ISIS brings in millions and the US is all but helpless to stop it.

Nov 24, 2015
Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

In the wake of the attacks in Paris, more and more people are saying that when it comes to ISIS, it's time to follow the money.

But where does ISIS — often described as the richest terrorist organization — get their cash from?

According to Cam Simpson, a reporter for Bloomburg Business, the answer to that question is oil.

Parental Leave: Is It Fair To Employees Without Kids?

Nov 23, 2015
Baby kid mom parent
Flickr Photo/DonkerDink (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/

The Seattle City Council on Monday rejected another attempt to increase paid family leave for city workers from four weeks to 12. Estimated cost: $1.5 million a year.

On The Record earlier, Bill Radke heard about the pros and cons of paid parental leave from Kristen Rowe-Finkbeiner, executive director of MomsRising, and Paul Guppy, vice president of research for the Washington Policy Center.

The U.S. drug giant Pfizer and its smaller rival Allergan have agreed to merge, creating the world's biggest pharmaceutical company by sales.

The $160 billion deal is the largest example so far of a corporate inversion, in which a U.S. company merges with a foreign company and shifts its domicile overseas in order to lower its corporate taxes.

If you watch sports on TV, you can't miss the barrage of advertising for fantasy sports websites. Washington and Montana are two of only six states that keep out fantasy sports operators such as FanDuel and DraftKings.

Street sign on Microsoft campus in Redmond, Washington.
Flickr Photo/Todd A Bishop (CC BY 2.0)/

Bill Radke talks with University of Washington history professor Margaret O'Mara about the impact of Microsoft on the economy and culture of the Pacific Northwest.

Flickr Photo/ Thilo M. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/HTTP://BIT.LY/1SBLFKZ

Most cities want to control their own destiny. Shoreline, just north of Seattle, is no exception. But now a deal it hoped would help distinguish it from Seattle has fallen apart.

Food scientists at Washington State University have an unusual new partner to help them evaluate drinks, medicines and sweeteners. It's called the "electronic tongue.”

Strip-mining spoil piles in background in Colstrip, Montana, June 1973.
Flickr Photo/U.S. National Archives (Public Domain)/

David Hyde speaks with Montana Public Radio news director Eric Whitney about how a coal town in Colstrip, Montana could be shuttered by climate change.

Washington is taking legal action against Volkswagen in the wake of a diesel vehicle scandal. Back in September, Volkswagen admitted to installing special software in some of its diesel vehicles, causing them to give false readings during pre-sale air quality tests. Forty-seven states, including Washington and Oregon announced investigations.

Now Washington has given the company formal notice that they violated the state’s Clean Air Act.

Tim Porter and Matt McIlwain of Madrona Venture Group, a heavy funder of Seattle's cloud startups
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle has become the center of a giant, invisible, global business, with Amazon and Microsoft as its core.

That business is the cloud, now estimated to be worth more than $15 billion to those two companies, which have become world leaders.

For small businesses in Washington state, the Export-Import Bank has been crucial when they do business overseas. But the credit agency’s ability to help them is at risk: Its federal charter has expired and renewal legislation has bogged down in Congress.

Caryn Mathes, president and general manager of KUOW Public Radio, spoke to the University of Washington Board of Regents Thursday.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

At KPLU studios in Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood, some employees said they’re disappointed that Pacific Lutheran University would sell the station.

KPLU reporter Gabriel Spitzer said that right up to this announcement he had been making plans for the new local program he hosts, called "Sound Effect." This announcement came as a shock.

A Proposed Seattle NPR Station Sale Would Align Two Overlapping Stations
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Editor's note: The online and on-air versions of this story were edited by the team at Oregon Public Broadcasting.

KUOW, Seattle's NPR member station, announced plans Thursday to purchase and absorb Seattle’s other major NPR station, KPLU, for $8 million. The acquisition would create one large public radio entity in Seattle with KUOW as the central provider of NPR news.

Pacific Lutheran University has announced its intent to sell its public radio license to the University of Washington's KUOW Puget Sound Public Radio.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Pacific Lutheran University on Thursday announced its intent to sell KPLU 88.5 to the University of Washington.

A formal agreement has not yet been finalized.

It is expected that KUOW will manage 88.5 FM, which currently is operated by KPLU.

Bellingham, Washington-based Haggen mushroomed in size at the beginning of 2015 by acquiring 146 grocery stores across the West from Boise-based Albertsons and Safeway. Those two chains had to unload stores to gain federal approval to merge.