business

File photo of the Port of Seattle.
Courtesy of the Port of Seattle

Ross Reynolds talks with Peter Tirschwell about how the ongoing labor dispute between longshoremen and west coast port operators could drive away business from the Ports of Seattle and Tacoma. Tirschwell is chief content officer for The Journal of Commerce.

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

A labor dispute with dock workers has led to slowdowns and backups at West Coast ports. One part of the Port of Seattle's cargo business is booming. KUOW's John Ryan reports.

The worsening labor dispute at West Coast container ports is causing shippers to search for alternate pathways to and from Asia.

Demonstrators in Seattle form a human chain around City Hall in support of a $15 minimum wage in April 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about the potential impact of the $15 minimum wage on Seattle's manufacturing sector.

Marcie Sillman talks with Washington state Sen. Michael Baumgartner, R-Spokane, about his proposal to offer the federal minimum wage as opposed to the higher state minimum wage for newly employed teens working in the summer months.

Marcie Sillman talks to Bradley Staats, associate professor at the University of North Carolina and visiting associate professor at the Whatron School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, about his study on worker productivity during good and bad weather.

The Los Angeles City Council is currently considering whether to raise the minimum wage to $15.25 an hour by 2019. It would follow Seattle and San Francisco, two cities that approved $15 minimum wages in the past year.

If you're a Northwest camper, chances are some of your gear, like your camp stove or sleeping pad, was manufactured in Seattle by Cascade Designs.
Flickr Photo/Tom Check (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with David Burroughs, vice chairman of Cascade Designs, about how Seattle's rising minimum wage is affecting his business.

Amazon.com logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Amazon's affect on brick and mortar retail.

Port of Seattle, port, stadium, Century Link
Flickr Photo/ArtBrom (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph to get the latest upates on the labor dispute that shut down Seattle ports over the weekend.

Also, Ross Reynolds interviews John Ahlquist, co-author of the book, "In the Interest of Others: Organizations and Social Activism,” which looks at the history of the longshoremen and the union's involvement in politics. Ahlquist is a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

tesoro workers anacortes
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

About 200 workers at the Tesoro refinery in Anacortes, Washington, are on strike. They've had a 24-hour picket line at the plant's main gate for more than a week.

Washington state agriculture officials are preparing for the scenario that highly-contagious bird flu will be in the Northwest -- maybe for years.

geoduck
Flickr Photo/USDAgov

Marcie Sillman talks with Sean McDonald, a research scientist at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, to find out what impact geoduck farms can have. The demand for Puget Sound's weirdest looking clams has turned growing and harvesting them into a multi-million dollar industry. Now Taylor Shellfish wants to build a new 25-acre geoduck farm in Pierce County, but some environmental groups and residents have concerns.

Port of Seattle.
Flickr Photo/SLV Native (CC-BY-NC-ND)

All ports on the West Coast will be closed for business this weekend – a response to ongoing worker slowdown, said a spokesman for the Pacific Maritime Association.

The association represents the 29 terminal operators on the West Coast.

“After three months of union slowdowns, it makes no sense to pay extra for less work,” said spokesman Wade Gates. “Especially if there is no end in sight to the union’s actions which needlessly brought West Coast ports to the brink of gridlock.”

Ross Reynolds interviews Marketplace senior economics contributor Chris Farrell about his new book, “Unretirement,” which delves into how the last third of life is being re-imagined. 

By 2030 one in five Americans will be 65 and older. Farrell calls it a revolution in the making that will change the workplace in the 21st century the way women entering the workplace impacted the last half of the 20th century. He argues that "unretirement" will benefit not just seniors, but us all. 

Pages