business

Restaurant check
Flickr Photo/Quinn Dombrowski (CC-BY-NC-ND)

With Seattle’s minimum wage rising, do you still need to tip? Who gains from Expedia’s move to Seattle? And in a Seattle road rage incident caught on tape, are you more like the driver or the cyclist?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant, Live Wire’s Luke Burbank, and Civic Cocktail’s Joni Balter.

Northwest asparagus fields are sprouting about 10 days earlier than usual this spring. It’s in time for Easter brunch, but a headache for farmers.

Northwest utilities are fighting pressure to end to all use of coal-fired power -- even when it's generated in places like Utah and Montana.

Many people are surprised to find out how much coal-fired power the Northwest still uses, even with all of its hydroelectric dams and wind farms. Oregon still gets about a third of its electricity from coal. In Washington, it's about 15 percent.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Expedia, one of the world’s largest online travel companies, is going to be doing some traveling of its own soon. It’s moving across the lake from Bellevue to Seattle.

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols headed to Bellevue to see how people are taking the news.

Amgen is moving out, and Expedia is moving into Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Chas Redmond (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Douglas Quinby, vice president of research for Phocuswright, a travel industry research firm, about Expedia's 20 years of innovation. The online travel company recently announced that it would move its headquarters from Bellevue to Seattle by 2018.

Retirement AARP
Flickr Photo/Bo Nash (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds interviews AARP CEO Jo Ann Jenkins about how many older Americans have not saved for their retirement. She also talks about a measure in the Washington State Legislature that would make it easier for self-employed people and small businesses to set up retirement plans.

Omar Abdulalim and Shuad Farole send money every month to Farole's aunt in Somalia. She uses the money to pay for food, housing and school fees for 12 children.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle's Somali-American community and elected officials came together Tuesday night to discuss a worsening problem: There is no longer a reliable way for people here to send money to families in Somalia.

Since February, all banks in the U.S. have stopped offering these remittance services to Somalia.

The Seattle area is home to the third largest Somali community in the country, so the abrupt change is acutely felt here.

In the 1960s and '70s, Howard Johnson's restaurants were the biggest chain in the country, with more than 1,000 locations.

Goats graze near Interstate 5 in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/cleverclevergirl (CC-BY-NC-ND)

When Amazon launched its Amazon Home Services this week, the stars of the new initiative were …

Goats.

Seattle goats, specifically, ready to trim back your pesky shrubbery.

Workers at Ivar's Salmon House on Lake Union will be getting a raise to $15 an hour before Seattle raises the minimum wage that high.
Flickr Photo/Peter Stevens (CC BY 2.0)

KUOW's Marcie Sillman talks with Bob Donegan, president and CEO of Ivar's, about why the popular Seattle fish and chips chain will give employees an immediate raise to $15 an hour, increase prices by about 20 percent and do away with tipping at its Lake Union restaurant.

Angie Garcia, 20, with her mom and 4-month-old daughter. Garcia works at McDonald's in Ballard, making $9.60 an hour. The new minimum wage "is going to change everything," she says.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Angie Garcia, a single mom who works at the McDonald's in Ballard, has planned how she’s going to spend the extra money she makes after the minimum wage increases to $11 an hour on Wednesday.

“It’s going to change everything. Because I can go back to school, I can start my college, so that is really big for me, like a really, really big help,” Garcia, 20, said. She currently earns $9.60 an hour.

Larenda Myres holds an iced coffee drink with a "Race Together" sticker on it at a Starbucks store in Seattle, Wednesday, March 18, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

KUOW's Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Koehn, a historian at Harvard Business School, about why more big businesses will have to take stands on political and social issues to keep customers coming back.

Frances Stevens could have been a contender. She was training to be a Golden Gloves boxer and working as a magazine publisher in 1997 when 1,000 copies of the latest issue arrived at her San Francisco office.

"I'd just turned 30. I was an athlete. I had a job that I loved, a life that I loved," she recalls. "And in a second my life changed."

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Seattle is known for its endless public process, so how did it become a city where $15 went from a campaign slogan to law in a matter of months?

The law kicks in on Wednesday, when the minimum wage in Seattle rises to $11 an hour. It’s the first phase of several years of planned increases eventually leading to a $15-an-hour minimum wage.  

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