capital punishment

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's a little-noticed fact about the death penalty. We've heard a big debate about how to execute people - lethal injection, electric chair, firing squad. That debate obscures a little-noticed fact - the number of people executed by any method is way down in the United States in recent years. NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has been covering this story. She's in our studios. Hi, Carrie.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: How far down?

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Ross Reynolds talks with Kitsap County Prosecutor Russ Hauge on his support for the death penalty.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File

Ross Reynolds talks with Eldon Vail, former Washington Department of Corrections Secretary, about why he supports Governor Jay Inslee's decision to suspend the death penalty.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File

Governor Jay Inslee puts a halt to executions and initiates a debate about the future of capital punishment in Washington state. Meanwhile, state transportation officials continue to explore the cost overruns as repairs to Bertha are expected to take months. And the housing community reviews Seattle's affordability issue.

Steve Scher talks with Crosscut’s Knute Berger, Eli Sanders of The Stranger and news analyst Joni Balter about this week's top stories.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Governor Jay Inslee’s announcement of a de facto moratorium on the death penalty on Tuesday has been making waves through the state.

Jay Inslee's Facebook page.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee issued a moratorium Tuesday on the use of the death penalty in Washington state during his term.

Washington Department of Corrections

  A House committee in Olympia will hear public testimony Wednesday for a bill that would abolish capital punishment in Washington. House Bill 1504 would eliminate the death penalty in favor of life without parole.