business

Fishmonger Andrew Wichmann says cruise ship traffic is great for Seattle but doesn't do much for him directly. They can't bring food onboard. "We wouldn't survive without local clientele."
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The cruise ship docked at 7 a.m.

By 8 a.m., Danielle Smith and her family were at Pike Place Market, walking through the stalls. They had 48 hours to enjoy the city before flying home to Atlanta.

There's a process in place now for Indian tribes and the state of Washington to jointly regulate marijuana should any tribes choose to legalize and sell it.

Updated 7:38 p.m. May 12, 2015: This story has been updated to include more details and additional comments from the insurance industry.

Many companies reward their most loyal customers with incentives, discounts and freebies. But in car insurance, the opposite can actually happen. A driver can be punished with a higher premium just for being loyal to the company. 

It's called price optimization, and it happens to lots of people all the time. A driver could have no history of accidents but all of a sudden their car insurance goes up.

business board room
Flickr Photo/Eric Dan (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Colleen Brown, chairwoman of American Apparel and board member of multiple local companies, about her push to get more women on corporate boards in the Pacific Northwest.

Of all the things you're considering for your next meal today, bugs are probably not on the menu.

Toshiba. Sony. Sharp. You know those brand names because they dominated the Japanese economy's global rise in the '80s. But that was 30 years ago. As the Japanese economy stagnates, it's unclear which new companies will replace them.

Doga Makiura is Japanese, and a startup founder. But he's not a startup founder in Japan. He created businesses in other Asian countries instead.

Why not be an entrepreneur in his native country?

File photo of a commerical chicken farm
Flickr Photo/Chesapeake Bay Program (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde speaks with Oregonian reporter Lynne Terry about her recent story about salmonella outbreaks involving Foster Farms called "A Game of Chicken. "

A drive across the Northwest quickly reveals things look really dry everywhere.

From Wenatchee, Washington, to Bend, Oregon, whitewater rafting guides are preparing for a flood of business as school lets out. But this year’s low snowpack could mean less whitewater and more demand for trips.

Craft bourbon, like craft beer, is in the midst of a boom: In the past 15 years, the number of distilleries in the U.S. has surged from just a handful to around 600.

Microsoft Windows 10
Flickr Photo/Miguel Angel Aranda

Marcie Sillman talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Microsoft's pitch to get software developers on board with Windows 10.

Convicted criminals in Oregon would not have to disclose their criminal history on job applications under a measure moving through the legislature.

Seattle skyline
Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with André Bearfield, co-founder of HERE Seattle, a professional organization for tech industry workers who are new to Seattle, about his experience moving to the city and encountering the "Seattle freeze."

Managers of Portland's largest commercial buildings will start tracking their energy use under a new city policy approved Wednesday.

Portland is joining 12 cities that already use the Energy Star reporting system, run by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Participating buildings have cut energy use by an average of more than 2 percent, just by monitoring and reporting, according to Alisa Kane with Portland's Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.

Starting next month, Alaska Airlines will explore charging extra for main cabin seats with more legroom and creature comforts.

Pages