business

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle’s new minimum wage law went into effect April 1, as did a law meant to ensure workers get paid overtime when they’ve earned it. But not everyone’s complying.

So what’s the city doing to enforce the new laws? 

Four years ago, a train crash in southwest Washington killed two railroad workers and their driver.

Managers Likely To Cancel West Coast Sardine Fishery

Apr 7, 2015

The Pacific Fishery Management Council has yet to make the final call, but initial reports indicate there aren't enough fish to open a sardine fishery on the West Coast this year.

That's bad news for several fishing towns in Oregon and Washington, where the majority of the West Coast sardines were landed in the past several years, and where some processors focus primarily on sardines.

The latest population estimates show sardines have fallen below the 150,000 metric ton cutoff for opening a West Coast fishery.

A rash of new Web domain suffixes has popped up in recent years to supplement .com and .net — terms such as .bargains or .dating.

Several new suffixes seem to invite negative feedback. There are .gripe and .fail. There's even .wtf — a colorful variation on "what the heck." And soon, there will be .sucks.

J. Scott Evans says his objection isn't that it sounds whiny — it's the price. Evans is associate general counsel at Adobe Systems, and for a trademark owner like his to claim Adobe.sucks would cost $2,500 a year. That's more than 100 times the typical fee.

Amazon unveiled a new shopping tool for Prime members for certain products.
Screenshot from YouTube

Marcie Sillman talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Amazon Dash, a new service the retailer hopes will make ordering Amazon goods as simple as pressing a button.

California Gov. Jerry Brown has been under fire for not requiring new water restrictions for the agriculture sector, despite historic rules restricting urban use by 25 percent.

On ABC’s “This Week,” Brown said that although more water is used in almond production than is used by all residents and businesses in San Francisco combined, the agriculture sector is too important to risk.

You know the beautiful, mass-produced tomatoes you can buy at the grocery store? You can drop one and it'll bounce back unharmed, but doesn't taste like much.

Restaurant check
Flickr Photo/Quinn Dombrowski (CC-BY-NC-ND)

With Seattle’s minimum wage rising, do you still need to tip? Who gains from Expedia’s move to Seattle? And in a Seattle road rage incident caught on tape, are you more like the driver or the cyclist?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant, Live Wire’s Luke Burbank, and Civic Cocktail’s Joni Balter.

Northwest asparagus fields are sprouting about 10 days earlier than usual this spring. It’s in time for Easter brunch, but a headache for farmers.

Northwest utilities are fighting pressure to end to all use of coal-fired power -- even when it's generated in places like Utah and Montana.

Many people are surprised to find out how much coal-fired power the Northwest still uses, even with all of its hydroelectric dams and wind farms. Oregon still gets about a third of its electricity from coal. In Washington, it's about 15 percent.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Expedia, one of the world’s largest online travel companies, is going to be doing some traveling of its own soon. It’s moving across the lake from Bellevue to Seattle.

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols headed to Bellevue to see how people are taking the news.

Amgen is moving out, and Expedia is moving into Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Chas Redmond (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Douglas Quinby, vice president of research for Phocuswright, a travel industry research firm, about Expedia's 20 years of innovation. The online travel company recently announced that it would move its headquarters from Bellevue to Seattle by 2018.

Retirement AARP
Flickr Photo/Bo Nash (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds interviews AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins about how many older Americans have not saved for their retirement. She also talks about a measure in the Washington State Legislature that would make it easier for self-employed people and small businesses to set up retirement plans.

Omar Abdulalim and Shuad Farole send money every month to Farole's aunt in Somalia. She uses the money to pay for food, housing and school fees for 12 children.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle's Somali-American community and elected officials came together Tuesday night to discuss a worsening problem: There is no longer a reliable way for people here to send money to families in Somalia.

Since February, all banks in the U.S. have stopped offering these remittance services to Somalia.

The Seattle area is home to the third largest Somali community in the country, so the abrupt change is acutely felt here.

In the 1960s and '70s, Howard Johnson's restaurants were the biggest chain in the country, with more than 1,000 locations.

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