One of the best-selling items right now at the High Bridge Arms gun shop in San Francisco is not a firearm or ammunition, says general manager Steven Alcairo. It's souvenir T-shirts that say "San Francisco's Last Gun Store."

Alcairo says people around the country are buying them to support the shop, which is closing at the end of the month.

"They're blowing out of here. We've been boxing them and sending them off to different states," he says.

High Bridge Arms has been open for 63 years, and it has sentimental value for customers like Steven Walker.

Need a fix of bright fall foliage? Kyle Waring can help with that. He’s now in his second year of business collecting and selling autumn leaves.

Waring tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about his business called Ship Foliage and how he preserves the leaves. And for another seasonal fix, if New England has another snowy winter, Waring will continue his second year of Ship Snow, Yo! – packing and shipping that fluffy white stuff.

Marion Yoshino, left, and Fred Felleman are vying for a spot on the Port Commission. Both opposed the port's support of Shell Oil's drilling ventures in the Arctic.
KUOW Photos/Carolyn Adolph

There was public outrage this year when the Port of Seattle agreed to service Shell’s Arctic drilling fleet.

Voters made their voices heard in the August primary by choosing two people who campaigned against the oil giant.

Volkswagen admitted it intentionally cheated on federal emissions tests. The German automaker now faces billions of dollars in fines and litigation, plus the cost of fixing some 11 million diesel cars worldwide.

That's just the company. The scandal is costing owners, too — at least those who are trying to sell their VW diesels. Not surprisingly, resale prices for the affected cars have been falling.

Seattle-based Alaska Airlines has fallen to worst among the U.S. mainline carriers for mishandled bags. Fortunately for Northwest travelers, the unhappy distinction may be short-lived.

Beer taps at Elysian Brewing Company.
Flickr Photo/ctj71081 (CC BY SA 2.0)/

David Hyde sits down with Dick Cantwell, co-founder and former head brewer of Elysian Brewing Company, to discuss what the merger of the two biggest beer companies, Anheuser Busch InBev and SABMiller, means for the craft beer industry.

In this Sept. 10, 2014 file photo, detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center in Texas. About 70 children from the border have been placed with foster families in Washington state.
AP Photo/Eric Gay

Expansion plans are underway for an immigration program linked to Microsoft, but it's something that has nothing to do with computers or technology.

It’s a non-profit called KIND, or Kids In Need of Defense, and it provides free attorneys to immigrant children who face deportation.

Jack Bogle is leading a populist revolution on Wall Street.

The longtime investment guru, who 40 years ago founded the investment company the Vanguard Group, wants everyday Americans to make a lot more money in the stock market — and give less of their returns away to financial firms.

And the surprising thing about his revolution? He's winning.

If you've consumed coconut oil or coconut meat lately, there's a reasonable chance it was imported from Thailand. And if it was, there's an even better chance the farmer who grew that coconut had a monkey fetch it from a tall tree. is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/

Jeannie Yandel talks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about why Amazon responded to the New York Times' piece about its work culture two months after the fact, why the video messaging app Snapchat secretly opened a Seattle engineering office, and what the closure of the Urbanspoon office says about the Seattle tech landscape.  

Americans collectively are losing billions of dollars a year out of their retirement accounts because they're paying excessive fees, according to researchers studying thousands of employer-sponsored retirement plans across the country.

The rearchers say part of the trouble is that many employers that offer 401(k) plans to their workers are outgunned by financial firms that sell them bad plans loaded with hefty fees. That's especially true, they say, for small and midsize employers that don't have much financial expertise in-house.

In 1933, Washington state had an income tax. So what happened?
Illustration by Drew Christie

What is the history of Washington state's political allergy to an income tax? Steven Thomson of Olympia posed this question to KUOW's Local Wonder.

We had an income tax once in Washington state.

It was during the Great Depression, and a lot of people were down and out.

People were so excited about the income tax that they voted twice. First, they changed the state constitution to allow the tax. Then voters approved the tax – 70 percent in favor.

High Risk Awaits Immigrants In Alaska’s 'Ballard North'

Oct 18, 2015
Salahaldin Adam, outside the Trident North plant in Cordova. Adam is showing the swelling on his right hand, which he hurt after just a few weeks on the job.
KUOW Photo/Alex Stonehill

In Ballard, a human resources manager for Trident Seafoods talks to a room of people hoping to be seafood processors – warning them of the dangers of the job.

SEAN CASADY, HR DIRECTOR: "You need to be able to stand on your feet for up to 16 hours a day in cold and wet conditions."

Sonny Nguyen outside of the auto parts store he owns in the town of Unalaska on the port of Dutch Harbor. He’s a refugee from Vietnam who moved to Seattle in 1976 and then went to Dutch Harbor where he’s lived on and off for 30 years.
KUOW Photo/Alex Stonehill

The yard in front of the CARQUEST Auto Parts store on this remote Alaskan island is crowded with old cars.

Sonny Nguyen, the store’s owner, keeps them because it can be faster to grab a part from the front yard than to get it shipped out here. Nguyen first came here in 1977.

Silme Domingo, left, and Gene Viernes, right, were murdered at a union hall in Seattle. It took a determined group of people to expose an international conspiracy behind the murders.
University of Washington Digital Archives

On Monday, June 1, 1981, Seattle’s KIRO TV reported a shooting in Pioneer Square.

KIRO: “The shots were fired right around a quarter of 5 this evening, shots that apparently were not heard by anyone else. The two victims were inside the union office.”