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budget

Flickr Photo/Noelle Noble

Budget Deal In Olympia
Everett Herald columnist and Weekday’s regular Olympia guru Jerry Cornfield brings us analysis of the tentative budget deal reached by state lawmakers.
 
Immigration Deal In DC
Yesterday's immigration reform vote is being hailed as a rare example of bipartisanship. The Senate voted 68 to 32 yesterday to overhaul the nation’s immigration system. It now heads to the House. We talk with Jill Jackson of CBS News from Washington, DC.

Rethinking How We Study Cancer
A scientist at Johns Hopkins University developed a mathematical model to better understand why some cancer tumors are resistant to cancer fighting drugs. Science reporter Carl Zimmer explains the study and how scientists are changing the way they think about cancer.

Pet Questions Answered
Got a difficult dog or cat? Pet trainer, Steve Duno, tackles your questions at 206.543.5869 (KUOW).  Also, is neutering dogs always a good idea?  

There’s suddenly a flurry of talk in Olympia about a quick resolution to the weeks-long budget stalemate. The change in rhetoric follows Tuesday’s positive revenue and caseload forecasts.

Budget writers will now have an additional $300 million-plus to help bridge their differences. They can thank a recovering housing market and improved consumer confidence.

The House and Senate have been locked in a partisan fight over whether to raise additional revenues by closing some tax exemptions. This new money could now fill that gap.

Flickr Photo/bryce_edwards

Budget officials in the city of Seattle delivered some good news yesterday. For the first time since the financial crisis, the city is forecasting a budget surplus.

KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

If you’ve never been to the Lynnwood Municipal Golf Course before, it’s kind of tough to find. The course itself is way at the back of the parking lot of Edmonds Community College. The only clues you’re in the right place are the high ball nets surrounding the course. And, of course, golfers like Espie Grundy and Jackie Garmeyer, who are wheeling their clubs towards the green for their weekly tee time. “We try to play even if it’s raining,” Espie says.

Would A Budget By Any Other Name Not Smell As Sweet?

Apr 11, 2013
Flickr Photo/401(K) 2013

Governor Inslee released his budget proposal a couple weeks ago, and then came the Washington Senate budget. Yesterday the House released their budget and today Ross Reynolds talks with Representative Ross Hunter about how the House budget differs from the Senate and gubernatorial budget plans. 

Favorite Interviews: Comedian David Alan Grier And Chef Eddie Huang

Apr 4, 2013
Fresh Off The Boat
Courtesy/Spiegel & Grau

Our spring membership drive continues with two of our favorite recent interviews. First, we listen back to our conversation with actor and comedian David Alan Grier. He joined us in the studio to talk about his 30-year career in entertainment, from the theater to television's "In Living Color" to Broadway. Then, we revisit our talk with restaurateur Eddie Huang about food, hip-hop and the experience of growing up a first-generation immigrant in the US.

Washington State House Democrats Photo

  Leaders of some cities in Washington state say public-records requests take a big bite out of their already strained budgets. A new bill in Olympia aims to fix that. It would limit the amount of time and money cities in Washington would have to spend on public-records requests. Ross Reynolds talks with the bill's prime sponsor, Representative Dean Takko. 

Unless lawmakers in the other Washington can come to an agreement, the US is facing $85 billion of automatic spending cuts. How will sequestration hit us here in the Evergreen state?

Ross Reynolds talks with Governor Jay Inslee's budget director, David Schumacher, about how the looming federal budget cuts will impact Washington state.

Douglas Foster On South Africa After Mandela

Jan 28, 2013
After Mandela
Courtesy/Liveright

Capitalism, democracy and HIV all arrived at about the same time in South Africa, where the promise of the Mandela era has still not been met. The nation struggles with an epidemic of poverty, illness and violence. Can the next generation of leaders reshape its cultural and political realities? Douglas Foster, author of "After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa," joins us.

School buses parked in a parking lot.
Flickr / tncountryfan

Washington Governor Chris Gregoire proposed a new wholesale vehicle fuel tax Tuesday that you might notice at the gas pump. The governor said the move will help the state support education by helping cover the costs of getting kids to school.

Currently, school districts help pay for students' transportation needs, but a recent court ruling says state government is not doing enough to support education. That includes education-related transportation.

"We're building a budget assuming everybody works their problems out in the best interest of the nation." That's how Stan Marshburn, outgoing director of Washington State's Office of Financial Management is planning for the fiscal cliff.

He says we're likely to suffer either way. If we go over the cliff, we can expect 50 percent cut to state military spending. To avoid the cliff, federal lawmakers might agree to reduce Medicaid spending -- another precious source of federal money.

Marshburn tells Ross his biggest concern is consumer confidence, since Washington gets so much of its money from sales tax.  He says reduced consumer spending could impact Washington's economy 10 times more than the actual fiscal cliff itself.

Ed Murray
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

State Senator Ed Murray is the new majority leader of the Washington state senate.  But he faces some tough challenges, including a $900 million budget hole, a Supreme Court ruling that requires full funding for basic K-12 education and a possible rebellion by conservative Democrats.  David Hyde sits down with State Senator Ed Murray and asks, What's next? 

The Seattle City Council is voting on the city budget next Monday. They’ve made some changes in  Mayor McGinn’s original proposal.  Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn about the upcoming budget vote.

(Photo/City of Kent)

The Mayor of Kent, Washington is proposing another round of layoffs and new taxes to bridge a $2 million budget shortfall. Mayor Suzette Cooke presented her 2013-2014 budget to the City Council Tuesday. In her opening speech, Mayor Cooke called her budget “as ugly as the economic times we face.”

Randy Dorn
(AP Photo/John Froschauer, File)

Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn has asked for an additional $4.1 billion for basic education in his biennial budget proposal, a 39 percent increase compared to the current budget. Dorn says that’s what it’ll take for the state Legislature to fulfill its constitutional duty to fully fund K-12 education.

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