Reynolds talks to Emily Parkhurst, an editor for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the University of Washington's new deal with Tsinghua University in Beijing to study clean energy technology.

Demonstrator Alice Tsai takes a photo of the police blocking her group from accessing the Westin Hotel, where Chinese President Xi Jinping is staying.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Protesters have been trying to get so close to Chinese President Xi Jinping in Seattle that he can hear their chants. But they’re having a hard time.

People form a greeting line as Chinese President Xi Jinping and his wife step out of a Boeing 747 at Everett's Paine Field.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The tech and business leaders meeting with President Xi Jinping in Seattle this week know a lot about doing business in China — the risks as well as the opportunities.

Solar company REC Silicon Tuesday warned of big layoffs at a factory in central Washington if a trade dispute between the U.S. and China drags on much longer.

Sunlight Toy Factory, Tangxia, China taken in 2010.
Flickr Photo/Chris (CC BY NC)/http://bit.ly/1Qx0eXC

David Hyde speaks with University of Washington philosophy professor Michael Blake about the moral responsibilities of business leaders who meet with China's President Xi Jinping during his visit to Seattle.

Flag of Tibet.
Flickr Photo/Ed Uthman (CC BY SA)/http://bit.ly/1KyCe1Q

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Jampa Jorkhang, incoming president of the Tibetan Association of Washington, to discuss why the Tibetan community is protesting Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit.

Ross Reynolds talks with Marketplace China correspondent Rob Schmitz about why President Xi Jinping is putting meetings with tech and business leaders in Seattle ahead of a trip to the White House.

Washington’s second largest industry, agriculture, is looking for a place at the negotiation table Tuesday with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

The governors of Oregon and Washington will be among a contingent in discussion with the president of China as he kicks off his state visit in the Pacific Northwest Tuesday.

Ross Reynolds talks to Porter Erisman, a former vice president at Alibaba -- the biggest e-commerce site on the Web -- about his new book, "Alibaba's World: How A Remarkable Chinese Company is Changing the Face of Global Business."

Chinese President Xi Jinping visits Bali, Indonesia for the 2013  Applied Power Electronics Conference.
Flickr Photo/APEC 2013 (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1LJ6asV

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Todd Bishop, co-founder and editor of technology news site GeekWire, about why Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to Seattle is putting U.S. tech leaders on the spot. Bishop wrote a FAQ on President Xi's visit for GeekWire.

Former U.S. Ambassador to China Gary Locke in 2012.
Flickr Photo/Linda Cotton (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1PltfoZ

 

David Hyde speaks with Gary Locke, former U.S. ambassador to China and former Washington governor, about Chinese President Xi Jinping's visit to Washington state this week.

China President Xi Jinping.
Flickr Photo/Global Panorama (Michel Temer) (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Oq11MA

The Chinese President Xi Jinping will be in Seattle Tuesday. It’s the first stop on his U.S. itinerary. KUOW’s Liz Jones visited Seattle’s Chinatown neighborhood to see what they think of this high-profile visitor.

Chinese President Xi Jinping will meet with titans of Northwest commerce Tuesday and Wednesday on their home turf: Think Boeing, Starbucks, Microsoft and Amazon.

Seattle Aquarium veterinarian Lesanna Lahner checks Mishka's fur after the otter was transferred from Seward, Alaska in February 2015.
KUOW Photo/Sara Lerner

Did the Seattle teachers strike change the conversation about public education? Why is China’s president stopping in Seattle on his way to D.C.? And why does a sea otter at the aquarium need an inhaler?

Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter, Paul Guppy of the Washington Policy Center and former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Lincoln High School principal Patrick Erwin about the upcoming visit of Chinese President Xi Jinping.

Chinese President Xi Jinping will make a state visit to the U.S. next week. The first item on the itinerary is a two-day stopover in western Washington.

China President Xi Jinping.
Flickr Photo/Global Panorama (Michel Temer) (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Oq11MA

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jon Talton about the economic connections between Washington state and China, and how they might play out in Chinese President Xi Jinping's upcoming visit.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle has become the latest landing place for a wave of Chinese investments – much of it coming through a controversial investor visa program called EB-5.

EB-5 is bringing construction money and jobs to the Seattle economy. But it may also have brought spies, fraudsters and absconders to our region. Now the fate of the program is just as murky, as it could expire at the end of the month.

Washington Lt. Governor Brad Owen traveled to China last year and touted a company that’s now at the center of a federal fraud investigation.

For the second-straight day, China has allowed its currency to take a sharp drop, sparking another round of falling stock prices internationally. The decision to devalue the yuan has shaken investors who fear a currency war and question the health of China's economy, the second-largest in the world.

A mega-economic story is playing out globally. It involves U.S. interest rates, the Chinese stock market and jobs in Minnesota, Arizona and North Dakota.

And your wallet, too.

No kidding. It's all related. To see how, let your mind wander back.

USA flag, China flag
Flickr Photo/USDA (CC BY 2.0)

David Hyde speaks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for the Seattle Times, about the recent volatility in the Chinese stock markets and what that means for Washington state. 

LA County Parks and Recreation

What started out as a relatively simple case of high school bullying escalated quickly to what prosecutors describe as torture, kidnapping and assault.

On March 30, 18-year-old Yiran "Camellia" Liu was the victim of a violent attack in the Los Angeles suburb of Rowland Heights.

Liu testified last week at a preliminary hearing that Yunyao "Helen" Zhai, Yuhan "Coco" Yang and Xinlei "John" Zhang took her to Rowland Heights Park, where they stripped her naked, kicked her,  slapped her hundreds of times and burned her nipples with cigarettes.

The motive for the attack?

Former Secretary of the Treasury Henry M. Paulson, Jr. speaks during the U.S. Naval War College 2015 Current Strategy Forum in Newport, Rhode Island on June 17.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Naval War College (CC BY 2.0)

People tend to have strong opinions about Henry “Hank” Paulson. Depending on your point of view, he either saved the U.S. economy as we know it or allowed it to be brought to its knees in the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

Scientists and crew prepping the Healy for a voyage to the North Pole
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

The Shell Oil rig that left Elliott Bay last week isn't the only big vessel heading to the Arctic from Seattle. A Coast Guard icebreaker heads to Alaska on Wednesday. The Seattle-based ship will help a multinational team of scientists explore pollution at the North Pole.

Climate change has fueled competition at the top of the world, where shipping and resource extraction are becoming feasible for the first time. With a tiny fleet of icebreakers (the Coast Guard has just two in operation), the U.S. lags behind other nations. At last count, Russia has 41 icebreakers.

KUOW's John Ryan reports.

Last month, a Chinese government think tank bashed history professors from Harvard, Georgetown and other leading American universities regarding things they wrote — at least 15 years ago — about events that occurred more than two centuries ago.

"This was a uniquely vitriolic attack," says Georgetown's Jim Millward. The article calls him as "arrogant," "overbearing" and an "imperialist," and dismisses Millward's and his colleagues' scholarship as "academically absurd."

"Ugly Americans" — tourists with appalling manners, loud voices, louder apparel and heaps of cultural insensitivity — have been an enduring stereotype for decades.

They are now facing a major challenge from their increasingly well-traveled Chinese counterparts.

Not only are the Chinese bemoaning their rudeness at home and abroad, the government has responded with new rules that took effect this week, aimed at keeping loutish travelers in check.

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