Bowe Bergdahl | KUOW News and Information

Bowe Bergdahl

A Navy SEAL testified Wednesday in Fort Bragg, N.C., that he was shot and badly injured during a heavy firefight while searching for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl after Bergdahl walked off his combat outpost in Afghanistan.

The military judge, Army Col. Jeffery Nance, is allowing the testimony of three service members whose injuries are considered a direct result of the searches for Bergdahl, who was captured by the Taliban and held for five years. He has pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl made his first appearance before a military judge today. Bergdahl walked away from his post in Afghanistan in 2009 and was held captive by the Taliban for five years. He faces charges of desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.

During the arraignment at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, Bergdahl deferred entering a plea. He also did not indicate whether he wants to face a court-martial with a jury or one with just a judge, The Associated Press reports. If found guilty of the charges, Bergdahl could face life in prison.

File photo of Bowe Bergdahl at his graduation from basic training with the Army.
Bergdahl family

The desertion case against Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will go to a full court-martial, his attorney said Monday.

Bergdahl walked away from his remote outpost in Afghanistan in 2009 and was captured by the Taliban.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl described how he became imprisoned by the Taliban in his first publicly released interview Thursday. The soldier from Idaho is the subject of a new season of the public radio podcast “Serial.”

The second season of Serial, a podcast produced by This American Life and WBEZ in Chicago, is here.

This season focuses on the controversial story of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. We've covered that case quite a bit on this blog, but Serial is giving it the long-form investigative treatment and also has obtained 25 hours of recorded conversations between Bergdahl and Hollywood screenwriter Mark Boal.

File photo of Bowe Bergdahl at his graduation from basic training with the Army.
Bergdahl family

There’s a recommendation on whether Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will face a court martial, but it’s not being released to the public yet.

Bergdahl’s attorney says the hearing officer overseeing the Army’s case sent his recommendations Monday to the U.S. Army Forces Command at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

File photo of Bowe Bergdahl at his graduation from basic training with the Army.
Bergdahl family

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl faces a hearing Thursday to determine whether he’ll be court-martialed on a desertion charge.

Dehydrated alcohol is a subject of debate in Washington. Joni Balter says that it could become an "REI thing" for hikers who don't want to have to haul a beer in their pack.
Flickr Photo/Allagash Brewing (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Should Washington state ban powdered alcohol? Should Army soldier Bowe Bergdahl go from hero to pariah? Is it time to leave Amanda Knox alone? And does your state auditor owe it to you to be more squeaky clean than any other official?

KUOW’s Bill Radke discusses the week’s news with former Republican state Sen. Bill Finkbeiner, Crosscut’s Knute Berger and Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's attorney released details of his captivity in Afghanistan after the Army charged him Wednesday with desertion.

The home town of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is quiet Wednesday now that the former P.O.W. is charged with desertion.

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has been charged with desertion and misbehavior before the enemy.

Bergdahl was captured by the Taliban in 2009, after he walked off his military outpost in southeastern Afghanistan. In a controversial move and five years after his capture, the Obama administration cut a deal with the Taliban, securing Bergdahl's release in exchange for the release of five Taliban detainees who were being held at the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba.

The Pentagon has forwarded its investigation into Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's disappearance from an Afghan outpost to a general courts-martial convening authority, a Pentagon spokesman said today.

Bergdahl is the U.S. soldier who was held for five years by the Taliban in Afghanistan. The U.S. gained his freedom in May by trading him for five jailed Taliban.

The Pentagon spokesman said today that action against Bergdahl could range from no further action to convening a court martial.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is due to be briefed on a report detailing the disappearance of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

An independent government investigation out Thursday finds the Pentagon broke the law when it swapped five members of the Taliban for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl of Idaho.

The attorney for rescued POW Bowe Bergdahl expects the Army sergeant to be interviewed by military investigators within the coming weeks.

The investigation into Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s capture is ongoing. Bergdahl has retained a lawyer who will be with him during questioning by U.S. Army investigators. In the meantime, the former POW will return to regular duty at an Army base in Texas.

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl arrived at a military hospital in Texas Friday to continue his recovery process. There has been no shortage of strong opinions about the release of the former POW - except, that is, among Idaho's congressional delegation.

This post was updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in the U.S.

As we told you early this morning, Bergdahl, who was freed May 31 by his Taliban captors in exchange for five of the group's members in Guantanamo Bay, arrived at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio after a flight from Ramstein Air Base in Germany. He will continue his treatment at the center.

This post was updated at 4:15 a.m. ET Friday:

U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl has arrived at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio after a flight from Ramstein Air Base in Germany, according to a Pentagon spokesman. He will receive medical treatment and will be reunited with his family.

This post was updated at 5:30 p.m. ET

The parents of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl issued a statement through social media Monday. Bob and Jani Bergdahl thanked the people who have supported them for nearly five years as they waited for their son to be freed from Taliban captivity.

The news of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's release from five years of captivity had been welcomed as a reason to celebrate in Hailey, Idaho. But organizers of a rally held in Bergdahl's honor while he was a prisoner say they're canceling this year's event, citing backlash over the U.S. deal with the Taliban that freed him.

In recent years, the Bring Back Bowe Rally has been an annual June event in the small town of Hailey, where bikers and POW-MIA support groups gathered to call for his return. Last year's event reportedly drew a crowd of more than 3,000.

People in Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's hometown of Hailey, Idaho, say they're “shocked” by how quickly the captive soldier's homecoming has turned into a national controversy.

A Black Hawk helicopter swoops in to pick up Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in a valley in Afghanistan, in a video of the handover of the American prisoner of war that was posted online early Wednesday. The Pentagon says it's reviewing the video; a spokesman says there's no reason to question its authenticity.

President Obama today [Tuesday] defended the deal under which Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was freed in exchange for high-level Taliban prisoners, saying his administration had consulted with Congress over a possible trade. And, he dismissed questions about how Bergdahl was captured by Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan in June 2009.

David Rohde is a former New York Times journalist who was held captive by the Taliban for seven months.

He says Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, who was just released after being held for five years by the Taliban, faces a long road ahead, that begins with debriefing by the U.S. military who want to know more about the Taliban.

Rohde speaks to Here & Now’s Robin Young.

Along with celebrations over the release of U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, there are growing questions. House Intelligence Committee Chair Mike Rogers of Michigan is asking whether the Obama administration broke the law in not consulting Congress over the negotiations and says this is a “dangerous” precedent: “If you negotiate here, you’ve sent a message to every Al Qaeda group in the world — by the way, some who are holding U.S. hostages today — that there is some value now in that hostage in a way that they didn’t have before.”

After five years in captivity, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is finally free. The American POW is now receiving medical aid at a U.S. military hospital in Germany.

A U.S. soldier held nearly five years in captivity by the Taliban is returning home. This morning, President Obama announced the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl of Hailey, Idaho.

(This post was last updated Sunday at 5:50 a.m. ET. on Sunday)

Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the final remaining captured American soldier from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, has been released by the Afghan Taliban after almost five years of being held captive, the White House said on Saturday.

In exchange for Bergdahl's release, the U.S. will transfer five detainees at the Guantánamo Bay prison to Qatar.

The Idaho family of captured U.S. soldier Bowe Bergdahl is welcoming an effort to get their son home through a prisoner swap.