child care

About 7 million Americans work part-time jobs because their hours were cut back or they can’t find full time work, according to a new survey from the website CareerBuilder.

Many people work multiple part-time jobs, some with odd hours. With that, there has been growing demand for what some call “extreme” day care — centers that are open sometimes 24 hours a day, with kids spending the night or being dropped off or picked up after midnight.

Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC BY-NC-ND)

Seattle voters will see two competing child care initiatives on their fall ballots.

A proposal from the mayor and City Council would create a subsidized preschool program for 3- and 4-year-olds.

Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The backers of an initiative to increase pay and training for child care workers in Seattle have filed suit against the city for the way the measure will appear on the fall ballot.

KUOW’s Ann Dornfeld reports.

Ann Dornfeld / KUOW

Patti Oliver Bailey sat on a sunny wooden deck in Seattle’s Rainier Valley on a recent afternoon, surrounded by toddlers digging through a box of pink sand and bright toys.

Flickr Photo/a.pasquier

The Seattle City Council voted on Monday to send two competing early childhood education initiatives to voters this fall. One initiative was proposed by council President Tim Burgess and Mayor Ed Murray, and the other by a union that represents child care workers.

Benefit Corporations Look Beyond The Profit Motive

Jun 18, 2014

A corporation has one core obligation: to make money. But some companies are signing a deal, promising to create not only profit but also a tangible benefit to society and the environment. They're called benefit corporations, and their movement has caught the ear of lawmakers across the country.

In the tiny town of Gilsum, N.H., you'll find the headquarters of W.S. Badger Co. Inc. The company makes all-natural cosmetics marketed under the name Badger Balm. When CEO Bill Whyte founded the company two decades ago, the staff was lean.

US Daycares Fail To Make The Grade

Jul 1, 2013
Flickr Photo/U.S. Army

  About 8.2 million kids under five in the United States spend at least part of their week in the care of someone other than a parent. And that number is even higher in the summer. Of those child care operations, the majority are rated “fair” or “poor” quality  according to a 2007 study by the National Institute of Child Health Development.

Washington state however is one of the all-stars. The state was ranked number three in the nation for quality of child care center requirements and oversight in a 2013 study by the non-profit resource organization Child Care Aware. Ross Reynolds talks to Elizabeth Bonbright, the director of Child Care Aware of Washington, about why she says that’s still nothing to write home about.