business

A summit with leaders of the member states of the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement in 2010.
Wikipedia Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about why she supports the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Then, Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about why he's raising concerns about the TPP.

horse racing
Wikimedia Commons

Marcie Sillman talks with Doug Moore, executive secretary of Washington State's Horse Racing Commission, about trends in the industry and what the future of Emerald Downs could mean for horse racing in Washington.

Courtesy Boeing

There is an old saying in the Pacific Northwest about the state’s largest private employer: “When Boeing sneezes, Seattle catches cold.” 

The Puget Sound region has had its fair share of sniffles over the years, but 14 years ago Boeing made a decision that was one of the most dramatic in the company’s entire history.

Customers line up at Starbucks, all the way outside.
Flickr Photo/oinonio (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks to branding consultant Kevin Paul Scott about the backlash to Starbucks' #RaceTogether initiative, and why it might still be a good idea.

According to the monthly update released Wednesday by Washington's Employment Security Department, the state’s unemployment rate stayed flat in February.

Premera Blue Cross, a health insurer based in Mountlake Terrace, north of Seattle, said Tuesday that it was the victim of a cyberattack that could affect 11 million people.

The company said hackers gained access to its systems on May 5 and that it did not discover the breach until Jan. 29.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

A lawsuit against Seattle’s new $15 an hour minimum wage has failed its first test in court.

Lawyers for the International Franchise Association (IFA) and five local franchisees have sued the city, arguing the law discriminates against franchise businesses.

The region's recent stretch of warm weather means Northwest sweet cherries will likely be going early to market this year.

A cast of characters from Washington’s TV and film industry descended on Olympia Tuesday seeking an expanded tax credit for the film industry.

The Pike Place Market will expand westward, toward the waterfront.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Pike Place Market is going to expand westward.

On Monday, a Seattle City Council committee agreed to pay $34 million from the general fund to build new vendor stalls, senior housing and a public plaza.

The other half of the money comes from tax breaks, grants and philanthropists. The project is part of a larger effort to reconnect the market with the waterfront.

KUOW’s Joshua McNichols has more.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bruce Schneier, author of the new book, "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles To Capture Your Data and Control Your World."

This Week's News Calls For New Leadership

Mar 13, 2015
File Photo: Kathleen O'Toole speaks after being introduced by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray as his nominee to be Seattle's new Chief of Police, May 19, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Is a shakeup of the Seattle Police Department’s top ranks a sign of progress? Should a franchise be considered big business when it comes to Seattle's $15 minimum wage law? And is there hope for Seahawks fans soaked by Super Bowl ticket scammers?

Luke Burbank steps in for KUOW's Bill Radke to make sense of those stories and more of the week's news with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger and Eli Sanders of The Stranger.

Student activists Angela Feng, Sarra Tekola and Alex Lenferna of Divest UW appear before the UW Board of Regents on Thursday to urge the university to get rid of its coal investments..
KUOW photo/John Ryan

Student activists at the University of Washington urged the Board of Regents on Thursday to dump the university's investments in coal.

Why The Nuclear Energy World Is Thinking Small

Mar 13, 2015

In the world of nuclear power, one technology is generating debate: factory-produced reactors that are no bigger than a house.

These "small modular reactors" are designed to produce power on the scale of a single factory or business campus. That’s a big departure from a traditional nuclear plant — the kind that's powerful enough to run an entire metropolis and big enough to be seen from miles away.

Washington state capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to state Rep. Tana Senn, D-Mercer Island, about her bill that passed the state House that would amend the Equal Pay Act, ensuring that employers can't punish employees for talking about their salary.

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