business

A recent New York Times article about harsh workplace culture at Amazon called attention to how the online retailer handles evaluations: Any co-worker can critique another any time, anonymously. Less exhaustive versions of the peer performance review — or 360 review as they're often known — have been popular for several years.

Liban Ahmed handles baggage at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. He says he'll use the extra money to buy a car, save for college and visit his mom in Mogadishu, who he has not seen in 15 years.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

About 4,700 workers at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport are about to get a big raise. The Washington Supreme Court has ruled that the city of SeaTac’s $15 an hour minimum wage applies to airport employees.

Lovincer from Uganda works managing her fresh banana business to support her family.
Facebook Photo/Kiva

Jessica Jackley was a liberal arts major who stumbled her way into the Stanford MBA program.

Philosophy and business came together for her in 2005 when she helped start Kiva, the world’s first person- to-person microlending website. Kiva facilitates lending to poor and underserved entrepreneurs and students in 83 countries.

If you watch the news shows on Sunday mornings, or cable news at night, you've probably seen that ad where parents are dropping off their daughter at college. And then they start to fret about, well, something involving access to investment advice.

The ad ends by urging you to "Tell Congress: Fix this now."

The "steady upward climb" in job creation around the Northwest continues this summer.

Ross Reynolds talks with Kelly McBride, media ethicist at the Poynter Institute, about the backlash from the New York Times' story "Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace." The paper's public editor Margaret Sullivan has weighed in, saying the story was "driven less by irrefutable proof than by generalization and anecdote." Was the story fair? 

Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Former and current employees are getting a letter from Microsoft this week.

It says no more Microsoft stock will be bought for the company’s 401k plan. The question is why.

Why Does Amazon Think It's A Startup?

Aug 18, 2015

Ross Reynolds talks with Chris Devore, managing director of Techstars, about how Amazon can act like a startup even though it's really not one.

Michael McCabe knows what it's like to be surrounded by zombies.

Zombie houses, that is.

McCabe still lives in the neighborhood where he grew up, Woodbury Heights, N.J., a middle-class suburb of Philadelphia. He knows which houses are in foreclosure and which have been abandoned. The latest seems to be right behind his own.

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)

It’s a bruising, even brutal, workplace where an employee caring for a dying parent is seen as “a problem” and people cry at their desks. Or it’s an exhilarating place where even lower-level workers can change the way business gets done in America.

Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop and the Seattle Times’ Jon Talton told KUOW's Ross Reynolds that a New York Times story over the weekend and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ passionate response to it provide an intriguing, complex look inside a company that has remade retail and the city it calls home.

The iconic image of the American farmer is the man or woman who works the land, milks cows and is self-reliant enough to fix the tractor. But like a lot of mechanical items, tractors are increasingly run by computer software. Now, farmers are hitting up against an obscure provision of copyright law that makes it illegal to repair machinery run by software.

Take Dave Alford. He fits that image of the iconic farmer.

Seattle Pot Store Owners Hang On As Weed Prices Fall

Aug 16, 2015
Meghan Walker

It's been a year since the first retail pot shops opened in Washington, and the cost of weed has dropped significantly. But that’s not stopping eager pot entrepreneurs hoping to get in on the budding industry.

Group Challenges Public Employee Unions With Lawsuit

Aug 14, 2015

An Olympia-based libertarian group called the Freedom Foundation is laying down stakes in Oregon by filing a lawsuit against the state’s largest public employee union.

On a recent evening, KUOW reporter Ann Dornfeld froze a tray of wild blackberries. When she pulled out the tray, she saw that tiny worms had crawled out of each berry.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

You know those blackberries you just picked?

There are worms in them.

Tiny white worms, almost transparent, that will ultimately blossom into fruit flies -- unless you eat them first. Scientists know them as Drosophila suzukii.

Curtis Carroll discovered the stock market in prison. Through friends and family on the outside, he invests from San Quentin State Prison in Northern California, and he's also an informal financial adviser to fellow inmates and correctional officers. Everyone in prison calls him Wall Street.

"I couldn't believe that this kind of access to this type of money could be accessible to anybody. Everybody should do it. And it's legal!" he says.

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