business

Amazon cracks down on fake customer reviews

Jun 7, 2016
Todd Bishop and KUOW's Bill Radke geek out over nausea-free virtual reality in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Geekwire editor Todd Bishop about Amazon suing over fake reviews being posted on the site. The online store is also cracking down on people who pay for fake positive reviews.

A photograph posted to Twitter of the oil train derailment in Mosier, Oregon.
Twitter

A train towing cars full of oil derailed Friday in Oregon's scenic Columbia River Gorge, sparking a fire that sent a plume of black smoke high into the sky.

The accident happened just after noon near the town of Mosier, about 70 miles east of Portland. It involved eight cars filled with oil, and one was burning, said Ken Armstrong, state Forestry Department spokesman.

Bill Radke, second from left, said he was sick of frozen smiles. And Melanie McFarland, next to him, pointed out that crazy bouquet that's been sitting in our green room. Far left, former Mayor Mike McGinn. And far left, Seattle Channel's Joni Balter.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Yeah, those flowers are amazing. But this week!

Seattle city Councilmember Tim Burgess is proposing new regulation on short-term rentals that would affect how people rent on sites like Airbnb and VRBO. He sees it as one the fixes to the affordable housing crisis in the city. Is it fair to fix Seattle’s housing crisis at the expense of short term renters?

Cary Chin works at the front desk of Seattle-based Gravity Payments. CEO Dan Price told his employees that he was cutting his own salary and using company profits so they would each earn a base salary of $70,000.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Kim Malcolm talks with Puget Sound Business Journal editor-in-chief Emily Parkhurst about Dan Price, CEO of Ballard-based Gravity Payments. In 2015, Price announced he would raise the minimum salaries of all of his employees to $70,000. Price is now being sued by his brother Lucas Price, a minority shareholder in the company.

Cascade Locks Leaders Say Nestle Fight Isn't Over

May 26, 2016

City administrator Gordon Zimmerman is quick with the numbers. Sure, Hood River County voters backed Measure 14-55 by a large margin last week.

But as Zimmerman notes, the stats went the other way in Cascade Locks.

Nokia Lumia Windows phone. microsoft
Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bWZ4L4

Kim Malcolm talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about why Microsoft is scaling back its smartphone business and laying off 1,850 employees.

Shareholders of Exxon Mobil and Chevron have voted to reject a series of resolutions aimed at encouraging the companies to take stronger actions to battle climate change.

But Exxon Mobil shareholders voted in favor of a rule that could make it easier for minority shareholders to nominate outsiders to the company's board, a potential victory for environmentalists.

Activist shareholders at both companies had placed an unusual number of resolutions on the ballot related to climate change.

This story is Part 1 of a two-part series. See our second piece about local recovery programs that are struggling to help homeowners here.

On a cold rainy day last fall, dozens of people gathered in a plaza across the street from New Jersey's state Capitol. They held press conferences and slept overnight in lawn chairs.

Flickr Photo/Matthew (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Michael Schutzler, head of the Washington Technology Industry Association,  about his efforts to get tech companies in Seattle more involved in the fight against sex trafficking.  

Many of the department stores that once anchored bustling shopping malls continue to close. Macy's will shutter 36 additional stores this year; 78 Kmart and Sears locations will also close. What to do with that vast, vacant space?

There is no traffic, and no problem finding parking at Owings Mills Mall in Maryland. The 5,000 or so parking spaces are all vacant. A J.C. Penney closed last month and a Macy's closed last year.

When it opened in 1986, it was anchored by a Saks Fifth Avenue and catered to well-to-do Baltimore suburbanites.

Later this week, in hundreds of cities around the globe, from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, to Lancaster, Pa., protesters will "March Against Monsanto." Will they still march if there's no Monsanto?

There's a lot of talk about helping the girls and women of the developing world, but there's not a lot of money to back it up.

According to a 2014 report from the United Nations Population Fund, "less than two cents [of] every international development dollar is spent on an adolescent girl."

We're facing a kind of food revolution, and my generation is driving it.

Not so long ago, when fast-food giants reigned supreme, takeout meant cheap, quick, greasy meals. But a recent Goldman Sachs report found that people under 35 are now demanding food that's fresh and healthful — as well as fast.

More than two-thirds of voters in Oregon's Hood River County passed a local ban on commercial water bottling in Tuesday’s election.

The measure was designed to block Nestle’s plans to build a $50 million water bottling plant in the city of Cascade Locks.

Backers of the measure are calling their victory a landslide, and a triumph of David over Goliath. But so far, Nestle and its supporters say they're ready to accept that narrative.

Should we commercialize our state parks?

May 18, 2016
Lake Sammamish State Park
Flickr Photo/Jeff Sandquist (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5dJnYj

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times reporter Lynn Thompson about the trend of state parks seeking investment and partnerships with private companies. Thompson recently wrote an article about a proposed partnership between Rent-based outdoor retailer REI and Lake Sammamish State Park in Issaquah. 

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