business

The boats are owned by Americans. They fly American flags and work in American waters. The fish they catch — like premium ahi tuna and swordfish — is sold at American grocery stores, on shelves at Whole Foods and Costco.

But the men who catch those fish can't set foot on American soil, The Associated Press reports — and they aren't protected by American labor laws.

Wells Fargo Bank has been ordered to pay $185 million in fines and penalties to settle what the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau calls "the widespread illegal practice of secretly opening unauthorized deposit and credit card accounts."

Thousands of Wells Fargo employees opened the accounts in secret so they would get bonuses for hitting their sales targets, according to investigators. More than 2 million deposit and credit card accounts may have been created without customer authorization.

Hanjin Scarlet is at the dock in Prince Rupert BC after several days anchored offshore.
screenshot/ www.marinetraffic.com/

A judge in New Jersey has issued an order that is moving Hanjin cargo around the continent. 

The federal judge temporarily allowed Hanjin Shipping to have its South Korean bankruptcy protections recognized in the U.S.

At 4.9 percent, the nation's unemployment rate is half of what it was at the height of the Great Recession. But that number hides a big problem: Millions of men in their prime working years have dropped out of the workforce — meaning they aren't working or even looking for a job.

It's a trend that's held true for decades and has economists puzzled.

A Hanjin shipping container ship dwarfs a Washington State Ferry.
Flickr Photo/Jeff Youngstrom (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4HNML6

Hanjin of South Korea filed for bankruptcy protection earlier this week. It's one of the biggest shippers in the world, with ships often seen on Puget Sound and containers piled near our ports.

Now retailers are worried about the holiday goods that are in those containers.

The National Retail Federation is pleading with shippers to keep the movement of goods going. But around the world, port terminals are turning their backs on Hanjin ships.

Seattle City Hall
Flickr Photo/Daniel X. O'Neil (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1OGMTuh

Seattle leaders are pushing for a new level of worker's rights, on top of the city's $15 minimum wage law. The next proposal: predictable scheduling. The City Council will discuss the topic next week and vote on the legislation later in September.

The European Union's executive branch has found that Ireland granted unfair and illegal tax breaks to the tech giant Apple, and ruled that Apple now owes more than $14.5 billion in back taxes.

The commissioner in charge of competition policy, Margrethe Vestager, says that under EU rules, "Member states cannot give tax benefits to selected companies."

Bill Radke sits down with David Jones, a Subway franchisee and founder of the Blazing Onion restaurant chain, to discuss proposed secure scheduling legislation in Seattle. The law is aimed at giving workers more control over their schedules and threatens employers with penalties if they don't comply. But Jones feels it's misguided, will have unintended consequences and hurts businesses that are doing nothing wrong. 

The battle of the Joes isn't over yet.

On one hand, you have Trader Joe's — the U.S. grocery chain with a bit of a cult following for its quirky, exclusive products.

On the other hand, you have Pirate Joe's — the Canadian "gray market" grocery shop that sells Trader Joe's goods picked up in America and trucked across the border to Vancouver. There, at a significant markup, they're sold to Trader Joe's enthusiasts who don't fancy the thought of a border-crossing grocery run.

After two years of some of the worst fires and smoke the Northwest has ever seen, Washington’s Methow Valley is catching its breath. Dozens of businesses didn’t make it through and the fires still throw a long shadow.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Gentrification is not a new story here in Seattle. But is there anything people in Seattle can do to mitigate its effects?

Some aspiring business owners are seeking out the help of Pedro Gomez, who works with Seattle's Office of Economic Development.

Nove and Susan Meyers of Olympic Cascade Services Inc., said they were ending their legal challenge to Washington State Ferries' decision to give the food contract to Centerplate Inc. of Connecticut.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The food on Washington State Ferries is set to change.

Today a court injunction expires; that frees Washington State Ferries to sign a new contract with Centerplate of Connecticut.

I
Rachel Waldholz

The largest commercial cruise ship ever to attempt the Northwest Passage starts sailing through its frigid waters this week.  

The sea route over the top of Canada has historically been impassable, but ice melting in the Arctic has in recent years cleared a path for shipping vessels. Now, a 1,600-person, 13-deck cruise ship is plying those waters, too.

The Crystal Serenity left Seward, Alaska last week on a 32-day cruise that will take it around Alaska, through the Canadian Arctic, past Greenland and finally to New York.   

Editor's note: Updated at 9:20 am ET to include Mylan's announcement that it will reimburse consumers for some of their out-of-pocket costs.

EpiPens are in your friend's purse and your kid's backpack. The school nurse has a few, as does Grandma.

The medicine inside — epinephrine — has been around forever, and the handy gadget that injects it into your leg is not particularly new either.

Anna Ponder teaches a dance called stepping at the Steppers Unite Dance Studio - built in her garage. Ponder dances here with her student, Askia Heru.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Gentrification: It’s what happens when the people living in a low-income neighborhood get pushed out by new people with more money.

But some long-time residents manage to stay in gentrifying neighborhoods and thrive, like Anna Ponder, who teaches a dance style called stepping in Seattle's Columbia City neighborhood.

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