Boston Marathon

In the men's field of the 118th Boston Marathon, American Meb Keflezighi ended a 31-year drought for U.S. runners, after holding off Wilson Chebet of Kenya in a race that came down to the final mile.

According to race officials, Keflezighi, 38, ran a 4:56 split at mile 23, when he built a 20-second lead. That lead dwindled as the runners neared the finish line, but Keflezighi held off all challengers to win the race with an unofficial finishing time of 2:08:37.

We don't need to go on at length about why today's running of the Boston Marathon is important.

At Monday's Boston Marathon, many runners will be on the course to honor the 16 people who lost limbs in last year's bombing. One married couple was among them: Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes.

Among many dark stories of that day, theirs is among the darkest. They were newlyweds of just seven months when each had their left leg blown off. Their injuries were so severe that they were some of the last victims to leave the hospital.

Twitter Image/Boston Police Department

When the deadly Boston Marathon bombings happened a year ago, people flocked to social media sites like Twitter for information. But that led to some problems, including the misidentification of one of the suspected bombers and other reports that turned out to be false.

Eight runners entered in the 2014 Boston Marathon are documenting their race preparations for NPR in a Tumblr blog. Demi Clark is one of the eight, and this is her story.

The phrase Boston Strong emerged almost immediately after last year's marathon bombings as an unofficial motto of a city responding to tragedy. But now some are wondering whether the slogan is being overused.

The words are everywhere: Boston Strong is plastered on cars, cut into the grass at Fenway, tattooed on arms, bedazzled on sweatshirts and printed on T-shirts (and everything else).

Vimeo/Courtesy William Anthony Photography/wmanthony.com

Bill Iffrig was 15 feet from finishing the Boston Marathon in April when the first bomb went off.

AP Photo/Ilkham Katsuyev

On July 10, Dzhokar Tsarnaev, one of the suspects in the Boston marathon bombing, will have his first court appearance on charges of using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction, a count that carries a possible death penalty.

He and his older brother Tamerlan emigrated as children to the US from the Russian republic of Dagestan, now the scene of an Islamist insurgency. In a rare interview for the World Service program Newshour, the brothers' mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, talked to Tim Franks in Dagestan.

Boston Marathon Bombings: The Social Media Manhunt

Apr 22, 2013
Twitter Image/Boston Police Department

Professional and citizen journalists turned to social media last week to report and gather information on the bombings in Boston. But in the rush to get the latest news out, rumors and misinformation ran rampant. KUOW’s Ross Reynolds spoke with Seattle Times technology columnist Mónica Guzmán about how to avoid making social media mistakes when breaking news happens.

Behind The Scenes With SPD's Bomb Unit

Apr 18, 2013
Bomb Squad
Flickr Photo/Settsu

Investigators are trying to piece together this week's bombings at the Boston Marathon. What clues are they looking for? How are bombs detected and disarmed? Seattle Police Department explosives experts Randy Curtis and Craig Williamson join us with an inside look. Call with your questions to 206.543.5869.


VIDEO: Watch Dennis the SPD Bomb Dog In Action

Stories From The Boston Marathon Finish Line

Apr 16, 2013
62-year-old Jeff Poppe (in red) at the 26-mile mark.
Photos courtesy Jeff and Anita Poppe

The force of the first blast at the Boston Marathon threw runner Bill Iffrig of Lake Stevens, Wash. to the ground. The photograph of Iffrig has become an iconic image of Monday’s tragedy.

The force of the first blast at the Boston Marathon threw runner Bill Iffrig of Lake Stevens, Wash. to the ground. The photograph of Iffrig has become an iconic image of Monday’s tragedy.

Two explosions rocked the finish line of the Boston Marathon this afternoon, leaving at least three dead and dozens injured, the Boston Police Department reports.

The explosions happened in quick succession four hours after the beginning of the race, the world's oldest and one of the most prestigious road races in the world. At that point, the majority of 27,000 runners had crossed the finish line. Thousands, however, were still out on the course.