books

Tibetan School For The Blind
9:35 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Lessons On Blindness, 'For The Benefit Of Those Who See'

A blind child studies at the Braille Without Borders school in Lhasa, Tibet, in 2005. The program was the first of its kind in the country.
China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 3:50 pm

In 2005, Rosemary Mahoney was assigned to write a magazine profile of the woman who started Tibet's first school for the blind, Braille Without Borders.

Sabriya Tenberken, who is blind herself, traveled to Tibet as a young woman and found that blind children there had no access to education, which motivated her to set up a program. During college in Germany, where she grew up, Tenberken also developed the first Braille script for the Tibetan language.

Read more
Good Reads
7:00 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Nancy Pearl Can’t Wait For These Women Writers’ Books

Public radio librarian Nancy Pearl.
KUOW Photo

Nancy Pearl is looking forward to reading at least three books coming out in 2014. Of course, this is only the start of her 2014 reading list. 

In fiction, the popular Jo Walton has another science fiction novel, “My Real Children.” In non-fiction, “Hotel Florida: Truth, Love, and Death in the Spanish Civil War,” by Amanda Vaill and “Flappers: Six Women Of A Dangerous Generation,” by Judith Mackrell. 

Literary Controversy
3:30 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Fifty Years After ‘Eichmann In Jerusalem’ With Seyla Benhabib

Hannah Arendt's book "Eichmann in Jerusalem," which was one of the most controversial books of the last century.

In 1963, one of the most controversial books of the twentieth century was published. “Eichmann in Jerusalem” presented Adolf Eichmann not as a sociopath — but as an ordinary person who simply believed his actions were normal. The author of this book, political theorist Hannah Arendt, refers to this theory as the “banality of evil.” Arendt was a Jew who fled Germany in the early 1930s. 

Yale professor Seyla Benhabib offers an overview of the controversy surrounding Arendt’s book, and what lessons it can teach us about humanity. Benhabib spoke at the University of Washington’s Kane Hall on October 24, 2013 as part of the Graduate School lecture series.

Books And Guns
10:02 am
Tue January 7, 2014

Why Seattle Public Library Surrendered Its Gun Ban

Seattle Public Library lifted its gun ban in November after a patron complained that the library rule was breaking the law.
Credit Flickr Photo/Frank Fujimoto

When Seattle Public Library lifted its ban on guns in early November, officials there said they had done so because patrons had complained.  

Internal library emails reveal that there was just one patron complaint in several years – a man with a Yahoo email account who didn’t identify himself as either a patron or Seattle resident.

Read more
Secrets And Lies
11:57 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

The Secret Burglary That Exposed J. Edgar Hoover's FBI

FBI director J. Edgar Hoover is seen in his Washington office, May 20, 1963. The 1971 burglary of one of the bureau's offices revealed the agency's domestic surveillance program.
William J. Smith AP

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 11:23 am

More than 40 years ago, on the evening of March 8, 1971, a group of burglars carried out an audacious plan. They pried open the door of an FBI office in Pennsylvania and stole files about the bureau's surveillance of anti-war groups and civil rights organizations.

Hundreds of agents tried to identify the culprits, but the crime went unsolved. Until now.

Read more
Good Reads
3:59 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

Nancy Pearl's Recommendations: Allegory And Mystery

Flickr Photo/German Poo-Caamano (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher sits down once again with Nancy Pearl to discuss three books from 2013 that she recommends before they get lost amidst the new books of the new year; including a modern allegory “The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War”  by Stephen Kinzer, and Laurie R. King’s mysteries “A Grave Talent” and “To Play The Fool."

Sexism
1:33 pm
Fri January 3, 2014

‘Making Feminist And Queer Movements More Inclusive’ With Julia Serano

Julia Serano's book "Excluded."

Julia Serano has challenged exclusion in the feminist and queer movements for years. As an activist and trans woman, Serano was shocked to see some people challenge one type of sexism while ignoring — and sometimes furthering — others.

In her new book, "Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive," Serano calls for a new, inclusive approach to battling sexism. She spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on December 4.

History
3:59 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

The Long Road Back: Polish-Jewish Relations Today

Louise Steinman's book "The Crooked Mirror."

"Do they miss us?”

That was the question on Louise Steinman’s mind  when she decided to travel to Poland and explore the country’s efforts at reconciliation with their traumatic past of dual occupations of the Nazis and Soviets.

Read more
Good Reads
2:47 pm
Fri December 27, 2013

Nancy Pearl’s Six Great Books Of 2013

Nancy Pearl checks out KUOW's free bookshelf.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Steve Scher gets Nancy Pearl's top picks of the year including “Americanah” and “The Woman Who Lost Her Soul” for fiction; “Five Days At Memorial” and “Lawrence in Arabia” for nonfiction; and “The Reader’s Book of Days” and “Constellation of Genius: 1922 Modernism Year One" for titles that you may have overlooked.

Author Interview
3:20 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

The Writing Life, One Day At A Time

Tom Nissley's "A Reader's Book of Days."

Steve Scher talks with writer Tom Nissley about his book, "A Reader's Book of Days," and the lessons learned from his eight wins on Jeopardy!.

Author Interview
2:45 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

An American Family In Iran

Hooman Majd's book "The Ministry of Guidance Invites You To Not Stay."

Steve Scher talks with journalist Hooman Majd about his book, “The Ministry of Guidance Invites You To Not Stay," which chronicles moving to Iran with his wife and child in 2011 to live in the country he was born in, but had never really lived in.

Good Reads
3:17 pm
Fri December 20, 2013

Nancy Pearl’s Suggestions For Literary Gifts

KUOW Photo

Steve Scher talks to Nancy Pearl about tricks in picking out a book as a gift for a loved one. Her first suggestion — imagine the person reading the book.

You can also hear a special hour-long listener call-in and see a full list of Pearl's and listeners' reading suggestions from Monday.

Read more
Tribal Instincts
11:37 am
Fri December 20, 2013

Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?

Joshua Greene's book "Moral Tribes."

As humans, we’re designed to work together with certain groups of people while fighting off others. In modern times though, our tribes have been forced closer to others, sparking clashes. What is a practical way to solve these problems? And how can different tribes move forward together?

Psychologist Joshua Greene traces the roots of morality and conflict in his new book, “Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them.” He spoke at Town Hall on November 15.

Author Interview
3:35 pm
Tue December 17, 2013

Ben Fong-Torres Tells The Story Of Little Feat

Ben Fong-Torres' book "Willin'"

Ross Reynolds talks with author Ben Fong-Torres about his new band biography, "Willin': The Story of Little Feat."

Author Interview
3:11 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

Israeli Journalist Ari Shavit Looks At The Roots Of The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Ari Shavit's book "My Promised Land."

Marcie Sillman talks with Israeli journalist and author Ari Shavit about his new book, "My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel".

Pages