campaign finance

Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff, King County Executive Dow Constantine and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray at Capitol Hill’s light rail station.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

If you see an ad pushing the Sound Transit 3 ballot measure anytime soon, odds are it will have been paid for by a group that stands to make millions of dollars from ST3’s passage.

Joe McDermott
Flickr Photo/Ronald Woan (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/cuoczq

In the race to replace retiring U.S. Representative Jim McDermott, campaign finance is top of mind. Nine candidates are running for the Seattle-area House position.

Among them, Joe McDermott has signed a pledge denouncing certain political donations, and he's asking opponents to do the same.


After months of bashing the Republican National Committee and big fundraisers, Donald Trump is getting on board.

"These are highly sophisticated killers, and when they give $5 million, or $2 million or $1 million to Jeb [Bush], they have him just like a puppet," Trump said at the Iowa State Fair last year. "He'll do whatever they want. He is their puppet."

But now the de facto GOP nominee has inked two joint fundraising agreements with the RNC and 11 state parties on Tuesday to start taking in enormous checks from big donors.

Nestle, the company aiming to build a bottled water plant in Cascade Locks, has funded a political action committee supporting its cause, according to campaign finance data.

Hood River County voters will decide on a measure aimed at blocking the plant’s construction in Oregon’s May 17 primary election. The ballot measure would restrict the production and transportation of bottled water to less than 1,000 gallons per day from any Hood River County water source.

When Bernie Sanders took the stage Sunday night in Madison, Wis., the crowd of about 5,000 went wild. One of the biggest applause lines came when Sanders talked about his campaign taking on the establishment.

"These guys may have unlimited sums of money," the Vermont senator said. "They may control the media, they may control the economy, they may control the political system. But when millions of people stand up together united and demand change, we will not be stopped."

Washington lawmakers are meeting at the state Capitol this week to get ready for the 2016 legislative session. If lawmakers are back in town, that means lobbyists are too. So why squander the moment?

A supporter of Initiative 122 displays a carved pumpkin.
Facebook Photo/Honest Elections Seattle

David Hyde talks with Honest Elections campaign manager Brianna Thomas about the passage of  Initiative 122. 

Washington anti-tax activist Tim Eyman could face civil or even criminal sanctions for alleged campaign finance violations.

Washington anti-tax activist Tim Eyman is in trouble again with the state’s Public Disclosure Commission. A lengthy investigative report released Monday alleges Eyman received a series of unreported payments.

Marcie Sillman talks with state Rep. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, about his push for more transparency in government.

Also, Ross Reynolds gets the scoop on various transparency bills in the legislature from KUOW's Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with University of Washington political science professor Mark Smith about "dark money" and how that fits into campaign financing. 

The most expensive race in Washington state politics keeps getting pricier: $53 a vote as of noon Monday.

Washington state has strict campaign contribution limits. But candidates and political donors are experts at finding ways around those caps.

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with New York Times reporter Eric Lipton about the influence of lobbyists on attorneys general. Reynolds also gets a response from Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson.

KUOW/Kara McDermott

With control of the Washington state Senate up for grabs, millions of dollars are pouring into key legislative races around the state. One race on Seattle’s Eastside has attracted more cash than any other: Republican state Senator Andy Hill versus Democratic challenger Matt Isenhower.

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