business | KUOW News and Information

business

This is the final part in a series on the future of fish farming in the Pacific Northwest. Read part 1 here.

Inside a chilly warehouse on the north end of Vancouver Island, eight giant tanks are lit with swimming pool lights. These are fish tanks — some of the biggest fish tanks around. Every so often the glistening back of a fish surfaces.

This is the first part in a series on the future of fish farming in the Pacific Northwest. Read the second part here.

The Hope Island Fish Farm floats in the middle of Puget Sound, about a 15-minute boat ride from Whidbey Island’s Deception Pass. Narrow metal walkways surround giant nets anchored to the bottom of the sound. Those nets hold thousands of Atlantic salmon--though it’s difficult to see them till they jump.

Boxed items are shown on conveyer belts leading to docks where they will be loaded onto trucks at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

We're a conflicted bunch.

On one hand, we love to hate Amazon in Seattle because the city grew too fast and it's made problems for a lot of people. But a lot of us are also huge Amazon shoppers. 

Think about that: Amazon is so good at what it does that even people who say they shouldn't, use it.


Tents are shown as people gathered to protest the sweeps of homeless camps in November, 2017, at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle's City Council wants to bring back its "head tax" proposal — and soon. The idea is to tax the city's largest businesses based on their number of employees.

M
Vincent Kessler/Reuters

In the US, and throughout the globe for that matter, the private sector is increasingly being looked to as a source of leadership for combating climate change. And many companies are stepping up, especially with the lack of leadership coming from Washington.

Consider the family-owned company Mars, the world’s largest candy maker — it produces iconic brands like Snickers, Skittles and M&M’s.

The Spokane City Council will consider an ordinance Monday, that would make it easier for anyone with a criminal record to be hired.

Documentary filmmaker Christopher Rufo doesn't make enough money to have to pay Seattle's new high-earners tax, but he still wants to keep Seattle income-tax-free. So much so, he joined around 30 plaintiffs suing the city.

Traffic is seen on I-5 from 45th St., on Friday, October 27, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

A couple of years ago, a semitruck carrying a load of fish overturned on the Alaskan Way Viaduct during rush hour on a Tuesday.

We get it: This is possibly the most stereotypical Seattle problem ever.


Alaska Airlines is saying "Adios" to Cuba. The Seattle-based airline Tuesday announced it will discontinue flights to Havana after the holidays. Alaska joins a parade of other U.S. carriers who are trimming back flights to Cuba or dropping service entirely.

Gov. Jay Inslee leads a study mission to Switzerland to learn more about the country's apprenticeship system November 10, 2017.
Flickr Photo/Jay Inslee (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/21uMMxx

Washington Governor Jay Inslee wants to develop a new normal for high school students: joining apprenticeship programs.

Nike has entered into a new contract with the University of Washington that includes changes to its overseas factory inspections.
Flickr Photo/Open Grid Scheduler (CC0 1.0) https://flic.kr/p/wCUd4F

The University of Washington has agreed to a contract with Nike that's expected to set a new industry standard. The contract allows a watchdog group, Worker Rights Consortium, to investigate problem factories.


Washington state is proposing changes to how winery wastewater is handled. And that could mean consumers are in for some “bottle shock” when their favorite Washington wine gets more expensive.

A saga involving a Pacific Northwest hemp fashion company in search of a bank has been resolved, but points to the murky legal landscape facing some cannabis-related businesses.

After two rescinded business accounts and a bank's change of heart, hemp clothing and accessories retailer Rawganique is back where it started.

Amazon employees walk in front of a map highlighting 238 cities that submitted bids for Amazon's second headquarters in the lobby of the Day 1 building on Tuesday, October 24, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

So.

It’s been a little tense in Seattle since Amazon started shopping around for a new city to love.


Hillsboro, Oregon – At the SolarWorld Americas plant outside Portland, John Clason loads a stack of solar cells into a machine that builds them into panels.

He used to be a cabinet maker, but he switched industries after the 2008 recession.

"The job I had dried up," he said. "So, I looked around and I thought solar panels would be great – the wave of the future, you know?"

What happens when you're faced with a workforce that seems unwelcoming or even hostile? For people like Dennis Jackson, often the answer is to become your own boss.

In Los Angeles, he is making the best of an October heat wave by selling solar panels. Jackson says he has essentially always been an entrepreneur. He started in landscaping and moved toward solar panel installation.

This story has been updated.

Since recreational marijuana became legal in Washington state and Oregon, the booming industry has been having having trouble accessing the banking system. And now a hemp fashion retailer in Blaine, Washington, is having the same problem.

Lines of code
Flickr Photo/markus spiske (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/XLGzE5


Thinking of making a career switch? Maybe you should consider coding.

No, really — it’s not as hard as you probably think. That’s according to Cheri Allen, a software engineer and educator at the University of Washington and Unloop.

A box containing an order from Amazon.com is shown after it was delivered to a house in Etters, Pa, Wednesday, Sept 16, 2005.
AP Photo/John Zeedick

Bill Radke talks with Washington Post opinion columnist Christine Emba about Amazon Key, a new delivery service from Amazon that drops off packages inside customer's homes.

Emba's latest column in titled "Amazon Key is Silicon Valley at its most out of touch."

File photo of homeless ecampment under bridge.
KUOW Photo

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about a proposed head tax that would require high earning businesses in Seattle to pay $100 per employee. The funds raised would go towards programs that help people experiencing homelessness.  

Tesla has used its solar panels and batteries to restore reliable electricity at San Juan's Hospital del Niño (Children's Hospital), in what company founder Elon Musk calls "the first of many solar+battery Tesla projects going live in Puerto Rico."

The project came about after Puerto Rico was hit by two devastating and powerful hurricanes in September, and Musk reached out about Tesla helping.

For years, Amazon has been testing the limits of online deliveries — expanding the number of things you can order at the click of a button (sometimes literally), pushing shipments to arrive faster, toying with delivery by drones.

Model airplanes are stored at the Boeing Historical Archives on Friday, September 15, 2017, in Bellevue.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Jeannie Yandel talks with Marcie Sillman about Bill Boeing, Nellie Cornish and other innovators who had a lasting impact on Seattle. 

KUOW's new project City of Dreams explores the key figures who shaped the Puget Sound region and highlights the work of today's innovators who are shaping the future.

While you're focused on getting that last-minute costume and candy ready, Northwest tree farmers are sharpening their blades to cut and bale your Christmas tree.

But be warned: you might not get that noble fir of your dreams this year due to a Christmas tree crunch in the Northwest.

The first Boeing airplane, the Bluebill, B&W Model 1, assembled and launched from Seattle's Lake Union
photo courtesy Boeing Historical Archives

On any given weekday morning, thousands of young professionals flood the streets in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood. Their identical black backpacks and swinging lanyards mark them as employees of the global retail behemoth Amazon.

Amazon confirmed a second and 'full equal' headquarters somewhere other than in the Puget Sound region.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with KUOW reporters Joshua McNichols and Carolyn Adolph about the implications for cities hoping to land Amazon's second headquarters. McNichols and Adolph are co-hosts of KUOW's new podcast Prime(d).

Radke also talks with listeners about their advice to other cities hoping to reel in Amazon.

A group of people jog across Lenora Street, on Thursday, October 5, 2017, in front of Amazon's biodomes, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Do us a favor. Look up relentless.com. 

No really — try it.

We’ll wait.


Employment numbers are out for both Washington and Oregon. Since last September, Washington has gained more than 91,000 jobs and Oregon has gained more than 37,000 jobs. 



The largest growth in both states has taken place in the government sector.

If you've ever put in eyedrops, some of them have almost certainly spilled onto your eyelid or cheek.

The good news is the mess doesn't necessarily mean you missed. The bad news is that medicine you wiped off your face is wasted by design — and it's well-known to the drug companies that make the drops.

On Saturday, March 19 light rail stations opened serving Capitol Hill and the University of Washington (pictured).
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle suddenly seems like a very small town —  at least when you look at the mayoral candidates and their family ties.


Pages