campaign finance | KUOW News and Information

campaign finance

When Bernie Sanders took the stage Sunday night in Madison, Wis., the crowd of about 5,000 went wild. One of the biggest applause lines came when Sanders talked about his campaign taking on the establishment.

"These guys may have unlimited sums of money," the Vermont senator said. "They may control the media, they may control the economy, they may control the political system. But when millions of people stand up together united and demand change, we will not be stopped."

Washington lawmakers are meeting at the state Capitol this week to get ready for the 2016 legislative session. If lawmakers are back in town, that means lobbyists are too. So why squander the moment?

A supporter of Initiative 122 displays a carved pumpkin.
Facebook Photo/Honest Elections Seattle

David Hyde talks with Honest Elections campaign manager Brianna Thomas about the passage of  Initiative 122. 

Washington anti-tax activist Tim Eyman could face civil or even criminal sanctions for alleged campaign finance violations.

Washington anti-tax activist Tim Eyman is in trouble again with the state’s Public Disclosure Commission. A lengthy investigative report released Monday alleges Eyman received a series of unreported payments.

Marcie Sillman talks with state Rep. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, about his push for more transparency in government.

Also, Ross Reynolds gets the scoop on various transparency bills in the legislature from KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Washington political science professor Mark Smith about "dark money" and how that fits into campaign financing. 

The most expensive race in Washington state politics keeps getting pricier: $53 a vote as of noon Monday.

Washington state has strict campaign contribution limits. But candidates and political donors are experts at finding ways around those caps.

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with New York Times reporter Eric Lipton about the influence of lobbyists on attorneys general. Reynolds also gets a response from Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson.

KUOW/Kara McDermott

With control of the Washington state Senate up for grabs, millions of dollars are pouring into key legislative races around the state. One race on Seattle’s Eastside has attracted more cash than any other: Republican state Senator Andy Hill versus Democratic challenger Matt Isenhower.

Oregon’s ballot measure campaigns are continuing to pull in big-money donations.

Environmentalists, unions, trial lawyers and business interests may be among the top political spenders in Washington this election year, but there’s a group of influential players who don’t necessarily show up in the campaign finance reports.

The Washington Education Association has taken in $1.5 million this year, making it the head of the pack when it comes to money raised by political action committees.

The 2014 election is about six weeks away. That means campaigns are kicking into high gear and asking their funders to help them cross the finish line.

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