books

Matthew Thomas' book "We Are Not Ourselves."

Marcie Sillman talks to author Matthew Thomas about his first novel "We Are Not Ourselves."

David Hyde talks to author Rick Perlstein about his new book, "The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan."

Dana Goldstein's book "The Teacher Wars"

Marcie Sillman talks to journalist Dana Goldstein about her new book, "The Teacher Wars: A History of America's Most Embattled Profession," which delves into how standardized testing has changed the classroom and the future of education in the United States.

KUOW Photo/Arwen Nicks

Ross Reynolds speaks with John Dean, who was President Richard Nixon's one-time legal counsel and was a pivotal figure in the Watergate scandal that led to Nixon's resignation in 1974.  

Susan Rich
Kelli Russell Agodon

Seattle-based poet and human rights activist Susan Rich reads two poems concerning the ongoing conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.

The first is "The Wall" from her 2000 collection "The Cartographer's Tongue," winner of the PEN USA Award for Poetry. 

The second is "What We Were Taught / What We Have Lost," written in response to the most recent violence.

Siri Hustvedt's novel "The Blazing World."

Marcie Sillman sits down with book luster Nancy Pearl and learns about the latest novel from author Siri Hustvedt, "The Blazing World, " about one woman's efforts to make it in the art world by using male pseudonyms. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle chef and restaurateur Renee Erickson about her first cookbook, "A Boat, a Whale, & a Walrus: Menus and Stories,” written with Jess Thomson. Erickson talks about going from an art major at the University of Washington to running four restaurants, The Whale Wins, the Boat Street Café, Barnacle, and the Walrus and the Carpenter, an acclaimed oyster bar.

Flickr Photo/Debbie R

American as apple pie, the expression goes.

Except that the only apple native to North America is the crab apple, said Rowan Jacobsen, author of “Apples of Uncommon Character.” He spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman about apple history – and where you can find the most delicious varieties.

Kristin Ohlson's book "The Soil Will Save Us."

This week on Speakers Forum we’ll hear from author Kristin Ohlson. Her new book is "The Soil Will Save Us: How Scientists, Farmers, and Foodies Are Healing the Soil to Save the Planet."

In it she sheds light on our understanding of soil and its crucial role in capturing and storing carbon emissions. Ohlson details how changes in how we farm may hold the key to countering global warming.

Ohlson is a freelance journalist and author based in Portland, Ore. She’s written for the New York Times, the Christian Science Monitor, Utne and Salon. Her books include "Stalking the Divine" and "Kabul Beauty School."

Ohlson spoke at The Elliott Bay Book Company on July 28. Thanks to Anna Tatistcheff for this recording. 

Paul Robert's book "The Impuse Society"

Ross Reynolds talks with author Paul Roberts about his book, "The Impulse Society." In it, Roberts argues that the pursuit of short-term self-gratification has serious consequences for today's culture and economic systems.

Ben Macintyre's book "A Spy Among Friends."

Marcie Sillman gets this week's book recommendation from literary maven Nancy Pearl, who suggests picking up non-fiction spy thriller, "A Spy Among Friends," by Ben Macintyre. It's the account of Kim Philby, who double-crossed British intelligence for the Soviet Union in the height of the Cold War.

Tom Robbins' book "Tibetan Peach Pie"

Today on Speakers Forum best-selling author Tom Robbins returns home to tell some mostly true stories from his new memoir, "Tibetan Peach Pie: A True Account of an Imaginative Life."

It starts with 5-year-old “Tommy Rotten” forcing his mother to take dictation, and leads to a very good Tom Clancy impersonation.

Flickr Photo/Lockhaven (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with journalist and writer Charles Mudede about his suggestions for books to read before the summer ends: "The Ameoba in the Room," by Nicholas Money; "Willing Slaves of Capital," by Frederic Lordon; and the short stories of G.K. Chesterton.

Before Coe Booth was a writer, she was a caseworker with child protective services in New York City, where she worked with teenagers and families in crisis. She was, at times, responsible for removing children from their homes and placing them with foster families. The foster parents would often have children of their own.

"I was always wondering: What would it be like for those kids to have these new kids come and leave and come and leave and not want to attach to them?" she tells Tess Vigeland, guest host of NPR's weekends on All Things Considered.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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