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Federal regulators are pledging a full-scale review of the design and build of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. In a news conference, the Federal Aviation Administration said it will get to the root cause of a set of problems, including last week’s fire on a Dreamliner at Boston's Logan Airport.

Boeing 787
AP Photo/Stephan Savoia / Associated Press

The Federal Aviation Administration said this morning that the Boeing 787 will undergo a comprehensive design, manufacture and assembly review.  The announcement  follows two separate incidents with  the so-called Dreamliners operated by Japan Airlines. The first was a fire in a battery pack of an auxiliary power unit and the second was a fuel leak.  

Actor Patrick Dempsy
AP Photo/Evan Agostini

The Seattle-based Tully’s Coffee company was sold at a bankruptcy auction Jan. 3. But a number of bidders and stakeholders are contesting that sale. Now US Bankruptcy Judge Karen Overstreet will review the deal.

Tony Angell
Flickr photo/Andrew Nicholson

Naturalist, illustrator and sculptor Tony Angell shares his home and his imagination with birds. He joins us to talk about the ecological role birds play in our lives and how the natural world inspires his creativity.

Rusty Blazenhoff / Flickr

The Liquor Control Board is currently drafting the rules for how to apply for a license to grow marijuana in Washington state.  Several groups made up of lawyers, lobbyists and farmers have formed, and they’re looking to influence the board’s decisions.

One of these organizations is the Cannabis Business Group. Ross Reynolds talks with their board member, Hilary Bricken, a cannabis business lawyer.

The Russian Mall Boom

Jan 3, 2013

Shopping malls have come to Russia. Investors as diverse as IKEA and Wall Street banks are funneling money into new Russian shopping centers. They are big, and very popular. Russian malls are anchored by grocery stores, where aisles full of fresh food dazzle older shoppers who still carry memories of shortages and food lines. We talk with The New York Times' Moscow correspondent Andrew Kramer about the malls of Russia.

Victoria Times-Colonist columnist Les Leyne brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton shares some of the movie offerings at Seattle's newly reopened Museum of History and Industry. Then, Michael Parks looks at Amazon's big 2012, Microsoft's make-or-break 2013 and what Boeing's backlog means for the region's employment.

Top Canadian News In 2012

Dec 26, 2012
The Canadian flag.
Flickr Photo/Christopher Policarpio (CC BY 2.0)

Vaughn Palmer joins us to take a look back at the big stories in Canada. From the pipeline proposals to the appointment of a Canadian to be head of the Bank of England to the hockey strike, we will look back on Canada's year.

SALEM, Ore. - Governor John Kitzhaber called the Special Session after he said Nike was being courted by other states for a major expansion. The Democrat said he wanted lawmakers to authorize the governor to extend Nike an offer: In exchange for freezing the way Oregon calculates its taxes for as long as 30 years, Nike would agree to spend at least $150 million in capital improvements and expand by at least 500 jobs. Lawmakers grumbled about the short timeframe to consider the proposal, but in the end relatively few voted against it. Democratic Senator Mark Hass said it was a fair bargain.

Muraco Kyashna-tocha with cockatoo
Amy Radil

Marijuana legalization in Washington is taking effect against a patchwork of conflicting city laws. Some cities don’t allow marijuana dispensaries. But Seattle began requiring business licenses for them last year. Some medical marijuana providers see benefits to playing by cities’ rules. Others are fighting their restrictions.    

Medical marijuana providers are challenging Seattle’s licensing rules in court. They say having to obtain business licenses forces them to incriminate themselves under federal law.

Image Courtesy/Vulcan

The Seattle City Council is debating a plan that would transform a huge swath of the city’s center, and that for the first time would allow developers to build residential high rises just a block from Lake Union.

LinkedIn profile photos

Ross Reynolds interviews two prominent Seattle investors about business and politics.  Nick Hanauer was the first non-family investor in Amazon.  He’s currently a venture capitalist with Second Avenue Partners and a major Democratic donor and activist involved with a variety of causes.  Richard Barton is a former Microsoft executive and the founder of the travel website Expedia and the real estate site Zillow.  He also supports a number of philanthropic causes, in part through the Barton Family Foundation.  

The Hobbit
courtesy Warner Bros. Entertainment

Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada. Film critic Robert Horton previews "The Hobbit." Then, we look at Northwest companies in the news with Michael Parks.

Jeff Rubin was a high-flying economist at a major Canadian investment bank, until he decided to write a book about how high oil prices were going to flatten the global economy.  Ross Reynolds talks Jeff Rubin about the steadily mounting demand for cheap oil in a world of dwindling supply.

daimler.com/car2go

Maybe you’ve heard of the car-sharing service, Zipcar. It’s like a club where members can borrow cars for a set fee. On Monday, the Seattle City Council is expected to approve another similar car-sharing service to launch in the city next year.

Lots of people want to help pay to weatherize your home. But that money can be hard to get. Navigating all the public utility rebates and incentive programs — what a headache!

In Seattle, there's a program called  Community Power Works to help.  It's a partnership between the feds and the city of Seattle. And it's only here until the federal stimulus money runs out. Ross talks with the program's manager, Joshua Curtis.

Leafly.com
courtesy/Leafly.com

Marijuana has been historically cast as a dangerous drug for outcasts and societal dropouts. But with the passage of I-502, marijuana is going mainstream. A Seattle web entrepreneur is building tools for the masses to bring marijuana – and its users – into the 21st century.

 


A possible strike or lock out at Northwest grain terminals would have a profound effect on U.S. wheat exports. 

Author's LinkedIn Profile

What happens when the demand for profit by media companies drives news coverage? Seattle reporter Claudia Rowe joins Ross Reynolds to talk about the changing landscape of journalism in 2012. She’s been in journalism for more than 20 years, writing most recently for The New York Times and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

Conlangs: The Art Of Fake Languages

Nov 26, 2012

Constructed languages, or "conlangs," are the made-up tongues that bring the worlds of "Avatar,"  "Lord of the Rings" and "Star Trek" to life. We talk with linguist David J. Peterson, creator of the Dothraki language for HBO's "Game of Thrones," about what goes into creating a language from scratch.

Hasby/flickr

Seattle City Light has an unexpected pot of money on its hands. The utility says it needs to give away $5 million before the end of the year.

The money is earmarked for businesses that want to become more energy-efficient. It will pay for up to 70 percent of the cost of new lighting, heating and cooling systems, or other energy-efficient equipment.

But even with the subsidy, businesses have been slow to sign on this year.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Utility regulators are on the verge of ending the automatic delivery of White Pages phone books to Washington households. Legislation to do the same in Oregon hasn't gone anywhere.

In Washington and Oregon, state law requires the local phone company to deliver a phone book to each landline customer. But telecom companies contend most consumers no longer want a printed copy of the White Pages dropped on their doorsteps.

Frontier Communications government affairs manager Carl Gipson made that case to state regulators in Olympia.

Does the business of medicine need more accountability? Dr. Marty Makary thinks so and discusses what needs to happen with Ross Reynolds.

HOQUIAM, Wash. – Nearly 300,000 people in Washington are still unemployed and looking for work. But there was reason to celebrate Monday in coastal Grays Harbor County – where the unemployment rate is tied for the highest in the state. A shuttered paper mill there recently roared back to life. With it came 175 jobs.

It was a party atmosphere inside the long, narrow shipping warehouse at Harbor Paper. Several hundred people milled about as dignitaries, including Governor Chris Gregoire, mounted a makeshift stage.

A new online Seattle startup called Leafly is targeting medical marijuana patients.  The website (and mobile apps) feature information about medical cannabis strains and dispensaries based on tens of thousands of patient-generated reviews.  Ross Reynolds talks with Leafly’s CEO Brendan Kennedy about how the site works.

The Seattle Times' Political Ads Cause Controversy

Oct 19, 2012
The Seattle Times
Flickr photo/Mr. T in D.C.

The Seattle Times Company began running its own political ads on Wednesday in support of Republican gubernatorial candidate Rob McKenna and same-sex marriage.

Industry observers are questioning this new move.

Alan Fisco, an executive with The Seattle Times, says print newspapers miss out on the millions of dollars in campaign spending that go to broadcast television.

Sodo stadiums century link safeco
Flickr Photo/SDOT Photos (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bZhk8f

The King County Council and Seattle City Council both gave the go-ahead for an agreement to build a new professional basketball and hockey arena in Seattle.

The union that represents Longshore workers plans to file a lawsuit to stop it.

Flickr Photo/Pylon757

Negotiators for the Boeing Company and its engineering and technical union are back at the negotiating table today. That’s after union members soundly rejected the company’s latest contract offer.

More than 21,000 members of SPEEA, the Society For Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace, voted by mail on the company’s contract proposal. When the votes were counted last night, 96 percent of engineers and 97 percent of technical workers had voted ‘no.’

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