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EarthFix Reports
5:04 am
Wed March 19, 2014

How Industry Specs And A Federal Loophole Allow Railroads To Avoid Response Planning Oversight

Unlike marine vessels, pipelines and terminal facilities, railroads are not required to file response plans for trains of tanker cars.
EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Neither states nor the federal government have oversight over how railroads plan for responding to spills from trains carrying crude oil, meaning environmental regulators cannot identify gaps in the plans or verify a railroad’s abilities to carry them out.

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Science & Technology
2:44 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

A Tour Of The Intellectual Ventures Lab In Bellevue

Pablos Holman is an inventor and futurist at Intellectual Ventures. Behind him are boxes of mosquitoes destined to be targets for the laser mosquito zapper.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds goes on a tour of the Intellectual Ventures Laboratory in Bellevue with inventor and futurist Pablos Holman.

Holman's team projects include a laser that can quickly detect if a person has malaria, a cooler that can keep vaccines from going bad and the high tech kitchen — more like a science lab actually — used to produce Nathan Myrhvold's 51 pound, multi-volume "Modernist Cuisine" books.

$15 An Hour
2:42 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

The Latest On The Minimum Wage Debate

Dominic Holden, associate editor at The Stranger.
From Dominic Holden's Twitter account.

Marcie Sillman talks with Dominic Holden, associate editor at The Stranger about the very latest on the minimum wage debate in Seattle.

Childhood Link
11:18 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Who Had Richer Parents, Doctors Or Artists?

Artists painting mural
Tim Pannell Corbis

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 11:59 am

A few weeks ago, we were sitting around the office arguing over this simple question: Who had richer parents, journalists or people working in finance? Doctors or artists? More generally: What's the link between household income during childhood and job choice during adulthood?

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EarthFix Reports
5:34 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Talks Set In Beijing On West Coast Shellfish Ban

Geoduck clams harvested from Puget Sound, along with most shellfish from the West Coast of the U.S., have not been allowed into China. But an upcoming meeting in Beijing between U.S. and Chinese officials could ease that ban.
Katie Campbell

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 1:36 pm

SEATTLE -- There are signs of a thaw in the icy trade relations between the United States and China over a Chinese ban on imported shellfish from the West Coast of the U.S.

Chinese officials have agreed to meet next week with U.S. counterparts to discuss China’s import ban on shellfish harvested from Alaska, Washington, Oregon and part of California.

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Transportation
4:23 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

As A First State To Regulate Ridesharing, California Offers Its Progress

Cars for the ridesharing company, Lyft, can be identified by the pink mustaches placed on the front bumper.
Flickr Photo/Bill Rosenfeld (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with San Francisco Chronicle reporter Carolyn Said about California's state-wide rideshare regulations. Said talks about how they are playing out in San Francisco and what Seattle's proposed driver caps could mean for rideshare companies all over.

Minimum Wage
3:46 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

David Neumark: Low-Income Family And Low-Wage Worker Are Related 'Very Loosely'

Flickr Photo/401(K) 2012 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with economist David Neumark at the University of California, Irvine, about what key issues Seattle needs to address before raising its minimum wage.

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Labor Expenses
11:39 am
Thu March 13, 2014

'It's Complicated:' A Small Business And Its Employees Struggle With Minimum Wage Debate

Destiny Sund, co-owner of The Confectional, steps in to help with mixing a crust with baker Heather Hodge.
Credit KUOW Photo/Deb Wang

The push to raise the minimum wage in Seattle was just a campaign slogan last fall. But now it's on a fast track. Mayor Ed Murray has said that he will propose a minimum wage increase this spring.

But many of the people who would be affected are just starting to assess the costs and benefits.

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Agriculture
8:40 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Farmers Upstream Of Wanapum Dam Can't Reach Columbia For Irrigation

File photo of a cherry orchard in Eastern Washington
Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 8:03 am

Thousands of acres of high-value cherry and apple orchards behind the damaged Wanapum Dam are at serious risk.

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Show Me The Money
3:27 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Free Agency: How NFL Players Get Raises

Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Golden Tate agreed to a 5-year deal with the Detroit Lions on Wednesday.
Flickr Photo/Football Schedule (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Art Thiel, founder of Sports Press Northwest, about the NFL free agency and how these deals could shake up the Seattle Seahawks' roster this offseason.

Affordable Housing
3:26 pm
Wed March 12, 2014

Real Estate Developer Responds To Picketing Tenants

The Theodora Rescue Committee and Lockhaven Tenants Union picketed at the Goodman Real Estate headquarters on Tuesday.
Tenants Union of Washington's Facebook page.

Marcie Sillman speaks with George Petrie, CEO of Goodman Real Estate, about its purchase of the Theodora apartments in Ravenna. Petrie responds to Tenants Union of Washington's accusations of the Seattle-based real estate developer as being "predatory."

Ski Resort Damages
8:46 am
Wed March 12, 2014

Intentional Avalanche Destroys Crystal Mountain Chairlift

The remains of a slab avalanche at Crystal Mountain.
Crystal Mountain Resort

An avalanche destroyed a chairlift at the Crystal Mountain resort near Mount Rainier on Monday afternoon when the resort was closed. The avalanche was intentionally set off by the resort's ski patrol and no one was hurt.

Despite the destruction, patrollers say they have no regrets.

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Container Ships
12:40 am
Wed March 12, 2014

After A Downturn, Global Shipping Bets Big On Everything

A container ship docked at Port Elizabeth in New Jersey. No one on the pier knows for sure what exactly the containers carry — anything from frozen chicken to computers.
Jonathan Blakley NPR

Originally published on Thu March 13, 2014 8:22 am

On a cold, blustery day at Port Elizabeth in New Jersey, one of several massive cranes whirs along a rail high above the pier, picks up a heavy container from a ship's deck and loads it on a waiting truck back on land. The truck drives away, another arrives, and the whole process starts again.

It's a scene played out every day along America's coasts as massive container ships from across the globe pull into deep-water seaports, waiting to be unloaded. The ships are enormous — some 10 stories high and several football fields long.

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Affordable Housing
3:55 pm
Tue March 11, 2014

Tenants Picket Goodman Real Estate

Flickr Photo/Ashley Brown (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Tim Doub, a resident of the Theodora apartments, and Eliana Horn, a community organizer with the Tenants Union of Washington State, about why they are picketing the Seattle-based Goodman Real Estate.

Tech News
3:48 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

New Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella Ushers In Changes

Flickr Photo/Heisenberg Media (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher and Todd Bishop discuss the changes Microsoft's new CEO Satya Nadella is implementing.

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