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Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke talks to Andrew McIntosh, aerospace reporter for The Puget Sound Business Journal, about the effect China's new tariffs will have on Boeing and the Puget Sound area's aerospace community. 

A public utility in north central Washington state wants to root out a new kind of outlaw: the rogue bitcoin miner.

Washington is the top cherry producing state in the country.
Flickr Photo/beautifulcataya (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6KiQQK

New tariffs on exports to China could have a big impact on Washington state. Tariffs went into effect Monday on 128 American products, including fruit, pork and metal pipes, in retaliation for proposed U.S. tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum.


Standard Oil depicted as an octopus, parodying its status as a monopoly.
Public Domain

In 1890, the Sherman Act was passed. Its purpose was to preserve a competitive marketplace against potential consumer abuses.

But the law isn't supposed to punish "innocent monopoly," or monopoly achieved by merit alone. So the question is: how innocent is Amazon’s monopoly? 

A worker in Boise puts together an apartment bound for Seattle.
Guerdon Modular Design

The apartment complex at Aurora and North 109th Street in Seattle was built on the cheap.

Gayle Nowicki owns Gargoyles Statuary in Seattle's University District. She says small businesses are already closing due to taxes and zoning changes.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Small businesses in Seattle disagree about a possible new tax to ease homelessness. But they agree on this: They can't afford it. 

Handing over the keys to a new rental property.
Flickr Photo/harry b (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/xSNB92

If you’ve rented a new apartment in Seattle in the last year, chances are that you ran into the first-in-time law. It required landlords to rent to the first qualified applicant. When enacted, the law was touted as a first in the nation attempt to protect tenants’ rights. Landlords argued that it overrode their property rights – and yesterday, a judge agreed. 

Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner displays a pen from the signing ceremony of Washington State's Equal Pay Opportunity Act.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Starbucks claims to have solved the thorny problem of pay equity. At least in their current workforce. At least in the US. And this isn’t a final announcement, just a milestone in an ongoing endeavor…

A mural commissioned by the Aurora Merchants Association is shown on Monday, March 26, 2018, near the intersection of Aurora Avenue North and N.105th St., in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Aurora Avenue North is a place where you can buy a car, sell a car or get fancy rims for your tires. If your vehicle has ever been towed in north Seattle, you may have written a painfully large check to Lincoln Towing so they’d release it. For decades, Aurora’s business community has been dominated by car-oriented businesses.

That time is coming to an end. And those businesses are fighting to maintain what influence they have left.


A group of people jog across Lenora Street, on Thursday, October 5, 2017, in front of Amazon's biodomes, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Bloomberg's Emily Chang, author of the book "Brotopia: Breaking Up The Boy's Club Of Silicon Valley," and Kristi Coulter, former Amazon employee and writer of the upcoming book "Nothing Good Can Come From This," about how the sometimes misogynistic and aggressive work culture in places like Silicon Valley shuts women out of the booming tech industry. 

A wild Pacific salmon, left, next to an escaped farm-raised Atlantic salmon, right, on Aug. 22 at Home Port Seafoods in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Atlantic salmon farming has been banned from Washington state waters. 

Gov. Jay Inslee signed the ban on non-native fish farms into law Thursday morning in Olympia. 

Tyler Pederson, head stillman at Westland Distillery, climbs onto the still to check to see if the spirits were condensing on the still's plates on Monday, March 19, 2018, at Westland Distillery in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

You may want to think twice before you start a business making whiskey in Washington state. That’s because Washington’s liquor taxes are the highest in the country, according to a new report out today by the nonprofit Tax Foundation.


Wondering which beverages get hit by Seattle's new sweetened beverage tax?
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

I don’t normally pick fights.

But I had just gotten the last of four rabies shots at Bartell Drugs, and I was feeling punchy. And thirsty. I wanted a diet ginger ale – you know, something to take away the sting of the needle and the memory of getting attacked by wild dogs on a recent trip to Thailand.

Computer technology keyboard
Flickr Photo/Anonymous Account (CC BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1Zj35Hj

Let's travel to the future for a moment and step inside a fish and chips joint for some lunch. Inside - the manager is planning a new promotional campaign. She's thinking of who's coming in, and what they want to eat. And she's doing it using Big Data.

In the sunny colonial city of Oaxaca, Mexico, diners at the upscale restaurant Los Danzantes might notice their fellow patrons drinking a brown, carbonated soda. It looks like Coca-Cola and it tastes — almost — like Coca-Cola. But Coca-Cola it is not.

It's a drink called Zega-Cola, an all-natural substitute to the ubiquitous soft drink. It's made in the nearby village Santa Ana Zegache, and these days, many Oaxacans are clamoring for it. Its creator, a carpenter named Antonio Ambrosio Salvador, sold more Zega-Cola last month than in his entire first year of production.

Shoppers and consumer advocates are up in arms after finding out that major retailers have been keeping closer tabs on them than they thought.

Retailers such as Best Buy, Victoria's Secret and The Home Depot have been working with a third-party organization to manage a database that determines which of their consumers should be banned from making returns, The Wall Street Journal reports.

KUOW reporters Joshua McNichols and Carolyn Adolph host 'That's Debatable: Amazon is Good for Seattle' on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

We recently hosted a debate to answer a simple question: Is Amazon good for Seattle?

And the answer is: We don’t really know for certain. But the debate did have a clear winner.


Apples at the Olympia Farmers Market.
Flickr Photo/WSDA (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ZsGd1C

Last week, President Trump slapped tariffs on imports of aluminum and steel. As the most trade-dependent state in the country, what's the potential impact of a trade war on Washington?

Kim Malcolm sat down with Debra Glassman, senior lecturer in business economics at the University of Washington to discuss.

"Untitled", Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1982. Last year the piece sold for $110 million, making it the most expensive piece of American artwork in history.
Courtesy Seattle Art Museum

What does it feel like to be in the room with $100 million? You can find out soon. The most expensive piece of American artwork ever sold at auction — a painting by artist Jean-Michel Basquiat — is coming to the Seattle Art Museum.

KUOW hosts 'That's Debatable: Amazon is Good for Seattle' on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Explain this: while half the people at KUOW's Amazon debate Wednesday came to the conclusion that the company is not good for Seattle, three-quarters of the audience also said they have an Amazon Prime membership. 


From left, Amazon software development interns Min Vu, Cindy Wang, Jason Mar, Katie Shin and Louis Yang, walk after getting bananas from the Amazon Community Banana Stand outside of the Amazon Meeting Center on Thursday, October 5, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle officials will once again try to pass an employee head tax on businesses. A similar idea failed in the city council last year, but council members — including Lisa Herbold, Lorena González and Mike O’Brien —  promised to bring it back.

A new proposal slated for review this spring would tax Seattle's highest-grossing companies based on their number of employees.

Editor's note: Following sharp criticism of how this MIT study was conducted, its authors say they will redo their analysis. Uber chief economist Jonathan Hall gives his assessment of the "inconsistent logic" leading to an undercount of hourly earnings and "a major error" in the conclusions in this post.

Updated at 7:40 p.m. ET

Walmart and Dick's Sporting Goods say they won't sell guns to customers under 21, and both are putting new restrictions on ammunition sales.

Dick's Sporting Goods, one of the largest sports retailers in the U.S., has announced it is immediately ending its sales of military-style semi-automatic rifles and is requiring all customers to be older than 21 to buy a firearm at its stores. Additionally, the company no longer will sell high-capacity magazines.

Washington DNR

The Canadian owner of an Atlantic salmon farm that collapsed last summer near Anacortes vows to use the North American Free Trade Agreement to save its fish farms in Puget Sound. New Brunswick, Canada-based Cooke Aquaculture says it will pursue mandatory arbitration under NAFTA if the Washington legislature tries to phase out Atlantic salmon farming.

L.L. Bean's outdoor gear — including its signature Bean Boots prized by campers and hipsters alike — is no longer guaranteed for life.

In a letter to customers Friday morning, the company said it has updated its return policy to give customers one year to return purchases, with a receipt. The previous lifetime guarantee, which enabled customers to return products years — or even decades — after purchase, has long been a selling point for the company.

Bike share bikes in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle’s in the middle of a big bike share experiment, with bikes everywhere that you can rent for only a dollar.

It’s so cheap. So how do these companies make money?


Kyle Rowe wants bike sharing companies and cities to be true partners.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

This is a story about dockless bike sharing, but it begins with a story about Uber. Uber's complicated history with cities has made city officials more willing to push back.


Raft Hollingsworth III laughs with his sister Joy Hollingsworth on Thursday, January 18, 2018, at The Hollingsworth Cannabis Company in Mason County.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Last year sales of legal marijuana reached $1.2 billion. Despite the growth, people of color are left out. Less than 10 percent of current licensed retailers and producers are minorities.  One reason: stigma.

When Joy Hollingsworth and her brother Raft decided to grow pot as a family business, they told only a few about it. Joy says growing up, pot was taboo.


Joy Hollingsworth, left, and Raft Hollingsworth III stand in their cloning greenhouse on Thursday, January 18, 2018, at The Hollingsworth Cannabis Company in Mason County.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

When Washington voters approved legalizing recreational marijuana in 2012, entrepreneurs jumped at the new business opportunity.

Marijuana sales continue to grow, with the industry doing  more than a billion dollars in sales last year. But this new industry is overwhelmingly white —  and there are many obstacles for people of color.

One African American family is staking their future on pot despite the barriers.

berries
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

More women are speaking out about sexual abuse and harassment as part of the renewed #MeToo movement.

But for the women picking the fruits and vegetables we buy at local supermarkets, talking about daily abuse isn’t easy.

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