business

Cary Chin works at the front desk of Seattle-based Gravity Payments. CEO Dan Price told his employees that he was cutting his own salary and using company profits so they would each earn a base salary of $70,000.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke speaks with Karen Weise, a reporter for Bloomberg Businessweek, about Dan Price, CEO of Gravity Payments in Seattle. Price rose to fame after raising the minimum wage at his company to $70,000. But Weise says he created an image of altruism while downplaying some inconvenient facts. 

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg at TechCrunch Disrupt 2012.
Flickr Photo/JD Lasica (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1N4lDVX

Bill Radke talks to Whitney Williams, director of the local charity consulting firm Williams Works, about Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's pledge to donate 99 percent of his shares to charitable causes — and how it compares to Seattle's own billionaire philanthropist, Bill Gates.

A fresh agricultural foe has orchardists bulldozing and burning cherry trees across Washington and Oregon.

Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. at KUOW Public Radio on Tuesday.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A large statue of George Washington, the first U.S. president, looms large over the University of Washington’s main campus.

Should the statue’s inscription read “slave owner”? Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. believes so.

Activists deliver a petition asking the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to divest from fossil fuels.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

While the world's richest man was meeting with world leaders in Paris at the global climate summit, climate activists marched on his foundation's Seattle headquarters Monday.

Bill Radke speaks with Paul Guppy, vice president of research at the Washington Policy Center, and John Burbank, executive director of the Economic Opportunity Institute, about the tax breaks given to Boeing in Washington state. 

T-Mobile employees protest outside the company's headquarters in Bellevue.
Courtesy of Communication Workers of America

Jeannie Yandel speaks to Angela Agganis about her lawsuit against T-Mobile. She says the company forced her to sign a nondisclosure agreement after she reported being sexually harassed by her supervisor.  

Bill Radke talks to John Cook, writer and co-founder of Geekwire, about three Seattle startups that are innovators in their field: Arivale, Pluto VR and OfferUp, which are all on Geekwire's "Seattle 10."

Amazon has released a glimpse of what its much-anticipated drone deliveries could look like, although it warns the service is still very much in a testing phase.

Port of Seattle cranes loom overhead. After a port slowdown last year, retailers and growers are trying to repair the damage of lost business.
Flickr Photo/Dennis Hamilton (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1SxOe9r

The port slowdown may have ended last year, but it has raised the question: How can we prevent this from happening again?

The answer, say national retailers, is to negotiate the port workers' contracts sooner.

ISIS brings in millions and the US is all but helpless to stop it.

Nov 24, 2015
Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

In the wake of the attacks in Paris, more and more people are saying that when it comes to ISIS, it's time to follow the money.

But where does ISIS — often described as the richest terrorist organization — get their cash from?

According to Cam Simpson, a reporter for Bloomburg Business, the answer to that question is oil.

Parental Leave: Is It Fair To Employees Without Kids?

Nov 23, 2015
Baby kid mom parent
Flickr Photo/DonkerDink (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/21d0GBQ

The Seattle City Council on Monday rejected another attempt to increase paid family leave for city workers from four weeks to 12. Estimated cost: $1.5 million a year.

On The Record earlier, Bill Radke heard about the pros and cons of paid parental leave from Kristen Rowe-Finkbeiner, executive director of MomsRising, and Paul Guppy, vice president of research for the Washington Policy Center.

The U.S. drug giant Pfizer and its smaller rival Allergan have agreed to merge, creating the world's biggest pharmaceutical company by sales.

The $160 billion deal is the largest example so far of a corporate inversion, in which a U.S. company merges with a foreign company and shifts its domicile overseas in order to lower its corporate taxes.

If you watch sports on TV, you can't miss the barrage of advertising for fantasy sports websites. Washington and Montana are two of only six states that keep out fantasy sports operators such as FanDuel and DraftKings.

Street sign on Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Todd A Bishop (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1MGSP5J

Bill Radke talks with University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about the impact of Microsoft on the economy and culture of the Pacific Northwest.

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